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Full text of "Bay region business"

CALIFORNIANA 
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B 3 k 1 



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SAN FRANCISCO 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 1223 04552 0591 



REFERENCE BOOK 

Not to be taken from the Library 



INDEX 

BaY region business 

1944 



AGRICULTURE 

New Produce Market Studies Made by Enlarged Committee Vol.1 No. 2- 4-13-44 

Farmer's Free Mar/.et Backed by Chamber as 

War Measure Vol.1 No. 8- 5-25-44 

1944 State Almond Crop Vol.1 No. 3 5-11- 30-44 

Farm Representatives in Nation's Capital on 

Labor Procurement Vol.1 No. 37-12-14-44 

AGRICULTURAL DEPARTMENT OF S.F. C. OF C. 



Charles Gibbs Aopointed C. of C. Agricultural 

Activities uianager Vol.1 No. 37-12-14-44 

AIR CARGO. INC. 

Mr Cargo Survey Starts Here Vol.1 No. 6- 5-11-44 

Salinas Perishables Flown to New York .Vol.1 No. 35-11-30-44 

AIR GLOBE 

American Airlines Presents "Air Globe" to 

S.F. Chamber Vol.1 Mo. 10- 6- 8-44 

AIR TRANSPORTATION 

Western Airlines Institutes New Non-stoo 

Service From S.F. to L.A Vol.1 No. 4- 4-27-44 

San Francirco To Be Surveyed for Type? Air 

Transport Needs Vol.1 No. 5- 5-25-44 

S. F. Airport Expands Vol.1 No. 8- 5-25-44 

United Airlines Applies for More Direct Service 

From Here Vol.1 No. 8- 5-25-44 

New Unite! airlines Office Vol.1 No. 9- 6- 1-44 

Ballard aircraft Co., Inc. Locates Vrestern 

Office Here Vol.1 No. 11- 6-15-44 

New Air Service Soon Says United Air Lines Vol.1 No. 12- 6-22-44 

Chamber Favors Freeway Move For Airport 

Expansion West Vol.1 No. 12- 6-22-44 

Extension of San Francisco Airport Underway 

at Present Vol.1 lie. 15- 7-13-44 

Pan American Airways Announces Expanded Services Vol.1 No. 15- 7-13-44 

Proposed New Air Service Here Vol.1 No. 15- 7-13-44 

Oakland Launches Five-ZPint Program on 

Postwar Aviation Vol.1 No. 16- 7-20-44 

Pan American Move Vol.1 No. 20- 8-17-44 

Extension of Hawaii Air Service Urged by 

S.F. Cahmber ' Vol.1 No. 20- 8-17-44 

Western Air Opens Office Vol.1 No. 23- d-23-44 

Expanded S.F. -L.A. Air Service announced 

by Western Air Vol.1 No. 24- 9-14-44 

Airlines Contract for High Speed Transoorts Vol.1 No. 25- 9-21-44 

Oakland Airport Improvements Told Vol.1 No. 25- 9-21-44 

AAF Seeks Names of Aircraft Subcontractors 

and Suppliers Vol.1 No. 26- 9-28-44 

Page 1 



INDEX 

BAY REGION BUSINESS 
1944 

AIR TRANSPORTATION. Cont'd. 

Alaskan Air Route Vol.1 No . 29-10-19-44 

CAB Exhibit On Extension of airline Routes 

Filed by Chamber for Hearing Vol.1 No. 31-11- 2-44 

CAB Hearing Continues on West Coast Case Vol.1 No. 32-11- 9-44 

Air Line Promotes Bay Area in December Advertising Vol.1 No. 33-11-16-44 

Hearings on West Coast Case Completed; 

12 Airlines Testify Vol.1 No. 54-11-^3-44 

ALAMEDA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 

Alameda Chamber Organizes For Recruiting Men For 

Service in State Guard Company Vol.1 No. 3 5-11- 30-44 

Six New Directors Elected by Alameda Chamber; 

12 re-elected Vol.1 No. 39-12-28-44 

ALAMEDA TlJ.ES STAR 

Alameda Times-Star Annual Edition Out Vol.1 No. 10- 6- 8-44 

AMENDMENTS 

Amendment to Supreme Court Representation 

Selection Proposed Vol.1 No. 8- 5-25-44 

Federal Aid Road Act Amendment Passage 

Analyzed by Turlington .Vol.1 No. 39-12-28-44 

AMES AERONAUTICAL RESEARCH LABORATORY 

Dedication Ceremonies Held ;it uoffett Fiela 

for Ames Laboratory Vol.1 No. 10- 6- 8-44 

AMERICAN CITIZENSHIP WEEK 

I am an American Day Vol.1 No. 7- 5-18-44 

AMERICAN COUNCIL ON PUBLIC RELATIONS 

Public Relations Group Establishes Bay Area 

Chapter; Falk Praises Vol.1 No. 24- 9-14-44 

ANNIVERSARY 

San Francisco Birthday Lunch to be Held 

Thursday, June 29 Vol.1 No. 12- 6-22-44 

San Francisco's Birthday Vol.1 No. 13- 6-22-44 

ANNUAL REPORT 

Chamber Annual Report Complimented BacK East Vol.1 No. 2- 4-13-44 

APPAREL CENTER 

®4, 000, 000 Apparel Center Slated for San Francisco; 

Will Cover 25 acres Vol.1 No. 21- 8-24-44 

Apparel City Acquires Site At Hunter's Point Vol.1 No. 31-11- 2-44 

New Apparel City, Inc., Completes Purchase of 

25 Acre Site for Project'. Vol.1 No. 37-12-14-44 



Page 2 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 
..San Francisco Public Library 



http://www.archive.org/details/bayregionbusines11944sanf 



INDEX 

BAY REGION BUSINESS 
1944 

BERKELEY C. OF C. 

Schofield Named Director on Berkeley Chamber Board Vol.1 No. 12- 6-22-44 

Berkeley Chamber Plans for Maintenance, High 

Postwar Industrial Level Vol.1 No. 12- 8-24-44 

Berkeley C. of C. Area-Wide Plan Vol.1 No. 22- 8-31-44 

Berkeley C. of C. States Postwar Policies Vol.1 No. 24- 9-14-44 

Berkeley C. of C. Surveys Postwar Job Needs Vol.1 No.^5- 9-21-44 

Educational Hearing Held in Berkeley Vol.1 No. 29-10-13-44 

Sarber Appointed Head Transposition Groups Vol.1 No. 50-10-26-44 

Berkeley Postwar Expansion Vol.1 No. 52-11- 9-44 

Civic Recognition Dinner Held at Berkeley for 

Maury Read Vol.1 No. 33-11-16-44 

Eleven Berkeleyans Elected to Chamber Board 

of Cirectors Vol.1 No. 36-12-14-44 

JAMES B. BLACK 

Jaiaes B. Black Appointment Vol.1 No. 50-10-26-44 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS, C. OF C. 

C. of C. Board Members to Meet Weekly With 

S.F. Suoervisors Vol.1 No. 15- 6-22-44 

Board of Directors Notes Vol.1 No. 17- 7-27-44 

Board Gets "Taste" of California Production Vol.1 No. 17- 7-27-44 

C. of C. Directors at Supervisors' Meetings Vol.1 No. 18- 8- 5-44 

Board Members at Supervisors' Meeting Vol.1 No. 19- 8-10-44 

Board of Directors NOTES Vol.1 Mo. 20- 8 

Board Members at Supervisors' Meeting Vol.1 No. 20- 8-17-44 

"oard Members at Supervisors' Meeting Vol.1 No. 21- 8-24-44 

Board Members at Supervisors' Meeting Vol.1 No. 22- 8-31-44 

Board of Directors Notes Vol.1 No.24- 9-14-44 

C. of C. Representatives at Suoervisors' Meeting Vol.1 No.24- 9-14-44 

C. cf C. Representatives at Supervisors' Meeting Vol.1 No. 25- 9-21-44 

C. of C. Representatives at Supervisors' Meeting Vol.1 No. 26- 9-28-44 

C. of C. Representatives at Supervisors' Meeting Vol.1 No. 27-10- 5-44 

C. of C. Representatives at Supervisors' Meeting Vol.1 No. 28-10-12-44 

C. of C. Representatives at Supervisors' Meeting Vol.1 No. 30-10-26-44 

C. cf C. Representatives at Supervisors' Meeting Vol.1 No. 31-11- 2-44 

C. of C. Board of Directors Nominated Vol.1 No. 32-11- 9-44 

C. of C. Representatives at Supervisors' Meeting Vol.1 No. 52-11- 9-44 

C. of C. Representatives at Supervisors' Meeting Vol.1 No. 33-11-16-44 

C. cf C. Representatives at Supervisors' Meeting Vol.1 No. 34-11-;; 3-44 

BOISE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 

Boise Chamber Manager Here on Mail Route Change Vol.1 No. 52-11- 9-44 

EUGENE C. BOWES 

Bowes, Planning Head, Leaves Chamber Staff to 

Enter Marine Corps Vol.1 No. 10- 6- 8-44 

Bowes, S. F. C. of C., Raised to Captain in Marine 

Air Corps Vol .1 No . 30-10-26-44 

Page 4 



c. 



I N- D E X 

BAY REGION BUSINESS 
1944 

BRETTON WOODS 

Special Notice Vol.1 No. 39-12-28-44 

BUILDERS OF '.TEST 

Builders of West Appointed Vol.1 No. 13- 6-22-44 



CALIFORNIA CANNING PEACH ASS'N 

Peach Canners' Group Elects 1945 Officers Vol.1 No. 39-12-28-44 

CALIFORNIA FARM BUREAU FEDERATION 

Farm Bureau Federation Meet Vol.1 No. 33-11-16-44 

CALIFORNIA STAPE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 

Robinson to Head State C. of C Vol.1 No. 11- 6-15-44 

CALIFORNIA WOOL GROOVERS 

California Wool Growers Group Meet in S.F. Today Vol.1 Mo. 3 5-11-16-44 

CaMPaIGNS 

California Onion Surplus is Cause for Bay Region 

Campaign Vol.1 No. 26- 9-26-44 

1,000 Firms and Unions Contribute to Victory 

Manpower Campaign Vol.1 No. 31-11- 2-44 

CAN C ACS 

Cancacs Officers Attend Valley Meeting at Fresno Vol.1 No. 4- 4-20-44 

Anti-Fraud Campaign Underway for Business in 

Northern California Vol.1 Wo. 20- 8-17-44 

CANCACS Honored at Meet Here; Group Votes Change 

in Name Vol.1 No. 32-11- 9-44 

Chamber of Commerce Meet Here Vol.1 No. 33-11-16-44 

C. of C. Association Elects 1945 Officers; 

Behrens is President Vol.1 No. 37-12-14-44 

Tribute to Past President Freeman Vol.1 No. 37-12-14-44 

CARDINAL'S PORTRalT 

The Cardinal's Portrait Vol.1 No. 8- 5-25-44 

CENTENNIALS 

Telegraphic Centennial of Special Import Here Vol.1 No. 19- 8-10-44 

C <T C. PRESIDENT 

C. of C. President Falk Elected to California 

State Chamber Board Vol.1 No. 7- 5-18-44 

Falk Praises Mayor on Success of Railway 

Purchase Proposal Vol.1 No. 8- 5-25-44 



Page 5 



INDEX 

BAY REGION BUSINESS 
1944 

CHINA AIRCRAFT CORPORATION 

China Aircraft Plant Established in S.F Vol.1 No. 14- 7- 6-44 

Production Underway Now at China Aircraft, 

San Francisco Vol.1 i:o.20- 8-17-44 

CHINA - AMERICAN COUNCIL 

China - American Council Head Urges Preparation 

For Postwar China Trade *. Vol.1 No. 4- 4-27-44 

Position of Bay Region for Future China Trade 

Told by Ambassador Vol.1 No. 15- 7-13-44 

CHRISTMAS 

Christmas Pageant to be Held at Opera House, Dec. 19 Vol.1 No. 37-12-14-44 

a Message From the Philippines Vol.1 No. 37-12-14-44 

CITIZENS' CHRISTMAS COMCTTTEE 

Christmas Committee for Service Men and Women 

Formed by C. of C Vol.1 No . 34-11-23-44 

Get Gifts for Servicemen Now Asks Christmas 

Committee Vol.1 No. 35-11-50-44 

CITY OF PARIS 

New City of Paris Store Vol . 1 Ho . 6- 5 

Projects For Postwar Period Exhibited Here 

City of Paris Window Vol.1 No. 9- 6- 1-44 

•Road Map' Exhibit Changes Vol.1 No. 10- 6- 8-44 

City of Paris Shows New Postwar Plan Projects Vol.1 No. 10- 6-15-44 

City of Paris Exhibit Vol.1 No. 12- 6-22-44 

Postwar Plan Displayed Vol.1 No. 13- 6-22-44 

'Parking Reservoirs' Wind Up C. of C. - 

City of Paris Exhibit Vol.1 No. 17- 7-27-44 

COAST GUA RD 

Volunteers Needed by Port Security Force Vol.1 No. 22- 8-31-44 

CC.:..ITTEE FOR ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 

Businessmen Asked to Return Questionnaires 

by C.E.D. Chairman Vol.1 No. 15- 6-29-44 

Fisher Announced Chairman Oakland C.E.D. Committee Vol.1 Ko.16- 7-20-44 

Eerkeley Expansion Told Vol.1 No. 19- 8-10-44 

C.E.D. Announces Federal Tax Plan Vol.1 No. 24- 9-14-44 

C.E.D. Survey Shows 50% More Jobs in S.F. After War Vol.1 No. 36-12-14-44 

C.E.D. Handbooks for S.F. Businessmen Available at C. of CVol.l No. 37-12-14-44 
Charles Page is S.F. Chairman, C.E.D.; Program 

is Stepped Up Vol.1 No. 37-12-14-44 

CONFERENCES 

Eerkeley-Oakland Plan Series of Inter-City 

Luncheon Conferences Vol.1 No. 4- 4-2C-44 

California Industry Meet Set For Tuesday, 

May 9th, to Feature Reconversion Vol.1 No. 4- 4-27-44 

Page 6 



IHEEX 

Bill REGION BUSINESS 
1944 

CONFERENCES. Cont'd. 

Chamber Stand on Monetary Plan Vol.1 No. 15- 7-13-44 

Northern California Meet Vol.1 No. 26- 9-28-44 

Area Unity Conference Vol.1 No. 27-10- 5-44 

Cattlemen's Group Meeting to be Held in Fresno Vol.1 No. 34-11-23-44 

Permanent Aviation Conference Vol.1 No. 37-12-14-44 

CONTRACT TERUIKiiTION 

Contract Termination Policies Stated Vol.1 No. 8- 5-25-44 

Contract Termination Instruction Form is in 

Chamber Bulletin Vol.1 No. 9- 6- 1-44 

Contract Termination Procedure Clarified in 

Domestic Trade Bulletin Vol.1 No. 11- 6-15-44 

Four-Day School on Contract Termination to be 

Held in July Vol.1 No. 14- 7- 6-44 

Contract Termination School Ends Tomorrow Vol.1 No. 15- 7-13-44 

Three-Phase Program Launched by C. of C. On 

Contract Termination Vol.1 No. 16- 7-20-44 

Staggered Termination Urged by I.iavericK & Lundborg Vol.1 No. 16- 7-20-44 

Transcript Available. ". Vol.1 No. 17- 7-27-44 

Contractor's Guide Available at C. of C Vol.1 No. 19- 6-10-44 

Contract Termination Vol.1 No. 22- 8-51-44 

Uniform Termination Financing Vol.1 No. 23- 9-23-44 

SWPC Sponsors Contract Termination Meet Friday Vol.1 No. 25- 9-21-44 

Chamber Will Work For Unifrom Conversion 

Throughout Nation Vol.1 No. 28-10-12-44 

Advance Agreements On Termination of Contracts Possible. . .Vol.1 No. 30-10-26-44 
Uniform Termination Regulation Announced by Army 

and Navy Vol.1 No. 33-11-33-44 

CONVENTIONS 

S.F. Hotel-City Action Banning Conventions Serves 

As Example Vol.1 No. 35-11-30-44 



D. 



DEDICATION 

Appraiser's Stores Building Dedicated Vol.1 No. 26- 9-28-44 

DIRECTORIES 

Directory of Social Agencies Published Vol.1 No. 31-11- 2-44 

New Federal Directory Available Now at S. F. 

Chamber Office Vol.1 No. 32-11- 

DOCKAGE CHARGES 

State Port Authorities Suspend Increases in 

Dockage Charges Here Vol.1 No. 6- 5-11-44 

C. of C. Congratulated on Action Preventing 

Lock Rate Increases Vol.1 No. 7- 5-18-44 



Page 7 



E. 



INDEX 

BAY REGION BUSINESS 
1944 

DOMESTIC TRADE 

New Domestic Trade Program Adopted Vol.1 No. 1- 4- 6-44 

Domestic Trade Tips - D-5989 thru D.5995 Vol.1 Mo. 1- 4- 6-44 

Domestic Trade Tips - D-5996 thru D-6001 Vol.1 Ko. 2- 4-13-44 

StocKton Group in San Francisco Guests of 

Chamber Committee Vol.1 No. 4- 4-20-44 

Domestic Trade Tips - D-6002 thru D-6007 Vol.] No. 5- 5- 4-44 

Art and Gift Show Set By Chamber and Mart for 

Last Keek in May Vol.1 No. 7- 5-18-44 

San Francisco Eusinessmen Visit Contra Costa 

County For Good Neighbor Meeting Vol.1 No. 7- 5-18-44 

Domestic Trace Tips - D-6008 thru D-6011 Vol.1 No. 7- 5-18-44 

Domestic Trade Tips - D-6012 thru D-6015 Vol.1 No. 10- 6- 8-44 

Domestic Trade Tips - D-6016 thru D-6022 Vol.1 No. 11- 6-15-44 

Domestic Trade Tips - D-6023 thru D-6026 Vol.1 No. 14- 7- 6-44 

Domestic Trade Tips - D-6028 thru D-6031 Vol.1 No. 15- 7-13-44 

Domestic Trade Tips - D-6032 thru D-6039 Vol.1 No. 19- 8-10-44 

Domestic Trade Tips - D-6040 thru D- 6044 Vol.1 No. 20- 8-17-44 

Domestic Trade Tips - D-6045 thru D-6048 Vol.1 No. 23- 9- 7-44 

Domestic Trade Tips - D-6049 thru D-6051 Vol.1 No. 24- 9-14-44 

Domestic Trade Tips - D-6052 thru D-6056 Vol.1 No. 25- 9-21-44 

Domestic Trade Tips - D-6057 thru D-6063 Vol.1 No. 26- 9-28-44 

Domestic Trade Tips - D-6064 thru D-6069 Vol.1 No. 29-10- 19-44 

Domestic Trade Tips - D-6070 thru D-6072 Vol.1 No. 30-10-26-44 

Investment of Purchase of Refrigeration Business 

Sought Vol.1 No. 30-10-26-44 

Domestic Trade Tips - D-6073 thru D-6075 Vol.1 No. 33-11-16-44 

Domestic Trade Tips - D-6076 thru D-6087 Vol.1 No. 35-11-30-44 

Domestic Trade Tips - D-6079 thru D-6080 Vol.1 No. 37-12-14-44 

Progress Reported in Annual Domestic Trade 

Group Report Vol.1 No. 3 7-1 2-14-44 

Domestic Trade Tips - D-6081 thru D-6082 Vol.1 No. 38-12-21-44 

Domestic Trace Tips - D-6083 thru D-6084 Vol.1 No. 39-12-28-44 

S.F. Chamber Adds Market Analyst to Domestic 

Trade Staff ' Vol.1 No. 39-12-28-44 



ELLIOTT AMENDMENT 

Sacramento and Visalia Thank Chamber For Help 

on Central Valley Issue Vol.1 No. 7- 5-18-44 

EMERYVILLE 

Emeryville In-Plant Feeding Studied Vol.1 No. 32-11- j-44 

EMPLOYMENT 

Applicants for Position in Bay Area Concerns 

Listed by C. of C. Dep't Vol.1 No. 10- 6- 8-44 



INDEX 

BAY REGION BUSINESS 
1944 

EXHIBITS 

Art and Gift Show Here Termed a Great Success Vol.1 No. 10- 6- 8-44 

"America at War" Mural Vol.1 No. 10- 6- 8-44 

Barcelona Sample Fair Shows Exhibit of U.S. 

Life and Industries Vol.1 No. 11- 6-15-44 

Statistical Exhibit Filed Kith CAB For West 

Coast Case Vol.1 No. 21- 6-24-44 

Christmas Exhibit at Mart Vol.1 No. 24- 9-14-44 



FACTORIES 

New Novelty Firm Here Vol.1 No. 7- 5-18-44 

Western Crown Cork and Seal Co. Announces 

San Francisco Factory Vol.1 No. 11- 6-15-44 

Redwood City Firm Purchases Los Angeles 

Rubber Plant Vol.1 No. 16- 7-20-44 

Eastern Packer Wants to Buy Plant Here Vol.1 No. 16- 7-20-44 

New Bay Area Plant Result Kaiser-Standard 

Gypsum Deal Vol.1 No. 17- 7-27-44 

Western Crown Makes Progress on Purchase 

of New Factory Site Vol.1 No. 17- 7-27-44 

New San Jose Factory Vol.1 No. 18- 8- 3-44 

Tartare-Tartaric Plant, Nation's Largest, 

Locates in Oakland Vol.1 No. 19- 8-10-44 

Oakland Pepsi-Cola Plant Vol.1 No. 21- 8-24-44 

Sheet Metal Plant Sought Vol.1 No. 23- 9- 7-44 

Company Plans For Increased Cork Output Vol.1 No. 23- 9- 7-44 

Huge Factory Product Demand in Prospect 

According to Fox Vol.1 No. 25- 9-21-44 

Packing Como^ny Locates Plant Here Vol.1 No . 28-10-12-44 

Factory Interest Here Sought by Detroit Man Vol.1 No . 29-10-19-44 

Glass Containers, Inc., Buys Site for Plant 

at ^tioch, Calif Vol.1 No. 34-11-23-44 

Eastman lag and Label Company Plans Half 

Million Dollar Plant. /. . .' Vol.1 No. 57-12-14-44 

FOREIGN TRADE 

Chamber Named Nation's First To Urge 

Reciprocal Foreign Trade Vol.1 No. 2- 4-13-44 

Oakland Plans Foreign Trade Week Activities 

Climaxed By Banquet Vol.1 No. 4- 4-20-44 

Foreign Trade Tips Called "Dollars ana Cents" Value Vol.1 No. 4- 4-27-44 

Foreign Trade Tips List Available ^ree to Members Vol.1 No. 5- 5- 4-44 

Foreign Trade Promotion on Bay Region Basis Underway Vol.1 No. 6- 5-11-44 

U.S. As iVorld Banker Must Collaborate, Says Foreign 

Trade Speaker Vol.1 No. 8- 5-25-44 

Oakland and Eerkeley Join in Celebration of Foreign 

Trade Week Vol.1 No. 8- 5-25-44 

Foreign Trade Tips Vol.1 No. 12- 6-22-44 

Need For Port Volunteers Told to Foreign Trade Group Vol.1 No. 12- 6-22-44 

Page 9 



INDEX 

BaY REGION BUSINESS 
1944 

FOREIGN TRACE, Cont'd. 

Foreign Trade Tips- 3295 thru 3303 Vol.1 No. 14- 7- 6-44 

Foreign Trade Tips- 3304 thru 3318 Vol.1 No. 15- 7-13-44 

Foreign Trade Tips- 3319 thru 3329 Vol.1 No. 16- 7-20-44 

Foreign Trade Tips- 3330 thru 3345 Vol.1 No. 17- 7-27-44 

Foreign Trade Tips- 3349 thru 3365 Vol.1 Mo. 18- 8- 3-44 

Officers, Junior Foreign Trade Association Announced Vol.1 No. 19- 8-10-44 

Foreign Trade Tips- 3370 thru 3382 Vol.1 No. 19- 8- 

Foreign Trade Tips- 3382 thru 3398 Vol.1 No. 20- 8-17-44 

Foreign Trade Tips- 3399 thru 3409 Vol.1 No. 21- 8-24-44 

Foreign Trade Tips- 3410 thru 3419 Vol.1 No. 22- 8-31-44 

31st National Foreign Trade Convention Set 

For October 9,10 and 11 Vol.1 No. 22- 6-31-44 

Luncheon Celebrating Brazil's Independence to 

be Held Today Vol.1 No. 23- 9- 7-44 

Foreign Trade Tips- 3420 thru 3437 Vol.1 No. 23- 9- 7-44 

Foreign Trade Tips- 3437 thru 3451 Vol.1 No. 24- 9-14-44 

Y.'arehouse Space Obtained for Over Guota Coffee Storage.... Vol.1 No. 25- 9-21-44 

Foreign Trade Tips- 3452 thru 3472 Vol.1 No. 25- 9-21-44 

Foreign Trade Tips- 3473 thru 3489 Vol.1 No. 26- 9-28-44 

Foreign Trade Tips- o4a0 thru 3510 Vol.1 No.27-lC- ! — 

Foreign Trade Tips- 3511 thru 3553 Vol.1 No. 28-10-12-44 

Foreign Trade Tips- 3554 thru 3551 Vol.1 No. 29-10-19-44 

Foreign Traae Tips- 3553 thru 3568 Vol.1 No. 30-10-26-44 

Foreign Trade Tips- 3568 thru 3582 Vol.1 No. 51-11- 2-44 

Foreign Trade Tips- 3583 thru 3594 Vol.1 No. 32-11- 9-44 

Foreign Trade Tips- 3595 thru 3609 Vol.1 No. 35-11-16-44 

Foreign Trade Tips- 3610 thru 3632 Vol.1 No. 34-11-25-44 

Foreign Trade Tips- 3633 thru 3644 Vol.1 No. 35-11-30-44 

Foreign Trade Tips- 3648 thru 3667 Vol.1 No. 36-12- 7-44 

Kenneth Campbell Appointed Chamber World 

Trade Manager Vol.1 No. 36-12- 14-44 

Foreign Trade Tips- 3668 thru 3685 Vol.1 No. 37-12-14-44 

Foreign Trade Group Executive Committee for 

1945 Elected . . . '. Vol.1 No .37-12-14-44 

Foreign Trace Tips- 3686 thru 3697 Vol.1 No. 38-12-21-44 

Foreign Trade Tips- 5698 thru 5712 Vol.1 No. 39-12-28-44 

FOREIGN TRADE POLICIES 

Chamber Stand on Monetary Plan Vol.1 No. 15- 7-13-44 

The Philippines * Vol.1 No. 16- 7-20-44 

Foreign Economic administration Vol.1 No. 17- 7-27-44 

Policies on Government Purchasing and 

Selling Agencies Announced Vol .1 No . 19- 8-10-44 

Oakland Chamber Supports V.orld Trade Center Vol.1 No. 20- 8-17-44 

Position Taken on International Cartels by C. of C Vol.1 No. 20- 8-17-44 

Imports Stockpiling, Foreign Trade Promotion 

Urges C. of C Vol.1 No. 21- 8-21-44 

U.S. -United Kingdom Mutual Aid Agreement Favored 

by C. of C Vol.1 No. 22- 8-31-44 

Foreign Trade Policies - China-O.S. Treaty 

Lend Lease Program TXTTTTTTTT , TTTT ^ Vol.1 No. 23- 9- 7-44 






INDEX 

BAY REGION BDSINESS 
1944 

FOREIGN TRADE POLICIES, Cont'd . 

Keep Adequate Merchant Marine, Says Chamber 

in Policy Declaration Vol.1 No. 25- 9-21-44 

Gunnison, C. of C. Pacific Traae Representative Vol.1 No. 26-10- 5-44 

Montgomery Leaves C. of C, Directs China- American 

Council Here Vol.1 No. 27-10- 5-44 

Reciprocal Trade Policy Reaffirmed by Chamber Vol.1 No. 27-10- 5-44 

Foreign Trade Council Uses C. of C. Policies Vol.1 No. 29-10-19-44 

FOREIGN TRADE - University o f S. F. Program 

University of San Fr ancisco Starts Far Eastern Program. Vol.1 No. 27-10- 5-44 

FRESNO 

Chamber Action Endorsed Vol.1 No. 5- 5- 4-44 

FRIDEN CALCULATING MACHINE COMPANY, INC . 

San Leandro Company Expands Eastern Office Vol.1 No. 29-10-19-44 



G. 



H. 



GANTNER & MATTERN CO . 

Company Erochure Praised by Lundborg Vol.1 No. 28-10-12-44 

GENERAL MOTORS 

New Plant Located in Emeryville by G. M Vol.1 No. 1- 4- 6-44 

GOOD NEIGHBOR PROGRAM 

Good Neighbor Visit to Alameda Made by S. F. Chamber.. . .Vol.1 No. 1- 4- 6-44 
Good Neighbor Visit Paid to Richmond by Chamber Group. ..Vol.1 No. 11- 6-15-44 
Sacramento C. of C. Officials to be Guests of 

S. F. Chamber Vol.1 No. 23- 9- 7-44 

Watsonville C. of C. Directors Attend Board 

Meeting Here Vol.1 No. 24- 9-14-44 

International Training Program Vol.1 No. 26- 9-28-44 

C. of C. Group Visits Stockton for "Good Neighbor" 

Meeting Vol.1 No. 29-10-19-44 

G. I. BILL OF RIGHTS 

"G. I. Eill of Rights" Copies Available at Chamber 

Offices Vol.1 No. 17- 7-27-44 

W. R. GRACE & COMPANY 

Steamship Co. Plans Postwar Transpacific Service 

From S.F Vol.1 No .37-12-14-44 

HENRY F. GRADY 

Grady Chosen as One of Six Delegates to 

International Meet Vol.1 No. 32-11- 9-44 



HALVORFOLD-Kwikprint Co. 

Attention, California Chambersl Vol.1 No. 15- 7-13-44 



. 



INDEX 

BAY REGION BUSINESS 
1944 

HARBOR DAY 

Annual Harbor Day Celebration Planned Vol.1 No. 21- 8-24-44 

HIGHWAYS 

C. of C. Board Approves Street, Highway Policies 

of 0. S. Chamber Vol.1 No. 13- 6-22-44 

New Yosemite Highway Discussed at Meet Here Vol.1 No. 15- 7-13-44 

Modesto-Yosemite Highway Plan Approved by 

S. F. C. of C Vol.1 No. 24- 9-14-44 

Support Pledged For Federal 

HIGHWAY COMMISSION 

Highway Commission Votes More Funds For Road 

Repairs Vol.1 No .13- 6-22-44 

Freeway Move Approved by Highway Commission Vol.1 No. 26- 9-28-44 

HONOL0LU 

San Francisco Surveyed by Honolulu Chamber Vol.1 No. 16- 7-20-44 

HOSPITALITY 

Welcome to Dr. Henry F. Grady is Scheduled 

For Near Future Vol.1 No. 1- 4- 6-44 

Ching Urges Agreement Without Government Aid Vol.1 No. 2- 4-13-44 

Grady Speaks to Chamber On European Devastation Vol.1 No. 4- 4-20-44 

Three Favorite Sons Vol.1 No. 4- 4-20-44 

Major Chamber Luncheon to be Held Thursday, May 4 Vol.1 No. 4- 4-20-44 

May 4 Luncheon is "Unique" Says Falk Vol.1 No. 4- 4-27-44 

Thoughts For Foreign Traders - Wilbert Ward Vol.1 No. 6- 5-11-44 

Lunch Speaker - Wilbert Ward Vol.1 No. 7- 5-11-44 

Biographical Sketch of Lunch Speaker, Wilbert Ward Vol.1 No. 7- 5-11-44 

Maj-Gen. Frederick Gilbreath (cancelled) Vol.1 No. 10- 6- 8-44 

L. Deming Tilton Vol.1 No. 13- 6-22-44 

Tilton, Planning Expert, to Speak at C. of C. Lunch Vol.1 No. 14- 7- 6-44 

Tilton, City Planner, Outlines Plans for the 

Future San Francisco Vol.1 No. 16- 7-20-44 

Luncheon Announcement - See Page 3 - Marsh Vol.1 No. 19- 8-10-44 

A Message From Chester Bowles Vol.1 No. 19- 8-10-44 

Bowles to Discuss Reconversion and CPA at 

Commercial Club Vol.1 No. 20- 8-17-44 

Bowles, Tomorrow's Speaker, Has Newspaper, 

Advertising Background Vol.1 No. 21- 8-24-44 

Hon. Joesph R. Farrington Vol.1 No. 23- 9- 7-44 

Rear Admiral Carleton H. Wright Vol.1 No. 29-10-19-44 

Rear Admiral Wright Speaks at Tomorrow's Navy 

Day Lunch Vol.1 No. 30-10-26-44 

Admiral Wright Gives Praise to War Job Done Here Vol.1 No. 31-11- 2-44 

Admiral Royal Eason Ingersoll, U.S.N Vol.1 No. 34-11-23-44 

Admiral Ingersoll to Speak Here Today Vol.1 No. 35-11-30-44 

S. F. Chamber Honors City Delegation to 

Legislature at Dinner Vol.1 No. 39-12-28-44 

Page 12 






. 



INDEX 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 
1944 



HOUSING' FACILITIES 

Workers Housed in Units in 2 Bay Counties 

Total 40,000 Vol.1 No. 12- 6-22-44 

Postwar Sessions Held in Oakland to Plan 

For Housing Industry Vol.1 No. 13- 6-22-44 

Bay Area War Housing Program Vol.1 No. IE- 7-13-44 

Hotel Importance to Current San Francisco 

Told by Chamber Vol.1 No. 20- 8-17-44 

Loss of Four Hotels Would Cripple City 

According to Report Vol.1 No. 21- 8-24-44 

Chamber Congratulated on Efforts Against 

Hotel Seizure Vol.1 No. 22- 8-31-44 

Army Abandons Plan to Take Over Hotels Vol.1 No. 23- 9- 7-44 

Bay Area 1945 Housing Opportunities Vol.1 No. 30-10-26-44 



INDUSTRIAL 

Industrial Hearing by Senate Committee for 

November 16,17,18 Vol.1 No. 33-11-16-44 

American Hospital Supply Corporation Locates 

in San Francisco Vol.1 No. 34-11-23-44 

Chrysler Motors Corporation Purchases Large 

Industrial Site at San Leandro, California Vol.1 No. 34-11-23-44 

San Leandro C. of C. Praised for Efforts on 

Industry Site Purchase Vol.1 No. 35-11-30-44 

Facilities Expansion in State Near Three Billion Vol.1 No. 35-11-30-44 

C. of C. Representatives Plan for Bay Area Promotion. .. .Vol.1 No. 37-12-14-44 

INDUSTRIAL DEPARTMENT 

Albert M. Dunfee Joins Industrial Dep't. as 

G. L. Fox Assistant Vol.1 No. 1- 4- 6-44 

Bay Area Dominates in March Ship Deliveries Vol.1 No. 4- 4-27-44 

New Western Branch Vol.1 No. 7- 5-18-44 

Eastern Industry Plans Expansion West, says 

Oakland C. of C. Man Vol.1 No. 10- 6- 8-44 

Cotton Textile Industry Survey Planned at 

Bakersfield Meeting Vol.1 No. 15- 7-13-44 

Trans-Pacific Representation Vol.1 No. 22- 8-31-44 

Ohioan Wants Business Here Vol.1 No. 24- 9-14-44 

Factory or Mercantile Business Wanted Here Vol.1 No. 24- 9-14-44 

New Product Available Vol.1 No. 25- 9-21-44 

Small Manufacturing Business Sought in 

Bay Region Vol.1 No. 25- 9-21-44 

Fox Talk at Stockton Vol.1 No. 26- 9-28-44 

California Cotton Production Opportunities 

Under Study Vol . 1 No . 29-10-19-44 

Subsidy Limitation Bill Supported by Chamber Vol.1 No.30-lC-26-44 

French Supply Mission Interested in S. F. Bay 

Region Manufactures Vol.1 No. 32-11- 9-44 

Page 13 















. 



INDEX 

BAY REGION BDSINESS 
1944 

INDUSTRIAL DEPARTMENT. Cont'd . 

Business Wanted Listed by C. of C. 

Industrial Department Vol.1 No. 32-11- 9-44 

Bay Area Industry Expansion Vol.1 No. 32-11- 9-44 

Business Wanted Listed bu C. of C. 

Industrial Dept Vol .1 No. 33-11-16-44 

Chamber Industrial Manager Meets With 

Mountain States Group Vol.1 No. 33-11-16-44 

California Leads in Jobs for War Veterans, 

According to Survey Vol.1 No. 35-11-30-44 

ERNEST INGOLD 

Ingold Outlines "Work Pile" at Portland 

Rotary Luncheon Vol.1 No. 4- 4-20-44 

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MACHINE 

I.B.M. at San Jose Vol.1 No. 28-10-12-44 

INTER STATE COMMERCE COMMISSION 

Midwest Meat Packers Seek Lower Rail Rates Vol.1 No. 1- 4- 6-44 

C. of C.'s Charge Bias in Meat Rate Case Vol.1 No. 26- 9-28-44 



JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER 

Jewish Community Center Vol.1 No. 30-10-26-44 

JUNIOR CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 

Walker to Speak at Junior C. of C Vol.1 No. 23- 9- 7-44 

Symposium on China to Start September 18 Vol.1 No. 24- 9-14-44 

Junior C. of C.'s Plan Exposition Manufacturing 

Industry Here Vol.1 No. 30-10-26-44 

Junior Chamber Gives Symposium on Russia Vol.1 No. 31-11- 2-44 

Junior C. of C. Industry Exposition Approved Vol.1 No. 30-11- 2-44 

Open Golf Tournament Vol.1 No . 34-11-23-44 

U. S. Junior Chamber Veterans Chairman Speaks 

Here Tuesday Vol.1 No. 35-11-30-44 

S. F. Junior Chamber Elects 15 Members to Board of 

Directors Vol.1 No .37-12-14-44 

Junior Chamber of Commerce Elects Officers for 1945 Vol.1 No. 39-12-28-44 



KERN COUNTY C. OF C. 

Kern County C. of C. Publishes Monthly Business 

Analysis Vol .1 No . 28-10-12-44 

KIWANIS (SAN FRANCISCO) 

San Francisco Kiwanis Elects Mills as Head Vol.1 No. 29-10-19-44 



Page 14 



L. 



INDEX 

BAY REGION BUSINESS 
1944 



LABOR 

Census of Bay Region Labor Force Will be 

Taken Soon Vol.1 No. 1- 4- 6- 44 

Policy on 1945 Farm Labor Procurement to be 

Same as 1944 Vol.1 No. 35-11-16-44 

LEGISLATION (General) 

State Acts Against Chamber-Opposed Federal 

Measures Vol.1 No. 11- 6-15-44 

LIBRARY SERVICE 

Library Service for Businessmen Praised Vol.1 No. 21- 8-24-44 

LOUIS B. LUNDBORG 

Lundborg Meets With Salt Lake City Leaders Vol.1 No. 9- 6- 1-44 

Lundborg Conducts Course Vol.1 No. 12- 6-22-44 

Public Relations and Community - Subject 

of Lundborg Lectures Vol.1 No. 14- 7- 6-44 

Flash Vol.1 No. 14- 7- 6-44 

Lundborg at Stockton Vol.1 No. 26- 9-28-44 

Lundborg to be Guest of Honor at Hi-Jinx Vol.1 No. 32-11- 9-44 

Nationwide Interest Evinced in Booklet by 

Chamber Manager Vol.1 No. 33-11-16-44 



MADERA CANAL 

Ceremony Held at Friant Dam for Dedication, 

Madera Canal Vol.1 No. 10- 6- 8-44 

MANPOWER 

Manpower Meeting Vol.1 No. 20- 8-17-44 

MARKET STREET RAILWAY 

Market Street Railway Purchase Urged Vol.1 No. 4- 4-20-44 

Market S treet Group Approves C. of C. Stand 

on "Right to Work" Vol.1 No. 5- 5- 4-44 

Eill to Prevent Delay on Trolley Deal Passed Vol.1 No. 12- 6-22-44 

MARKET WEEK 

Furniture and Home Goods Market Week Starts 

July 24 Vol.1 No. 16- 7-20-44 

Appliances Clinic Held at Mart Vol.1 No. 17- 7-27-44 

Women's Apparel Market Week, August 6 to 10 Vol.1 No. 18- 8- 3-44 

Buyers Attendance Heavy at Apparel Market Week Here Vol.1 No. 19- 8-10-44 

Spring Apparel Market Set for November Vol.1 No . 29-10-19-44 

Merchandise Mart to Hold Spring Market 

Week February 5-10 Vol.1 No. 33-11-16-44 

Page 15 



INDEX 

BAY REGION BUSINESS 
1944 

MARKET WEEK, Cont'd . 

Gift and Art Show Set For February 8-11 Vol.1 No.. 35-11-30-44 

"What's Ahead" - Slogan for Spring Market Show Vol.1 No. 37-12-14-44 

MASTER PLUMBERS 

Master Plumbers Association Vol.1 No. 15- 7-13-44 

MEMBERSHIP 

Greater Support From Chamber Members Sought 

in Drive Here Vol.1 No. 27-10- 5-44 

Drive For Greater C. of C. Support Launched 

at Breakfast Vol . 1 No . 28-10-12-44 

Chamber Membership Praised by Local Firm Vol.1 No. 28-10-12-44 

Progress Reported on C. cf C. Drive for 

Greater Support Vol.l No. 29-10-19-44 

Members' Approval of C. of C. W rk Shown by- 
Response to Drive Vol.1 No. 35-11-30-44 

Richard D. Brigham Appointed Chairman 

Membership Group Vol.1 No. 6- 5-11-44 

Chamber Gives D. S. Senate Committee Business Views Vol.1 No. 18- 8- 3-44 

Membership Questionnaire Results Vol.l No. 19- 8-10-44 

Chamber Gives D. S. Senate Committee Eusiness Views Vol.l No. 19- 8-10-44 

Member for 64 Years Renews Subscription Vol.l No. 25- 9-21-44 

John Ek Named New Head of Membership Department Vol.1 No. 37-12-14-44 

Richard Brigham' s Service to C. of C. Commented 

on by Falk Vol.l No. 39-12-28-44 

MEXICO 

Chamber Opposes River Water Provisions of 

Treaty With Mexico Vol.l No. 1- 4- 6-44 

Special Notice - National Railways of Mexico Vol.l No. 16- 7-20-44 

S. F. to Keep Office of National Railway of Mexico Vol.l No. 25- 9-21-44 

MINING 

Continued Operation of Aluminum Plant at Riverbank 

to be Sought by Chamber Vol.l No. 2- 4-13-33 

C. of C. Committeemen Named by Governor to 

State Board Vol.l No. 4- 4-27-44 

Central California Groups Demonstrate United 

Front on Industry Developments Vol.l No. 4- 4-27-44 

Mining Committee Plans for Fullest Employment 

in Postwar California Vol.l No. 7- 5-18-44 

Postwar Mining Needs Aired at California 

Legislature Hearing Vol.1 No. 9- 6- 1-44 

Northern California Mercury Producers Make 

New Records ' Vol.l No. 12- 6-22-44 

World Market For U.S. Cold, Urged by C. of C. 

for American Miners Vol.l No. 15- 7-13-44 

Mineral Eulletin Vol.l No. 16- 7-20-44 



Page 16 



INDEX 

BAY REGION BUSINESS 
1944 

MINING, Cont'd. 

WPB Establishes New Policy for Gold 

Mining Firms Vol.1 No. 25- 9-21-44 

Mineral Resources Survey Vol.1 No. 27-10- 5-44 

Minerals Industry Builaing Proposal to be Studied Vol.1 No. 29-10-19-44 

Participation at Mining Meet Vol.1 No. 29-10-19-44 

Mining Industry Loans Sought by Chamber From 

Federal RFC Vol . 1 No . 30-10-26-44 

Mineral Output Vol .1 No . 30-10-26-44 

M0DEST0-Y0SEMITE AIRLINE HIGHWAY 

Berkeley Chamber Supports Highway Link Vol.1 No. 20- 8-17-44 

WILLIAM L. MONTGOMERY 

Montgomery, Soon to Leave Chamber, Returns From East. .. .Vol.1 No. 30-10-26-44 

MOORE DRY DOCKS 

Moore Dry Docks Expansion Vol.1 No. 33-11-16-44 

MUSIC FESTIVALS 

Music Festivals Held in Sigmund Stern Grove Vol.1 No. 11- 6-15-44 



Mc 
N. 



0. 



NAPA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 

Rally Held by Napa Chamber to Launch 

Postwar Program Vol.1 No. 2- 4-13-44 

NAVAL AFFAIRS GROUP 

Naval Affairs Group Visits Treasure Island Vol.1 No. 10- 6- 8-44 

NEWS DIGEST 

Current Bay Region News Digest Vol.1 No. 5- 5- 4-44 

NORTHERN CALIFORNIA FOOD PROCESSORS FOUNDATION 

Food Foundation Starts Vol.1 No. 25- 9-21-44 



OAKLAND CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 

Oakland Traffic Manager East to Confer on 

Bay Area Matters Vol.1 No. 32-11- 9-44 

Oakland C. of C. Elects Nine New Directors Vol.1 No. 36-12-14-44 

Survey of Alameda County Dwelling Unite 

Shows Total of 187,203 Vol.1 No. 37-12- 14-44 

J. Sowers to Oakland C. of C. World Trade Post Vol.1 No. 39-12-28-44 

OAKLAND FOREIGN TRADE AND HARBOR CLUB 

Oakland Address Vol.1 No. 31-11- 2-44 



Page 17 



INDEX 

' BAY REGION BUSINESS 
1944 

OAKLAND'S PLAN FOR THE FUTURE 

Oakland Plans for the Future Include 4 

Area-Wide Surveys Vol.1 No. 7- 5-18-44 

Veterans Information Center Proposed by Belgrano Vol.1 No. 22- 8-31-44 

OPT (OFFICE OF DEFENSE TRANSPORT A HON) 

"Stay on the Job" - DDT Vol.1 No. 12- 6-22-44 

New ODT Official Vol.1 No. 39-12-28-44 

OPA (OFFICE OF PRICE ADMINISTRATION) 

Price Ceiling Protest Deadline is Extended Vol.1 No. 2- 4-13-33 

Chamber Recommends 7-point Plan for OPA 

Price Controls ' Vol.1 No. 4- 4-27-44 

Noble Named to OPA Group Vol.1 No. 8- 5-25-44 

Three OPA Appointments of Bay Area Men Announced Vol.1 No. 11- 6-15-44 

Three San Franciscans Named to OPA Group Vol.1 No. 13- 6-22-44 

Bay Region Men Appointed to Government Agencies 

Industry Advisory Group Vol.1 No. 16- 7-20-44 

OPA Appoints Five Bay Region Men Vol.1 No. 20- 8-17-44 

Bay Area Men Named to OPA Positions Vol.1 No. 22- 8-31-44 



P. 



PAJARO VALLEY 

Pajaro Valley Chamber Sponsors Area Meeting Vol.1 No. 21- 8-24-44 

Pajaro Chamber Elects Officers} Colgrove 

Named 1945 President Vol.1 No. 39-12-28-44 

PAN AMERICAN DAY 

Pan American Celebration Held in kure!ca, April 3 Vol.1 No. 2- 4-13-44 

J. C. PENNY CO. 

New Penny's Store in S. F. is Largest in 

National Chain Vol.1 No. 12- 6-22-44 

PLASTICS 

Course on Plastics Offered by California 

Extension Division Vol.1 No. 2- 4-13-44 

POPDLATION 

South San Francisco up 72 percent in Population Vol.1 No. 4- 4-27-44 

Comparative Statistical Data Vol.1 No. 7- 5-18-44 

Comparative Statistical Data Vol.1 No. 8- 5-25-44 

Comparative Statistical Data Vol.1 No. 11- 6-15-44 

Comparative Statistical Data T Vol.1 No. 12- 6-22-44 

Release of True Population Figure for 

S. F. Explained Vol.1 No. 20- 8-17-44 

Comparative Statistical Data Vol.1 No. 20- 8-17-44 

Comparative Statistical Data Vol.1 No. 21- 8-24-44 

Comparative Statistical Data Vol.1 No. 22- 8-31-44 



Page 18 



INDEX 

BAY REGION BUSINESS 
1944 

PORT CHICAGO 

Port Chicago Offered Aid by C. of C. in 

Expediting Community Rebuilding Vol.1 No. 17- 8-24-44 

Martinez Praises C. of C- Aid on Port 

Chicago Claims Bill Vol.1 No. 21- 8-24-44 

POSTWAR PLAN 

Chamber Approves Seven-Point Postwar 

International Policy Vol.1 No. 4- 4-27-44 

Postwar Congress of Industry Trade and 

Finance Planned Here Vol.1 No. 7- 5-18-44 

State Commission to Survey Postwar Rebuilding 

Needs of Richmond as Example City Vol.1 No. 8- 5-25-44 

Sacramento C. of C. Announces Results of 

Postwar Job Survey Vol.1 No. 9- 6- 1-44 

State Office Located Here for Bay Region 

Postwar Activities Vol.1 No. 15- 7-13-44 

Small Business Hearing by Senator Murray Set 

for July 31 to August 1 Vol.1 No. 16- 7-20-44 

Small Business Hearing Here Set for July and 

August 1 Vol.1 No. 17- 7-27-44 

Postwar Jobs, Subject of Small Business 

Hearing in San Francisco Vol.1 No. 18- 8- 3-44 

Equal Opportunities Asked for Workers in 

Postwar Jobs Here Vol.1 No. 21- 8-24-44 

Postwar Marketing Meeting Here to be Representative 

of Bay Area and West Vol.1 No. 21- 8-24-44 

Postwar Project Hearing Held in Oakland by 

State Group Vol.1 No. 22- 8-31-44 

Builders' Exchange Postwar Plans Vol.1 No. 24- 9-14-44 

Group to Advise on Financing Postwar Project 

Requested Vol.1 No. 26- 9-28-44 

Roll of Postwar Synthetics Suggested by 

3. F. Chamber Vol.1 No. 26- 9-28-44 

Planning Commission Completes Improvement 

Report for Postwar S. F Vol.1 No. 30-10-26-44 

Richmond Reconversion Vol.1 No. 30-10-30-44 

Chamber Managers to Attend Postwar Meet 

in Sacramento Vol.1 No. 31-11- 2-44 

Postwar Inn Sought Here Vol.1 No. 35-11-30-44 

PRODUCE TERMINAL 

New Produce Terminal Plans for San Francisco 

Revealed by Corporation Vol.1 No. 32-11- 9-44 

POSTWAR MARKETING 

Postwar Marketing Meeting Here to be 

Representative of Bay Area and West Vol.1 No. 21- 8-24-44 

Page 19 



INDEX 

BAY REGION BUSINESS 
1944 

PRESIDENT OF S. F. C. OF C. 

Falk Will Address Commercial Travelers' 

Annual Meeting Here Vol.1 No. 1- 4- 6-44 

Falk Extends Greetings to City's Baseball 

Club on Opening of '44 Season Vol.1 No. 4- 4-20-44 

Falk Honored Vol.1 No. 18- 8- 3-44 

West Portal Lions Club Lunch Vol.1 No. 26- 9-28-44 

Falk Talk at Oakdale Vol.1 No. 33-11-16-44 

Falk Asks Business to Postpone Mailings for 

Christmas Season Vol.1 No. 34-11-23-44 

Falk and Bay Area C. of C. Representatives 

Testify at Industry Hearing Here Vol.1 No. 34-11-23-44 

S. F. Chamber of C. Elects Officers-Henry Francis 

Frady, President Vol.1 No. 36-12- 7-44 

Yankee Trader .' Vol.1 No. 36-12- 7-44 

Falk Comments on 1944 "Bill of Rights" Observance, 

Dec. 10-15 Vol.1 No. 36-12-14-44 

San Jose Merchants Courtesy Suggestions Goven 

Wide Notice Vol.1 No. 37-12-14-44 

Chamber of Commerce Day at S. F. Ad Club 

to Honor Grady Vol.1 No. 39-12-28-44 

PRODDCTION 

Production Notes Vol.1 No. 2- 4-13-33 

Training Program Here Increases Production Vol.1 No. 9- 6- 1-44 

POBLIC AFFAIRS DEPARTMENT 

C. of C. to Expand Public Relations Program Vol.1 No. 36-12-14-44 

PDBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT 

Road Officials Tour Redwood Highways Vol.1 No. 11- 6-15-44 

RADIO 

New Postwar Program Added to Radio Series Vol.1 No. 1- 4- 6-44 

Open Dp Those Golden Gates! Theme of Radio Program Vol.1 No. 2- -4-13-44 

Chamber Radio Program Vol.1 No. 4- 4-20-44 

Weekly Radio Event Vol.1 No. 4- 4-27-44 

KQW Starts Air Series of Education Programs 

Keyed to Pacific Basin Vol.1 No. 4- 4-27-44 

Chamber Radio Series Requested by Stations 

Throughout the Nation Vol.1 No. 8- 5-25-44 

Radio KPO Vol.1 No. 14- 7- 6-44 

Radio Vol.1 No. 24- 9-14-44 

Radio - War of Enterprise Vol.1 No. 25- 9-21-44 

Radio - KSFO Vol.1 No. 26- 9-28-44 

Broadcasting System Makes Local Station 

West Coast Center Vol.1 No. 30-10-26-44 

Weekly Radio Series Started by NBC on 

Reconversion Effects Vol.1 No. 33-11-16-44 

Page 20 






. 



. 



INDEX 

BAY REGION EOSINESS 
1944 

RATES 

Protest Against Increase in Wharfage and Dockage Rates. .. .Vol.1 No. 2- 4-13-44 
Land Grant Fate Appeal Is Supported by San Francisco 

Chamber in Endorsement of H.R. 4184 Vol.1 No. 2- 4-15-44 

House Passes Chamber-Urged Repeal of 

Land Grant Rail Rates Vol.1 No. 9- 6- 1-44 

MAJOR REAMES 

Major Reames Appointed to Chamber Staff Vcl.l No. 10- 6- 8-44 

RECONSTROCTICN FINANCE CORPORATION 

Business Needing Funds to Reconvert, May Look 

To R.F.C., McCullough Says Vol.1 No. 8- 5-25-44 

RECONVERSIONS 

Bay Area Reconversions List Vol.1 No. 32-11- 9-44 

Bay Area Reconversions List Vol.1 No. 39-12-28-44 

RED WOOD EMPIRE ASSOCIATION 

Reiwooa Empire Election Vol.1 No. 16- 7-20-44 

Redwood Empire Association Holds Victory Meet 

Oct. 20-21 Volil No. 29-10-19-44 

REHABI LITATION 

Mare Island Hospital Rehabilitation Program Told Vol.1 No. 26- 9-28-44 

RENEGOTIATION 

Renegotiation Deadlines Set for Subject Firms' 

Report to Price Adjustment Board Vol.1 No. 5- 5-4-44 

RESEA RCH DEPARTMENT 

Yotir Chamber of Commerce RESEARCH DEPARTMENT Vol.1 No. 12- 6-22-44 

Classified Organization Lists Available at S.F. Chamber. . .Vol.1 No. 22- 8-31-44 
San Francisco Area Revealed as West's Most 

Compact Market Vol.1 No. 32-11- 9-44 

1944 Evaluation of San Francisco-Oakland Industrial Area., Vol.1 No. 35-11-30-44 

RESOURCES CGONCIL 

Resources C ouncil Will Aid Buyers in Canvass 

of Regional Market Vol.2 No. 2- 4-13-44 

RETAIL MERCHANTS ASSOCIATIO N 

Greater Dnity Noted Eetween District Groups 

San Francisco C. of C Vol.1 No. 7- 5-18-44 

Retail Merchants Group Elects Officers; 

Re-elects Lenehan Vol.1 No. 32-11- 9-44 

Merchants to Give Christmas Display Materials 

to Hospitals Vol.1 No. 35-11-30-44 

RICHMOND 

R ichmond Gets 150,000 for Industry Publicity Vol.1 No. 26- 9-28-44 

Page 21 



INDEX 

BAY REGION BUSINESS 
1^44 

RIGHT TO WORK 

Special Message to Our Members Vol.1 No. 4- 4-20-44 

'Right to Work' Message Opposed by 3 More Groups Vol.1 No. 6- £-11-44 

RODEO 

Livermore Rodeo Will Ee Held June 10 and 11 Vol.1 No. 10- 6- 8-44 

Sonoma Rodeo Set for Sunday June 25 Vol.1 No. 11- 6-15-44 

ROTARY GLOB 

Rotary General Sec'y Will Speak in San Francisco Vol.1 No. 59-12-28-44 

ALMON E. ROTH 

Almon E. Roth Will Speak at National Maritime Day Lunch. . .Vol.1 No. 6- 5-11-44 

RUSSIAN WAR RELIEF 

Presents for R ussian Children Sought in Drive 

By War Relief Vol.1 No. 34-11-23-44 

Send Warm Clothing to Russian Children Vol.1 No. 36-12- 14-44 

SALES MANAG ERS COUNCIL 

Sales Managers Council for Economic Development 

To Hold Conference Vol.1 No. 20- 8-17-44 

Five Talks, and Panel Discussion Scheduled 

As Conference C loses VI. 1 No. 21- 8-24-44 

SALVAGE 

Notice! Waste Paper Salvage Drive Vol.1 No. 18- 8- 3-44 

S an Franciscans' Cooperation on Paper Drive Urged Vol.1 No. 12- 8-10-44 

Contribute All Waste Paper to the Paper Salvage Campaign. .Vol.1 No. 20- 8-17-44 

SAN JCaQUIN COUNTY 

San Joaquin County Produces Record Crops Vol.1 No. 11- 6-15-44 

SAN JOAQUIN VALLEB ASS'N OF COMMERCIAL ORGANIZATION SECRETARIES 

SJVACOS Holds Regular Organization Meeting..". Vol.1 No. 11- 6-15-44 

SJVACOS Announces Progress on Cotton Production Survey. .. .Vol.1 No. 25- 9-21-44 

SAN MATEO 

Fiftieth Anniversary, San Mateo, Feted Vol.1 No. 22- 8-31-44 

SALT LAKE CITY 

Backman, Salt Lake City, Here Vol.1 No. 9- 6- 1-44 

Backman Urges West Cooperate for Post?<ar... Vol.1 No. 10- 6- 8-44 

SAN JOSE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 

San Jose Chamber of Commerce Salutes Women in War Effort. .Vol.1 No. 11- 6-15-44 

SANTA CL ARA COUNTY 

Santa Clara County Gains New Storage, Cannery Plants Vol.1 No. 1- 4- 6-44 

Santa Clara County Unites on Industry Promotional Plan. .. .Vol.1 No. 4- 4-27-44 

Experts to Survey Assets of Santa Clara County Vol.1 No. 7- 5-18-44 

Increased iianufacturing Ups ^anta Clara County Emp Vol.1 No. 8- 5-25-44 

Page 22 



INDEX 

BAY REGION BUSIHE SS 
1S44 

S ANTA CLAR A COUNTY, Cont'd. 

Fruit Shipments Gain in Santa Clara County Vol. 1 No. 15- 6-22-44 

SERVICES-CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 

Chamber of Commerce Praised by Local Man, 

More Should Use, He Says Vol. 1 No. 35-11-30-44 

SHIP BUILDING 

Bay Region Now Biggest in World Shipbuilding 

Says Government Study Vol. 1 No. 2- 4-13-44 

Shipbuiding Beneficial to Small West Firms 

According to Survey Vol. 1 No. 6- 5-11-44 

West Coast Shipyards Again Lead the Nation in 

November Ship Deliveries Vol. 1 No . 37-12-14-44 

SHIPPING 

Shipping Loss Claims Amendment Sponsored Vol. 1 No. 2- 4-13-44 

Berkeley Rates Second in Fast Freight Hauling Vol. 1 No. 4- 4-20-44 

Bay Region Improvement in Car Unloading Performance Vol. 1 No. 7- 5-16-44 

San Francisco Bay Port to Ee World's Largest 

Predicts W.S.A. official Vol. 1 No. 8- 5-25-44 

NFTC Bulletin Reports Shipping Mail Regulations 

For Shippers/. Vol. 1 No. 11- 6-15-44 

Port of San Francisco Will Be Nation's First 

Says General Kells Vol. 1 No. 12- 6-22-44 

Increased Demurrage Charges Order to Affect 

Local Shippers Vol. 1 No.29-lC-19-44 

Bay Area Leads Nation Again in Shipbuilding V ol.l No. 30-10-26-44 

Boxcar Shortage Still Acute Despite Month Change 

in Cargo Demurrage R ates Vol. 1 No. 31-11- 2-44 

October D eliveries of Ships Announced Vol. 1 No . 33-11-16-44 

Holiday Unloading Plan Vol. 1 No. 36-12-14-44 

Freight Handling Contract Desired by Lathrop Point Vol. 1 No. 37-12-14-44 

Campaign Heightens on Holiday Unloadings Vol. 1 No. 37-12-14-44 

SMALLER WAR PLANTS CORPORATION 

SWPC Advisory Aid Now Available Here Vol. 1 No. 4- 4-20-44 

Small Manufacturers Sought by U.S. Maritime Commission.. . .Vol. 1 No. 10- 6- 8-44 

Members Give Views on Small Business Policy Vol. 1 No. 24- 9-14-44 

SOMMER AND KAUFMANN 

Local F irm Erochure Is Effective Also for S.F Vol. 1 No. 37-12-14-44 

SOUTHERN PACIFIC RAILROAD 

•War Service Day' Held by Southern Pacific R.P.. 

To Honor Servicemen.... Voo. 1 No. 24- 6-22-44 

STATE JUNIOR CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 

Deas, Daniels of S.F. Named Officers of State 

Chamber of 8ommerce Vol. 1 No. 13- 6-22-44 

STOCKTON 

Navy Supply Depot to Be Built at Stockton Vol. 1 No. 18- 8- 3-44 

Page 23 



INDEX 

BAY REGION BUSINESS 
1944 

STOCKTON CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 

Stockton Record Production Figures Announced 

by Chamber of Commerce Vol.1 No. IE- 6-22-44 

Stockton Chamber of Commerce Membership Vol.1 No. 35-11-30-44 

DAVID P. STREET 

Street in Sacremento Vol.1 No. 10- 6- 8-44 

' Street and Stull Named to Advertiser's Group Vol.1 No. 16- 7-20-44 

SURPLUS PROPERTIES DISPOSAL 

Surplus Properties Disposal Policies Stated Vol.1 No. 4- 4-27-44 

Surplus War Properties — Tocl Price Policies Told 

by Chief Vol.1 No. 17- 7-27-44 

Treasury Department Reports Surplus Items Available Vol.1 No. 18- 8- 3-44 

Surplus Goods Available Vol.1 No. 23- 9- 7-44 

Four Point Recommendations Advocated for Disposal 

of Government Surplus Goods Vol.1 No. 24- 9-14-44 

Surplus Propoerties Disposal Vol.1 No. 28-10-12-44 

Safety Helmet Surplus Offered For Sale Here Vol.1 No. 31-11- 2-44 

Nation's Surplus Items Lists, to be Available 

at Local Offices, Here Vol.1 No. 32-11- 9-44 

Surplus Machine Tools Announced by Navy Yards Vol.1 No. 37-12-1 4-44 

SDRVEY OF BUSINESS ACTIVITY 

Monthly Survey of Business Activity Vol.1 No. 5- 5- 4-44 

Survey of Business Conditions in San Francisco Vol.1 No. 5- 5- 4-44 

Business Activity Edition— Thumb Nail Sketch Vol.1 No. 9- 6- 1-44 

Survey of Business Conditions in San Francisco Vol.1 No. 9- 6- 1-44 

1944 Economic Survey of San Francisco Booklet 

Available at Chamber Vol.1 No. 12- 6-22-44 

Business Activity Edition— Thumb Nail Sketch Vol.1 No. 14- 7- 6-44 

Survey of Business Conditions in San Francisco Vol.1 No. 14- 7- 6-44 

Business Activity Edition, Thumb Nail Sketch Vol.1 No. 18- 8- 3-44 

Survey of Business Conditions in San Francisco Vol.1 No. 18- 8- 3-44 

Business Activity Edition, Thumb Nail Sketch Vol.1 No. 23- 9- 7-44 

Survey of Business Conditions in San Francisco Vol.1 No. 23- 9- 7-44 

Business Activity Edition, Thumb Nail Sketch Vol.1 No. 27-10- 5-44 

Survey of Business Conditions in San Francisco .....Vol.1 No. 27-10- 5-44 

General Business Activity, Thumb Nail Sketch Vol.1 No. 31-11- 2-44 

Survey of Business Conditions in San Francisco....... Vol.1 No. 31 -11- 2-44 

General 3usiness Activity, Thumb Nail Sketch Vol.1 No. 36-12- 7-44 

Survey of Business Conditions in San Francisco Vol.1 No. 36-12- 7-44 

TAXES 

Tax Limitation Bpposed by Chamber Board of Directors Vol.1 No. 15- 7-13-44 

Chamber of Commerce States Federal Expenditures Policies. .Vol.1 No. 16- 7-20-44 

New Witholding Tax Forms Vol.1 No. 21- 8-24-44 

Chamber of Commerce Policy on Federal Spending Commended. .Vol.1 No. 25- 9-21-44 
S.F. Retail Group Suggestion Receives Nationawide Support. Vol.1 No. 28-10-12-44 

TH0MASC0L0R 

New Color Photographic Method Announced Vol.1 No. 13- 6-22-44 

Page 24 



INDEX 
BAY REGION BUSINESS 

1944 
TIDE WATER ASSOCIATED OIL COMPANY 

Tidewater Oil Announces Opening Tire Recapping 

Plant Here, Early June ". Vol.1 So. 7- 5-18-44 

TRAFFIC AND TRANSIT POLICIES 

Policy on Parking Announced by C. of C Vol.1 Mo. 28-10-12-44 

TRANSPORTATION 

Transportation Board Opposed Vol.1 No. 14- 7- 6-44 

Junior Chamber Streetcar Plan Vol.1 No. 19- 8-10-44 

Junior C. of C. Plan for Better Street 

Car Service Endorsed Vol.1 No. 24- 9-14-44 

Eight Traffic, Transit Recommendations 

Approved by C. of C Vol.1 No. 2*- 9-21-44 

Street System Policy Announced by C of C Vol.1 No. 26- 9-28-44 

S.F. Chamber Policy on Traffic Regulation 

Described in R eport Vol.1 No. 33-11-16-44 

TRAVEL 

Chamber Again Urges No Unnecessary Trips Vol.1 No. 7- 5-18-44 

IL 

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA EXTENSION COURSES 

Course in Plastics Starts in San Francisco Friday Vol.1 No. 24- 9-14-44 

University Starts Course in Quality Control Soon Vol.1 No. 50-10-26-44 



VACATION HERE CAMPAIGN 

Vacation Here is Theme for New Campaign 

to Reduce Travel '. Vol.1 No. 17- 7-27-44 

Bay Area Vacation Plans Announced by Travel 

Conservation Committee Vol.1 No. 18- 8- 3-44 

Bay Area Residents Urged to Vacation Here 

This Summer Vol.1 No. 21- 8-24-44 

Don't Travel Campaign Proves Successful, 

State Chamber Reveals Vol.1 No. 21- 8-24-44 

Oakland C. of C. Publishes Vacation Here Pamphlet Vol.1 No. 24- 9-14-44 

VETERANS 

Former Michigan Residents Sought Here by Veterans' Off ice. Vol.1 No. 35-11-30-44 

V-DAY 

Celebrate War's End in Europe by Greater Efforts 

for Final V-Day! — Falk Vol.1 No. 24- 9-14-44 

San Francisco Program for Victory Fleet Day Observance. .. .Vol.1 No. 25- 9-21-44 

V-E DAY 

V-E Day Citizens Committee Appointed Vol.1 No. 27-10- 5-44 

'On to Tokyo' S.F. Slogan, Spreads Throughout Nation Vol.1 No. 28-10-12-44 

VICTORY ADVERTISING COMMITTEE 

Victory Advertising Group Plays Important Role in War Vol.1 No. 28-10-12-44 

Page 25 



INDEX 

BAI REGION BUSINESS 
1944 



DEPARTMENT OF WAR 

Unified Command Plan Vol.1 No. 8- 5-25-44 

WAR BONDS 

Retailers Start 'Third Army' and Extensive Campaign 

for Fifth War Loan Drive H ere , Vol.1 No. 8- 5-25-44 

Union Square Kick-off Made for 5th War Loan Vol.1 No. 11- 6-15-44 

Fifth War Loan Drive Here Meets With Great Success Vol.1 No. 12- 6-22-44 

San Francisco Advertisers Urged to Support War Effort Vol.1 No. 13- 6-22-44 

Retailers' 5th War Loan Successes Discussed Vol.1 No. 15- 7-13-44 

Editorial-"E" Bonds Vol.1 No. 16- 7-20-44 

Chamber Staff 100% "E" Bond Purchasers Vol.1 No. 17- 7-27-44 

Back the Attack! Buy "E" Bonds Vol.1 No. 17- 7-27-44 

War Bond Generals from San Joaquin Entertained Here ..Vol.1 No. 17- 7-27-44 

Local Stores Awarded First and Fourth Prize for 

War Bond Display Vol.1 No. 22- 8-31-44 

Retailers 'Third Army' War Bond Sales Successes Told Vol.1 No. 22- 8-31-44 

Retailers Pre paration for 6th War Loan Drive Vol.1 No. 33-11-16-44 

Drive for Sixth War Loan Starts Vol.1 No. 34-11-23-44 

Retailers Asked to Give Added Boost to 6th War 

Loan Sales Vol.1 No. 37-12-14-44 

WAR CONTRACT PRICE ADJUSTMENT BOARD 

Changes in Renegotiation Law Interpretation Are 

Made by Contract Board Vol.1 No. 1- 4- 6-44 

Remove Restrictions on War Contracts Asked Vol.1 No. 7- 5-18-44 

WFA (WAR FOOD ADMINISTRATION) 

WFA Provides Help to Industries Through In-Plant 

Feeding Here Vol.1 No. 11- 6-15-44 

WAR LABOR BOARD 

'End Labor Stalemate' S.F. Chamber Wires 

President Roosevelt Vol.1 No. 15- 7-13-44 

WLB Announces Pay Policy for V-E Day Vol.1 No. 26- 9-28-44 

WAR MEMORIAL 

World War II Memorial Urged for San Francisco. 1 Vol.1 No. 21- 8-24-44 

WAR MOVIES 

Official War Movies Available to Plants 

For War Worker Shows Vol.1 No. 6- 5-11-44 

Official War Movies Here Vol.1 No. 7- 5-18-44 

WAR PRODUCTION BOARD 

Simplified Application Methods Reflected in Form WPB-1319. Vol.1 No. 6- 5-11-44 
Nelson Explains WPB Views on Entrance of New Firms 

in Industry Vol.1 No. 7- 5-18-44 

List of Shortages Available Bol.l No. 13- 6-29-44 

S.F. Businessmen Approve WPB's Green Light 

for Civilian Goods Prodiction Vol.1 No. 25- 9-21-44 

Platinum Needed for War, States WPB Vol.1 No. 28-10-12-44 

Small Business Want3 Freedom, S a y S Krug Vol.1 No. 30-10-26-44 

Page 26 



. 






. 



. 






INDEX 

BAY REGION BUSINESS 
1944 

WAR PROGRAM 

Navy Plans Expansion of Oakland Supply 

Depot in $25,100,000 Appropriation Vol.1 No. 1- 4- 6-44 

Pamphlet for Industry V-Gardens Available Vol.1 No. 12- 6-22-44 

Army Pre-Induction Training Bulletin Announced Vol.1 No. 17- 7-27-44 

U.S. War Expenditures— Daily Rate Vol.1 No. 17- 7-27-44 

Acquisition of City Hotels Under Study by 

War Department Vol.1 No. 19- 8-10-44 

WARTIME HARVEST COUNCIL 

Late Employee Vacations Urged by harvest Council Vol.1 No. 2- 4-13-44 

Harvest Council Will Gage Agencies Participation in '44... Vol.1 No. 4- 4-27-44 

Harvest Council Names New 1944 Committee.... Vol.1 No. 6- 5-11-44 

Youth Harvest Camps Established for City's High 

School Boys, Girls Vol.1 No. 10- 6- 8-44 

San Francisco Youth in Urgent Demand for 

Harvesting 1944 Crops Vol.1 No. 12- 6-22-44 

WASHINGTON OFFICE OF C. OF C. 

Washington Notes Vol.1 No. 1- 4- 6-44 

Marsh Wins Friends for Bay Region in Nation's 

Capital Chamber Bureau Vol.1 No. 2- 4-13-44 

Washington Notes Vol.1 No. 3- 4-20-44 

Washington Notes Vol.1 No. 5- 5- 4-44 

Washington Notes Vol.1 No. 6- 5-11-44 

Washington News Flash Vol.1 No. 6- 5-11-44 

Washington Notes Vol.1 No. 7- 5- 18-44 

Washington Notes Vol.1 No. 8- 5-25-44 

Lundborg To Look Over Washington, D.C. Office Vol.1 No. 8- 5-25-44 

Washington Notes Vol.1 No. 10- 6- 8-44 

Chamber Manager Returns from Washington Conference Vol.1 No. 10- 6- 8-44 

Washington Notes Vol.1 No. 11- 6-15-44 

Washington Office Found Highly Useful Vol.1 No. 11- 6-15-44 

Washington Notes Vol.1 No. 12- 6-22-44 

Washington Notes Vol.1 No. IS- 7-13-44 

Washington Notes Vol.1 No. 16- 7-20-44 

Marsh, Here in August Vol.1 No. 15- 7-13-44 

Washington Notes Vol.1 No. 17- 7-27-44 

Marsh to Report to Chamber Membership.... Vol.1 No. 18- 8- 3-44 

Today's Speaker, Frank E. Marsh Vol.1 No. 19- 8-10-44 

Western Chambers Unite To Tell Story Reports 

Marsh in Talk to '"embers Vol.1 No. 20- 9-14-44 

Washington Notes Vol.1 No. 24 9-14-44 

Wishington Notes Vol.1 No. 25- 9-21-44 

Washington Notes Vol.1 No. 26- 9-28-44 

Washington Notes Vol.1 No. 28-10-12-44 

Washington Notes Vol.1 No. 29-10-19-44 

Marsh Aids Berkeley Hospital in Getting Priorities 

from WPB Vol.1 No. 29-10-19-44 

Washington Notes Vol .1 No . 30-10-26-44 

Washington Notes Vol.1 No. 32-11- 9-44 

Washington Notes Vol.1 No. 34-11-23-44 

Washington Notes Vol.1 No. 35-11-30-44 

Page 27 



INDEX 

BAY REGION BUSINESS 
1944 

WASHINGTON OFFICE OF C. OF C. 

Washington Office, Clearing House for 

Farm Representatives Vol.1 No. 35-11-30-44 

Washington Office Vol.1 No. 36-12-7- 44 

Washington Notes Vol.1 No. 37-12-14-44 

Washington Notes Vol . 1 No . 38-12-21-44 

S.F. 'Unofficial Representatives' Vol.1 No. 38-12-21-44 

Washington Notes Vol.1 No. 39-12-28-44 

WESTERN INSTITUTE OF COMMERCIAL AND TRADE ASS'N 
Bay Region C. of C. Officials Attending 

Western Institute Vol.1 No. 13- 6-22-44 

More Bay Area Directors of Western Institute Announced. .. .Vol.1 No. 15- 7-13-44 

WESTERN STATES COUNCIL 

Western S tates Council Formed by C. of C's Vol.1 No. 33-11-16-44 

WINTER FOOD GARDENS 

Needed— Fall and Winter Food Gardens Vol.1 No. 19- 8-10-44 

WORLD TRADE CENTER 

Corporation Organized for- World Trade Center Vol.1 No. 1- 4- 6-44 

California Chambers Endorse S.F. World Trade Center Plan.. Vol.1 No. 32-11- 9-44 

NEIGHBORS' WORK EXCHANGE 



Work E xchange Praised Vol.1 No. IE- 7-13-44 

WORK PI LE 

Women's Work Pile Vol.1 No. 1- 4- 6-44 

Women Join Work Pile Plot with Special Group Studies Vol.1 No. 2- 4-13-44 

State Project C ommittee to Further Work Pile 

Plan Urged by Col. Heron Vcl.l No. 4- 4-27-44 

Women's Work Pile Dinner Meeting Set for Tuesday, July 18. Vol.1 No. IE- 7-13-44 

Regional Survey of Work Pile Results? Now Underway Vol.1 No. 20- 8-17-44 

yeomen's Work Pile in San Francisco Now Totals $842, 728 Vol.1 No. 39-12-28-44 

Kelly Named Chairman of New Work Pile Committee Vol.1 No. 26- 9-28-44 

Oakland Work Pile Now Totals $25,000,000 Vol.1 No. 27-10- 5-44 

Oakland Work Pile Totals Pass $EO,000,000 Mark Vol.1 No. 30-1 0-26-44 

Oakland Work Pile Totals $147 Million According 

to C-hamber of Commerce Vol.1 No. 34-11-23-44 

S.F. Work Pile Over $126 Million Vol.1 No. 37-12-21-44 

The Work Pile Vol.1 No. 4- 4-27-44 

(Bay Region Work Totals Mount San Jose Completes; 

Oakland Reports) 



Page 28 




W W PUBLISHED BY THE 



Volume I 



W PUBLISHED BY 1 

SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 

Thursday, April 6, 1944 



Number 1 



WASHINGTON NOTES 



OfficialWashingtonisbecoming 
acutely aware of the tremendous 
contribution the San Francisco 
Bay Area is making to the war 
effort. With increasing emphasis 
on the war in the Pacific it is an- 
ticipated that greater considera- 
tion will be given to the problems 
that now confront the Region. 

It is recognized in Washington that 
the production of vast amounts of 
war materiel in the San Francisco 
Bay Area creates a situation which 
can have very far reaching conse- 
quences. It must be the concern of 
every business man and of organized 
labor, as well as of government. 

• Reconversion is one of the most 
important subjects under discussion 
in Washington today. Many plans 
have been discussed ; apparently none 
have been accepted. All plans have 
been based on the premise that, re- 
gardless of civilian production, the 
war needs must come first. 

• Emergency Price Control Act 

extension seems assured. It appears 
the unanimous opinion that a number 
of amendments will be approved by 
Congress before final action is taken. 

• Contract Termination methods 
are under discussion by the Special 
Committee on Post War Economic 
Policy and Planning of the Senate. 

The various branches of the War 
Department are doing considerable 
planning on instruction programs in 
contract termination for contractors 
and suppliers. The Ordnance Depart- 
ment has already held some courses in 
the East. The Quartermaster Depart- 
ment expects to have plans ready in 
the near future. Both of these 
branches have given their approval 
to the proposed plan of the San Fran- 
cisco Chamber of Commerce for simi- 
lar instruction in the San Francisco 
Bay Area. 

—From the Chamber's Washington OJfice. 



Weekly Bulletin to Promote Goals 
Of All Bay Region Communities 



Albert M. Dunfee Joins 
Industrial Department 
As G. L. Fox Assistant 

Reflecting the announced plans to 
intensify the San Francisco Chamber's 
activities in the industrial develop- 
ment field, Albert M. Dunfee has been 
appointed Assistant Manager of the 
Chamber's Industrial Department by 
Louis B. Lundborg, General Manager. 

Dunfee comes to the Chamber 
from the San Francisco Regional 
Office of the National Housing 
Agency, having resided in the Bay 
Area for many years. 

• Stanford Man — He graduated 
from Stanford University as a Civil 
Engineer in 1927 and later did post- 
graduate work at the Stanford School 
of Business Administration. 

He has had a broad background of 
engineering and construction experi- 
ence in the Bay Area and will handle 
various technical phases of the Cham- 
ber's Industrial Department work. 

"I am sure that this addition to 
the Chamber departmental staff 
will help materially to round out 
our ability to do a constructive job 
in the important field of industrial 
development," Lundborg said. 



New Postwar Program 
Added to Radio Series 

• New Series — Beginning April 9, 
a series of 13 programs entitled OPEN 
UP THOSE GOLDEN GATES! will 
be presented over KJBS from 7:30 to 
7 :45 every Sunday evening. 

This series, sponsored by the Cham- 
ber and KJBS, will feature plans and 
progress to date on the "Roadmap" 
to tomorrow. 



A news-packed, condensed 
weekly report on matters of im- 
portance to Bay Region business, 
industry, and agriculture — 

That is the idea behind this first 
issue of Bay Region Business, a new 
weekly publication of the San Fran- 
cisco Chamber of Commerce. 

• Economic Unit — The job of this 
news publication is to provide mem- 
bers and other friends of the San 
Francisco Chamber of Commerce 
with facts and ideas useful in the 
general development of the San Fran- 
cisco Bay Region as one economic 
unit. 

Contributions have been invited 
from other Bay Region chambers 
of commerce, and it is hoped this 
bulletin may become a vital in- 
strument in the promotion of Bay 
Region Unity. 

• United Action — Unity and co- 
operative action by Bay Region 
chambers of commerce is already an 
accomplished fact in many fields of 
activity. Some of these fields are in- 
dustry, naval affairs, maritime affairs, 
air transport planning, postwar plan- 
ning, and regional public relations. 

In one field after another the 
trend is growing toward cooper- 
ative action by the sixty united 
communities of the San Francisco 
Bay Region. 

• Advantages — Taken together, 
these sixty communities command a 
wealth of resources and natural ad- 
vantages far surpassing any compa- 
rable region on the whole Pacific 
Coast. 

To exploit these advantages to the 
fullest for the prosperity and progress 
of the whole region is a number one 
point in the policy and program of 
the San Francisco Chamber. 

It is the assignment of this new 

weekly publication to aid in every 

possible way in capitalizing upon 

these regional advantages. This as- 

(Continued on Page Two) 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Thursday, April 6, 1944 



Falk Will Address 
Commercial Travelers' 
Annual Meeting Here 

"The Salesman's Position in 
the Postwar" will be discussed by 
Chamber President Adrien J. Falk 
at a dinner meeting of the United 
Commercial Travelers of America, 
Golden Gate Council No. 80 on 
Tuesday, April 18, 6 p.m. at the 
Bellevue Hotel. 

The purpose of this meeting is to 
develop a consciousness on the part 
of the United Commercial Travelers 
membership of the important part 
which salesmen will play in postwar 
activities. 

• Honor Guests — Presidents of the 
San Francisco Sales Managers Asso- 
ciation and the Food Industries Sales 
Managers Club are being invited as 
guests of honor. Distinguished guests 
from the grand council of the United 
Commercial Travelers of America 
will be in attendance, and members 
of this city's Sales Managers Associa- 
tion and Food Industries Sales Man- 
agers Club are also being invited. 

The United Commercial Travelers 
of America is an organization com- 
posed of 75,000 traveling and pro- 
fessional men. 



Weekly Bulletin- 

(Continued from Page One) 
signment will be carried out through 
news, reports, messages and back- 
ground data designed to strengthen 
the program of regional unity and 
cooperation. 

• Publications — Previous publica- 
tions have focussed upon San Fran- 
cisco. First it was San Francisco 
Business. Then San Francisco Today. 
Then San Francisco Today and To- 
morrow. 

Now it is not only San Francisco 
today and tomorrow that engages 
our attention but the Bay Region 
and its unlimited potentialities in 
the postwar world. 

• War and Postwar — Winning the 
war is our first assignment. Work to 
guarantee a free and prosperous place 
for fighting men when they return 
from war is an equally important task. 
Both jobs demand unity, and unity 
upon specific points. 

• Help Needed — Bay Region Busi- 
ness, then, is planned as a means of 
achieving these ends. It will need your 
loyal help and support. 



Chamber Opposes River Water 
Provisions of Treaty With Mexico 



Changes In Renegotiation 
Law Interpretation Are 
Made By Contract Board 

Based upon the 1943 Revenue Act, 
the War Contract Price Adjustment 
Board has issued an interpretation 
whereby, (a) Appreciation in excess 
inventory value no longer is thought 
of as an item of renegotiable profits, 
and (b) When such appreciation pre- 
viously has been recovered by the 
government, the contractor is eligible 
for a refund no matter what period 
the renegotiation covered. 

Claim must be filed with the 
Secretary of the Department con- 
cerned (War, Navy, etc.) before 
May 25, 1944. Initially, only a 
letter is needed, but approval is 
dependent upon full information. 



New Federal Directory 
Shows Huge Increase In 
Governmental Bureaus 

The latest revised edition of the 
Directory of Federal Offices in San 
Francisco and the Bay Area is now 
being distributed. 

#311 Offices — Compiled by the Do- 
mestic Trade Department of the San 
Francisco Chamber, the Directory 
contains information concerning 311 
Federal Agency offices in the Bay 
Area. Of these, 169 are regional hav- 
ing jurisdiction over territories vary- 
ing from 2 to 1 1 states. So-called War 
Agencies account for 69 of the total 
number of offices, and 90 are offices of 
the armed forces — Army, Navy, Coast 
Guard and Marines. 

Widely used by Western busi- 
nessmen, chambers of commerce 
and trade associations, the Direc- 
tory has become the "bible" as 
well for officials of the agencies 
listed, by assisting them in main- 
taining contact between them- 
selves. 

The Directory is detailed to show 
a description of each agency's func- 
tion, area of jurisdiction, location, 
and names and titles of key officials. 
• Copies Available — Copies of the 
revised Federal Directory may b« 
obtained by calling Carroll Snyker, 
EXbrook 4511, Extension 42. 



The San Francisco Chamber has 
registered opposition to the provisions 
of a proposed treaty between this 
country and Mexico whereby Mexico 
would receive 1,500,000 acre-feet of 
water annually from the Colorado 
River. 

• Proposed Treaty — The proposed 
treaty, prepared by the State Depart- 
ment, is now before the Senate Foreign 
Relations Committee. 

The Chamber's opposition to 
the treaty is based on a detailed 
report submitted by the Agricul- 
tural Committee under John E. 
Pickett's chairmanship. 

• Act Violated — According to the 
report, extension of the benefits of 
Boulder Dam storage to Mexico 
would flatly violate the principles of 
the Boulder Canyon Act, Section 1, 
which provides that waters conserved 
by the dam shall be used for "bene- 
ficial use exclusively within the United 
States." 

By the terms of the treaty, Mexico 
is practically guaranteed for all time 
1,500,000 acre-feet of Colorado River 
water, which precludes any possibility 
for broad expansion of the use of these 
waters in the United States. 

• Mexican Favors — Under terms of 
the treaty .domestic water users' rights 
are junior to Mexico's. In cycles of 
dry years should a shortage develop, 
Mexico would still receive her stipu- 
lated amount of water while states 
and communities which paid for and 
built Boulder Dam would suffer severe 
shortages. 

According to the Agricultural 
Committee report, Mexico is to 
receive the water free of charge. 
In addition to this, to meet Mex- 
ico's monthly needs our govern- 
ment will have to construct, at 
its own cost, the Davis Dam, and 
will have to construct or acquire 
all other works needed to deliver 
this water to Mexico. 

• Water Deficit — It is estimated 
that in dry cycles of from seven to 
eleven years, there could be a deficit 
of 2,062,000 acre-feet of water avail- 
able for use from this reservoir, taking 
into account commitments made by 
the government with California, Ari- 
zona, and Nevada plus the proposed 
Mexican Treaty. This deficit would be 
borne by those agencies benefiting 
from the project in the three states. 
Mexico, under the terms of the treaty, 
would continue to get its full quota. 



Thursday, April 6, 1944 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



New Domestic Trade Program Adopted 



Navy Plans Expansion of 
Oakland Supply Depot In 
$25,100,000 Appropriation 

A program of $25,100,000 expan- 
sion by the Navy in the Oakland 
metropolitan area was announced 
this week by the Oakland Cham- 
ber of Commerce upon advice 
from Congressman Albert E. Car- 
ter in Washington. 

Other Bay Region allotments in- 
clude $6,830,000 for an ordnance 
bureau magazine at Port Chicago in 
Contra Costa County, $1,500,000 for 
fleet and cargo piers in San Francisco, 
and $1,000,000 for expansion at Mills 
Field. 

• Huge Expansion — Included in the 
Oakland area program are allotments 
of $9,000,000 for the Naval Air Sta- 
tion, Alameda; $4,000,000 for cargo 
assembly pier and Oakland naval 
supply depot; $2,100,000 for six tem- 
porary warehouses in Oakland; 
$1,000,000 for offshore material re- 
ception center in the Oakland area; 
and $4,000,000 for the aviation supply 
annex. 

Census of Bay Region Labor 
Force Will Be Taken Soon 

Preparations are now under way 
to make a survey of the present Bay 
Region labor force. 

• Survey Conference — The 
Regional Labor Force Survey Con- 
ference, which is undertaking this 
project, will hold its next meeting 
Monday, April 10, at 12 P.M. at the 
Hotel Leamington in Oakland. 

Representatives of this region's 
chambers of commerce, organized labor 
leaders, and shipyard executives are 
being invited. 

• Shipyards — The possibility of con- 
fining the first survey to Bay Region 
shipyards whose willingness to co- 
operate has been indicated will be 
discussed by the Conference. Under 
this plan, similar surveys would be 
made subsequently in other indus- 
tries, such as the utilities and retail 
trade fields. 

Authorization of a pilot survey 
in one of the shipyards will be 
requested, and a recommenda- 
tion that a prominent expert be 
employed to handle the setting 
up and supervision of the surveys 
will be made. 



Welcome to Dr. Henry F.Grady 
Is Scheduled for Near Future 

A welcome home luncheon to honor 
Dr. Henry F. Grady who has just 
returned from a government mission 
in Italy is scheduled for the near 
future. 

• Lunch Cancelled — The luncheon 
had been originally planned for Mon- 
day, April 3, but had to be cancelled 
because of Dr. Grady's illness. 

In Italy, Dr. Grady served as 
Deputy Vice President of the 
Allied Control Commission. He is 
president of the American Presi- 
dent Lines and a vice president 
and director of the San Francisco 
Chamber of Commerce. 



Corporation Organized 
For World Trade Center 

Following up the approval by 
the Chamber Board of Directors 
of the World Trade Center project 
in principle, the Board of Trus- 
tees and officers of World Trade 
Center, Inc., have been named to 
investigate the practicability and 
prepare plans for possible execu- 
tion of the project. 

World Trade Center, Inc. is a non- 
profit corporation, which will include 
in its plans financial estimates of 
potential income and costs of the 
project. 

• Officers — Officers and members of 
the Board of Trustees for the cor- 
poration are: President, Leland W. 
Cutler, Fidelity & Deposit Co.; Vice 
President, O. C. Hansen, Frazer & 
Hansen; Treasurer, Leland M. Kai- 
ser, Kaiser & Co.; A. H. Jacobs, 
Jacobs, Malcolm and Burt; Hon. 
Edward H. Tickle, banker, State 
Senator, and chairman, State Central 
Republican Committee; Ira S. Lillick, 
Lillick, Geary, Olson & Charles; Ray 
B. Wiser, California Farm Bureau 
Federation; Harry S. Scott, General 
S. S. Corp., Ltd.; Frank K. Runyan, 
Western Merchandise Mart; Wm. G. 
Merchant, Downtown Association; 
B. Frank Modglin, Builders of the 
West and MacDonald & Kahn, Inc.; 
Ernest Ingold, Ernest Ingold Co.; 
Harvey Hancock, United Airlines; 
M. J. McCarthy, San Francisco 
Foreign Freight Forwarders, Inc. ; A. 
McKie Donnan, Brisacher, Van Nor- 
den & Staff. 



A three-point work program for 
1944 has been adopted by the 
Chamber's Domestic Trade Com- 
mittee. 

• Point one on this program will 
be a market analysis, which will be 
made to study character of the mar- 
ket in San Francisco's primary trade 
area and to determine deficiencies in 
present manufacturing facilities. 

• Point two will consist of buying 
power studies to determine the per 
capita increase in income in the pri- 
mary trade area together with popu- 
lation increases to determine size and 
scope of the postwar market. 

• Point three is entitled Consumer 
Goods Resources Exploitation Pro- 
gram. Its broad objectives are to 
exploit fully sources for consumer 
goods in San Francisco, Central and 
Northern California and to strengthen 
smaller producers and wholesalers to 
the point where their lines will add to 
our market structure. 

"An opportunity exists today," 
said Lloyd E. Graybiel, chairman, 
Domestic Trade Subcommittee 
on Postwar Planning, "to firmly 
establish San Francisco as an 
important Pacific Coast market 
center. Buyers today are hungrily 
seeking merchandise supply 
sources who never before recog- 
nized the importance of the San 
Francisco market. By persuading 
them to inspect this market now, 
habits will be formed which will 
carry over into the postwar pe- 
riod." 

To attract buyers to the San Fran- 
cisco market and assist them in their 
inspection, the Domestic Trade com- 
mittee plans to compile and keep an 
up-to-date, comprehensive index of 
all consumer goods resources in Cen- 
tral and Northern California. This 
will be kept in the form of a classified 
directory. 

• Directory — This directory with 
personal invitations to inspect the 
San Francisco market will be sent to 
merchandise managers of every de- 
partment store in the nation, and this 
will be followed up from time to time 
with letters containing timely infor- 
mation on developments in the San 
Francisco market. 



Women's "Work Pile" 

The famous San Francisco Chamber 
of Commerce "Work Pile" plan will 
now reach the households of San 
Francisco through the city's Women's 
Round Table. 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Thursday, April 6, 1944 



DOMESTICTRADET.PS 



A digest of correspondence received 
from those desiring, or offering, lines 
of merchandise for representation. 
They are listed here as a service with- 
out necessarily bearing endorsement 
by the Chamber. For further details, 
contact the Domestic Trade Depart- 
ment, EXbrook 4511, Ext. 74. 

D-5989— F. L. SCHMEHR, 2820 West 
View Street, Los Angeles, 16, California, is 
looking for lines of merchandise for distribu- 
tion on the West Coast. 

D-5990— CARLOS WHEATON, 3042 Irv- 
ing Avenue, South, Minneapolis, Minnesota, 
is interested in distributing in that locality 
for electrical concerns or other general equip- 
ment manufacturers. 

D-5991 — A Southern California margarine 
manufacturer is interested in securing a 
jobber to handle their product locally. Name 
available from Domestic Trade Department, 
EX 4511, Ext. 74. 

D-5992— A. H. TONG YOUNG, 1947 
South Beretania Street, Honolulu, T. H., 
wishes to represent local gift ware manufac- 
turers in the Hawaiian Islands. 

D-5993— MR. J. I. DEMICK, VICTOR 
CORY COMPANY, 100 Hudson Street, 
New York City, wishes to represent Western 
Food Products company in the East. 

D-5994— ALPHA RUBBER PRODUCTS 
COMPANY, 727 Atlantic Avenue, Boston, 
Mass., interested in salesman covering the 
Coast to sell line of leather tobacco pouches 
and ration token holders. 

D-5995— AMERICAN MACHINE 
PRODUCTS COMPANY, Marshalltown, 
Iowa, wishes to be represented in this City. 
Has a line of furnace and air conditioning 
equipment. 



Santa Clara County Gains New 
Storage, Cannery Plants 

Notice of two important plant ex- 
pansions has been sent to the San 
Francisco Chamber by F. B. Keip, 
secretary of the Santa Clara Chamber 
of Commerce. 

• Warehouse — One large Santa 
Clara County industry, Security 
Warehouse and Cold Storage Com- 
pany, is about to start on a $100,000 
addition and improvement to its plant. 
This expansion will add greatly to the 
volume of frosted foods being pro- 
cessed in Santa Clara, according to 
Keip. 

• Cannery — Pratt-Low Preserving 
Company, one of the nation's largest 
canneries, is also making improve- 
ments and alterations to the amount 
of approximately $125,000, Keip said. 

"Both of these plants are located 
in the city of Santa Clara and 
have coast-wise and national 
prominence," Keip remarked. 



Midwest Meat Packers 
Seek Lower Rail Rates 

The San Francisco Chamber of 
Commerce, acting jointly with the 
Oakland and Los Angeles Chambers 
of Commerce, has filed with the Inter- 
state Commerce Commission a strong 
protest against the request of certain 
midwest meat packers for lower rail 
rates to Pacific Coast and inter-moun- 
tain territory markets. 

• Threatens Industry — Walter A. 
Rohde, San Francisco Chamber of 
Commerce Transportation Depart- 
ment Manager, said the three cham- 
bers of commerce take the position 
that the rate reductions sought by 
certain Iowa, Minnesota, and Corn 
Belt packers would, if granted by the 
ICC, practically ruin the meat packing 
and livestock industries of the Pacific 
Coast. 



New Plant Located In 
Emeryville by G. M. 

Pacific Coast Headquarters of the 
Electro Motive division of General 
Motors Corporation have been estab- 
lished in Emeryville, according to 
announcement from the Oakland 
Chamber of Commerce. 

• Emeryville Plant — The division 
is establishing an industrial plant for 
servicing the huge seventy ton Diesel 
electric locomotives such as are used 
by the Southern Pacific and Santa Fe 
lines. The plant will be located on the 
Southwest Corner, Stanford Avenue 
and Doyle Street in Emeryville. Con- 
struction is to begin June 1. 



Good Neighbor Visit to 
Alameda Made by S. F. 
Chamber Committee 

Carrying forward the program of a 
friendly interchange of visits between 
San Francisco and the productive 
communities of the Bay Area, North- 
ern and Central California, a Domes- 
tic Trade Committee group yesterday 
visited Alameda. 

• Falk, Lapham Speak — The visit 
was highlighted by a dinner given in 
the San Francisco group's honor by 
the Alameda Lions' Club. Principal 
speakers at the dinner were Mayor 
Roger D. Lapham and Chamber 
President Adrien J. Falk. 

As guests of the Alameda Cham- 
ber of Commerce, the group, 
which consisted of 13 members of 
the Domestic Trade Committee 
of the Chamber, was taken on a 
conducted tour of the United 
States Maritime Service Officers' 
School — one of two such schools 
in the nation. They were con- 
ducted on this tour by Com- 
mander M. E. Crossman, U. S. 
N. R., superintendent of the 
school. 

• Future Trips — Two events are 
scheduled for the near future accord- 
ing to the Trade Area Relations Sub- 
committee. On April 5, a delegation 
from Stockton will be guests of San 
Francisco's Domestic Trade Com- 
mittee here, and on May 17, a San 
Francisco group will visit Contra 
Costa County. 



The San Francisco Chamber of Commerce 

333 Pine St., San Francisco 4 
EXbrook 4511 



Sec. 562, P. L. & R. 
U.S. POSTAGE 

San FranciscoTt-SrfTj 
Permit No. 1880 




r f PUBLISHED BY THE 



Volume I 



PUBLISHED BY THE 

SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 

Thursday, April 13, 1944 



Number 2 



PRODUCTION NOTES 



• Aircraft Production in March 
set an all-time monthly record, both 
in terms of numbers and weight of 
airplanes produced. A total of 9,118 
planes of all types rolled off the as- 
sembly lines last month, continuing 
the remarkable over-schedule achieve- 
ment of the aircraft industry during 
the past several months. In terms of 
airframe weight, production exceeded 
for the first time the 100,000,000 
pound mark, increasing by more than 
nine percent over February, the pre- 
vious high, to attain a total estimated 
at 103,400,000 pounds. 

• The value of machine tool ship- 
ments continued to decline in Feb- 
ruary, according to a preliminary 
report. Shipments during the month 
totaled $50,150,000, a decrease of 11 
percent from shipments in January. 

• Salvage Drives Spurred — Na- 
tional, State, and regional WPB sal- 
vage chiefs met in San Francisco last 
week to map plans for speeding waste- 
paper and other waste materials col- 
lections in homes, offices, and war 
plants of the western states. The 
parley was called by Eric Marks, 
Chief of the WPB General Salvage 
Branch, from Washington, with WPB 
salvage officials from California, Ari- 
zona, Nevada and Idaho attending. 

• Appointments — George M. Bet- 
terton of San Francisco was appointed 
Manager of Transportation Equip- 
ment Division for the War Production 
Board in Washington, D. C. Better- 
ton is on leave of absence from his 
post as general purchasing agent for 
the Southern Pacific Company. 

Arthur J. Grier, of Oakland, has 
been appointed District Manager of 
the Production Service Division in 
San Francisco. 

— From the WPB Regional Office 



Don't forget the Personal 

Income Tax Estimate 

Deadline, April 15 



Chamber Named Nation's First 
To Urge Reciprocal Foreign Trade 



New Chamber Bulletin 
Meets With Approval 
Throughout Bay Region 

Bay Region Business has been well 
received throughout the San Fran- 
cisco Bay Area. 

• "The first issue is well conceived, 
well-written, well laid-out," said John 
Cuddy, Californians Inc. 

• "The publication, Bay Region 
Business, is excellent," wrote Fred D. 
Parr, Parr-Richmond Terminal Corp., 
' ' First, because of its name and second , 
because it really covers the Bay Area 
without segregating the various sec- 
tions in such a way as to make them 
appear as separate units." 

• "I will recommend such weekly 
bulletin, and believe it will fit in very 
nicely with your efforts to create Bay 
Area Unity," said Julius Jorgensen, 
secretary-manager, Pittsburg Cham- 
ber of Commerce. 

• "I think it is a splendid publica- 
tion and I shall be happy to be kept 
on your mailing list," wrote Fred C. 
Tatton, manager, Central Coast Dis- 
trict, California State Chamber. 

• "We shall be pleased ... to sub- 
mit copy for your paper," said Dolph 
Young, secretary Petaluma Chamber. 



Rally Held by Napa Chamber 
To Launch Postwar Program 

The Napa Chamber of Commerce 
held a rally, Wednesday evening, 
April 12, at the Plaza Hotel in that 
city to mobilize Chamber members 
and all interested citizens for work on 
Napa's postwar program. 
• Napa's theme is "An American 
Community Has the Courage to Sub- 
mit Itself to Public Analysis." 



The'San Francisco Chamber was 
congratulated for taking the leader- 
ship in emphasizing the need for two 
way foreign trade, by Franklin John- 
ston, publisher, American Exporter, 
New York, speaking at a Foreign 
Trade luncheon, April 10, Fairmont 
Hotel. 

• The Chamber's leadership was 

shown not only by its being the first 
Chamber of Commerce in the nation 
to propose reciprocal trade agree- 
ments, but in the emphasis laid on 
two way trade in the proposed World 
Trade Center for San Francisco, 
Franklin said. 

"Extension of the Hull Trade 
Agreement Program will come up 
for renewal next year , " said Frank- 
lin, "and it is none too early for 
foreign traders to urge upon Con- 
gress and the general public the 
importance of maintaining two 
way foreign trade." 

• U. S. exports could be increased 
by nearly nine billion dollars a year, 
according to Franklin, if we could 
import as much per capita as Great 
Britain. 



Late Employee Vacations 
Urged by Harvest Council 

Letters have gone out from Edson 
Abel, chairman, San Francisco War- 
time Harvest Council, to Chamber 
members and other employers re- 
questing that vacation schedules for 
employees be arranged to stress the 
months of August, September, and 
October. 

• These months constitute the 
period of greatest crop harvesting 
activity in this area and all employers 
or personnel managers are urged to 
encourage employees to plan vaca- 
tions for this time so they can join the 
Wartime Harvest Volunteers. 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Thursday, April 13, 1944 



Protest Against Increases In 
Wharfage and Dockage Rates 



The San Francisco Chamber of 
Commerce has placed before the Board 
of State Harbor Commissioners a for- 
mal protest against the increases in 
wharfage and dockage rates which 
have been published by the Board to 
become effective April 16. 

• It is the Chamber's position that 
the Board is not in need of the addi- 
tional revenues which would be pro- 
duced by the increases, and that the 
increases will cause unnecessary loss 
to shippers and shipowners and even- 
tually bring about reduction in the 
volume of traffic moving through the 
Port of San Francisco. 

The Chamber, therefore, re- 
quested the Board to issue a sup- 
plement voiding the protested 
increases. 

• The Manager of the Chamber's 
Transportation Department, Walter 
A. Rohde, was also authorized to 
take action, in cooperation with other 
protesting parties, against any similar 
increases in wharfage and dockage 
charges at any other California port. 



New Produce Market Studies 
Made by Enlarged Committee 

A program for immediate action to 
improve present produce market fa- 
cilities or build a new market in a 
more convenient location has been 
approved by the board of directors of 
the San Francisco Chamber. 

In an Agricultural Committee 
recommendation to the Board, 
John E. Pickett, chairman, 
pointed out that sufficient time 
has elapsed since completion of 
the produce market study to 
enable all interested parties to 
analyze and report on the survey. 

• Expanded Committee — To carry 
out the project effectively, the Pro- 
duce Market sub-committee of the 
Agricultural Committee has expanded 
to include representatives of as many 
interested groups as possible. 

The expanded committee has 
formed special study committees to 

(1) investigate possible property sites, 

(2) to study alternate types of organ- 
izations to build and operate such a 
facility and to investigate types of 
public control measures which might 
be considered advisable to prevent 
high rental charges, and (3) to plan 
publicity and promotion for the 
project. 



Resources Council Will 
Aid Buyers In Canvass 
of Regional Markets 

A new service to buyers from all 
parts of the country who visit San 
Francisco is now available in the re- 
cently established Resources Council. 

The Council was formed by Miss 
Dorothy Newman, in cooperation 
with the Manufacturers and 
Wholesalers Association and the 
San Francisco Chamber. 

• Council Function — The prime 
function of the Resources Council is 
to put visiting buyers in touch with 
the Apparel and Dry Goods market 
of Northern California as a whole. 

According to C. P. Tanner, man- 
ager of the Chamber's Domestic Trade 
Department, more and more large 
Eastern buyers are coming to San 
Francisco to ferret out resources. 
Buyers, unfamiliar with the San 
Francisco market, have a difficult 
time locating the exact type of mer- 
chandise they are seeking. This serv- 
ice, said Tanner, has been set up to 
expedite finding of these items or 
"resources" as they are known in the 
trade. 

The Chamber is cooperating 
with the Resources Council in 
development of supplementary 
information on manufacturers 
and sources of supply throughout 
the Central and Northern Cali- 
fornia area. 



Price Ceiling Protest 
Deadline Is Extended 

The Chamber's Washington office 
calls members' attention to Amend- 
ment No. 6 of OPA's Revised Pro- 
cedural Regulation No. 1. Under the 
Amendment, a protest against a 
maximum price regulation, based on 
grounds arising after the regulation is 
issued, may be filed at any time after 
such new grounds arise. Previously, 
there was a 60-day time limitation 
in filing such protests. 

Protests not based on grounds 
arising after issuance still must be 
filed within 60 days of the regula- 
tion's issuance. 



Ching Urges Agreements 
Without Government Aid 

Emphatic advice to employers to 
think "in terms of sound labor rela- 
tionships" was presented by Cyrus S. 
Ching, public relations director for 
U. S. Rubber Co. last Thursday at 
a San Francisco Chamber of Com- 
merce and Commercial Club luncheon. 

Ching pointed out that the prob- 
lem of the postwar period will be 
"conversion of raw materials into 
finished goods at a price and qual- 
ity that people will buy. That is 
the way to create employment." 

• Solution of this problem will be 
possible, Ching believes, only if 
management and labor can get 
together and come to terms without 
interference by government. 

"We've got to stop running to 
Washington for answers to our 
problems," Ching said. "And that 
applies to labor as well as manage- 
ment." 

• Ching struck out against "class 
legislation" whether discriminatory 
against management or labor as a 
danger to our political system. He 
expressed the opinion that public 
sentiment will turn against any group 
that misuses its power. 



Women Join // WorkPile #/ Plan 
With Special Group Studies 

• Huge Work Pile— The "Work 
Pile" at present holds $66,733,600 
worth of leads to new business in 
business houses and plants through- 
out the city. 

Through the cooperation of the 
women's organizations in the 
Round Table, a "Work Pile" sur- 
vey is now under way of needs 
among the homemakers of San 
Francisco. 

Information about exterior and 
interior remodeling and repair work 
will be collected by the women's 
group, and a survey of what house- 
hold equipment and furnishings the 
housewives of San Francisco intend 
to buy immediately after the war 
will be made. 

• Women's Work — The data 
obtained from this women's "Work 
Pile" survey as well as information 
on the work which has already been 
reported from business firms in the 
city will be made available by the 
Chamber to those interested. 

It is expected that these leads 
will start every trade and craft 
in the city off to work the day the 
war ends. 



Thursday, April 13, 1944 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Bay Region Now Biggest 
In World Shipbuilding 
Says Government Study 

The San Francisco Bay Region 
is the world's largest shipbuilding 
center. 

That is the fact brought out by the 
War Production Board's Summary of 
War Supply and Facility contracts 
according to analysis made by the 
San Francisco Chamber of Commerce. 

• Huge Total— Between June, 1940, 
and January of this year, contracts 
totalling 53,031,107,000 have been 
awarded to shipbuilding firms in the 
San Francisco Bay Region. 

San Francisco and Bay Region 
firms, the chamber reports, have re- 
ceived the highest total of facility 
contracts for any similar region in the 
West. The contracts total 8636,303,- 
000. Of this amount, 8349,989,000 
was for industrial facilities and 8286,- 
314,000 for military facilities. 

• Foodstuffs Additional— The 

grand total of all contracts awarded 
in this region has skyrocketed to the 
staggering total of $4,258,135,000. 
The War Production Board, the 
chamber pointed out, did not include 
contracts for foodstuffs and food 
processing which have aggregated 
tens of millions of dollars locally. 

The San Francisco Bay Region 
is the armed services' focal point 
for canned goods procurement. 



Continued Operation of Aluminum Plant 

at Riverbank To Be Sought By Chamber 



Land Grant Rate Repeal Is 
Supported by S. F. Chamber 
In Endorsement of H.R. 4184 

• Reiterating the stand it took two 
years ago, the San Francisco Chamber 
of Commerce, through Walter A. 
Rohde, manager of its Transportation 
Department, has gone on record with 
the House Committee on Interstate 
and Foreign Commerce, the Senate 
Interstate Commerce Committee and 
the entire Congressional delegations 
from the eleven western states, in 
support of H. R. 4184, to repeal all 
land grant rates. 

It is the Chamber's position 
that the railroads have already 
paid the Government, in the form 
of reduced rates and fares, several 
times the value of lands granted 
in the period from 1850 to 1870. 

• The Chamber holds the land 
grant rates to be discriminatory, pro- 
ductive of confusion and litigation, 
and prejudicial against contractors or 
bidders who are so located that the 
Government cannot obtain land grant 
rates from their plants. 

Computation of the land grant 
rates and fares is also held to be 
an overcomplicated process. 



"Open Up Those Golden Gates!" 
Is Theme of Radio Programs 



In answer to many requests, the 
full schedule of broadcasts remaining 
in the series of radio programs on 
postwar planning, "Open Up Those 
Golden Gates," heard Sunday even- 
ings at 7:30 over KJBS (1100 on 
your dial), is given below. 

• Another series of broadcasts spon- 
sored by the Chamber is "The War 
of Enterprise," heard over KSFO (560 
on your dial) Tuesdays at 12:45. 

PROGRAM SCHEDULE 

April 16 — San Francisco's "Work 
Pile" for Jobs After War 

April 23 — San Francisco — The 
Headquarters City 

April 30 — Industry Marches 
West — Will the San Francisco Bay 
Area Lead? 



May 7 — The Marts of Domestic 
Trade 

May 14 — San Francisco Bay — 
the Gateway for Pacific Trade 

May 21 — City and Country Look 
Ahead Together 

May 28 — For San Francisco — a 
Streamlined Produce Market and 
World Trade Center 

June 4 — Transportation — A 
Great City Reaches Out 

June 11 — World Commerce on 
San Francisco's Airlanes of the 
Future 

June 18 — What Kind of a House 
Will We Live In? 

June 25 — San Francisco's Serv- 
ice for the West in Washington, 
D.C. 

July 2 — Where Does the "Road- 
map"Lead? 



• Continued operation of an alu- 
minum plant at Riverbank, Stanislaus 
County, will be sought by the San 
Francisco Chamber of Commerce 
Mining Committee and Industrial 
Departments, following authorization 
by the Chamber's Board of Directors, 
it is announced by George B. Dodge, 
chairman, Mining Committee. 

• The Riverbank aluminum plant 
represents a Defense Plant Corpora- 
tion investment of $14,000,000 since 
the war. Operated by the Aluminum 
Company of America, the plant pro- 
duces aluminum from alumina sup- 
plied to it from Tennessee, where it is 
concentrated from South American 
bauxite. Power for the plant is sup- 
plied from the Hetch Hetchy system 
of the city of San Francisco. 

"According to reports received 
by the Mining Committee, there 
is a possibility that the Riverbank 
plant is scheduled for closing at 
an early date," Dodge said. "Clos- 
ing of the plant would eliminate 
an important factor in the econ- 
omy of the northern part of the 
State and cut off a market for 
Hetch Hetchy system power." 

• On recommendation from the 
Mining Committee, the Board has 
signified that the San Francisco 
Chamber will lend its support to 
efforts for continued operation of the 
plant through the war period. 

Studies will be made to determine 
the economic possibility of the plant's 
operation on a permanent basis, it is 
understood. 



Shipping Loss Claims 
Amendment Sponsored 

Congressman Richard J. Welch has 
advised Adrien J. Falk, president, 
San Francisco Chamber of Com- 
merce, that he will urge passage of an 
amendment to H. R. 3257, to provide 
a waiver of the one year limit in pre- 
senting claims for losses of ocean- 
going shipments. 

• Waiver Clause — Because of strict 
observance by the War Shipping Ad- 
ministration of the present one year 
period in which to report loss or 
damage, the Chamber, to protect 
shippers who might not learn or be 
able to report loss or damage within 
the period prescribed by law, has 
urged passage of a waiver clause. 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Thursday, April 13, 1944 



DOMESTICTRADETIPS 



A digest of correspondence received 
from those desiring, or offering, lines 
of merchandise for representation. 
They are listed here as a service with- 
out necessarily bearing endorsement 
by the Chamber. For further details, 
contact the Domestic Trade Depart- 
ment, EXbrook 4511, Ext. 74. 

D-5996— ARAD, 45 Pearson Street, Long 
Island City, New York, manufacturers of 
nonrationed playshoes, are interested in 
representation in California and adjoining 
states. 

D-5997— EARL G. DEAN, P. O. Box 326, 
Dumas, Texas, start in his locality an agency 
for all types of ready-to-wear. Interested rep- 
resenting San Francisco lines. 

D-599&— MR. WYNNE G. CANNON, 
P. 0. Box 446, St. Louis, 3, Missouri, wishes 
to secure San Francisco lines for representa- 
tion in that area. 

D-5999— CONN B. WILLIAMS, 157 Se- 
curity Building, Portland, 4, Oregon, inter- 
ested in adding to his lines art and gift wares, 
cosmetics and allied lines, also women's wear 
accessories. 

D-6000— HAROLD G. RICHARDS, 6144 
North Port Washington Road, Milwaukee, 9, 
Wisconsin, wishes to represent local manu- 
facturers in Wisconsin with headquarters out 
of Milwaukee. 

D-6001— J. D. PERSSON, Bank of Amer- 
ica Building, San Diego, 1, California wishes 
to represent manufacturer or jobber in the 
Pacific Southwest. 



Course On Plastics Offered By 
California Extension Division 

Fundamental knowledge of plastics 
and plastic materials which promise 
to be so important in the postwar 
world will be afforded by the Univer- 
sity of California Extension Division, 
540 Powell Street. 

• The course on plastics was 
launched Friday, April 7, and will be 
continued every Friday evening for 
several weeks at 7:30 P.M. 

Additional enrollments will be 
taken next Friday evening, April 
14, for the course consisting of two 
units of eight lectures each and 
listed as Elementary Plastics 803 
in the Engineering Section of the 
Extension Division Schedule. 

• For further information, call 
the Chamber's Industrial Depart- 
ment. 



Published weekly at 333 Pine St., San 
Francisco, Zone 4, County of San 
Francisco, California. Will Williams, 
Editor. Telephone EXbrook 4511. Sub- 
scription, Fifty Cents a Year (Included 
in Annual Dues). 



Chamber Annual Report 
Complimented Back East 

The Chamber's 1943 Annual Re- 
port is arousing favorable comment 
from chambers of commerce through- 
out the country. 

• One letter was received recently 
by General Manager Louis B. Lund- 
borg from L. W. Newcomer, secretary, 
Lancaster Chamber of Commerce, 
Pennsylvania, complimenting him on 
the make-up and effectiveness of the 
report. 

"I was favorably impressed with 
the large size type and the amount 
of white space in the make-up," 
Newcomer wrote. "You have made 
it brief so that members will read 
it, but at the same time, you have 
put over the thought that the or- 
ganization has been very active." 

• NACOS News also singled out the 
Report for mention in a recent issue. 



Pan American Celebration 
Held In Eureka April 3 

The Pan American Day Banquet 
held at Eureka, April 3, turned away 
200 people, according to William L. 
Montgomery, Chamber World Trade 
manager. 

• Guest of Honor at the banquet 
was Honorable Annibal de Saboia 
Lima, Consul General of Brazil in San 
Francisco. 

Montgomery spoke to the group 
gathered for observance of Pan 
American Day on "Brazil and 
United States Relations." 

He also participated in a radio 
broadcast over Station KIEM. 



Marsh Wins Friends For 
Bay Region In Nation's 
Capital Chamber Bureau 

"The Chamber's Washington 
Office under the management of 
Frank E. Marsh has already proved 
its value in the first month of its 
operation," according to Louis B. 
Lundborg, general manager of the 
Chamber. 

• Accomplishments chalked up so 
far include assistance on negotiations 
for the Armed Services Show held in 
San Francisco, March 19, 20, 21, and 
in Oakland, March 24, 25, 26— a 
great wartime event for the Bay 
Area. 

The office is serving in Washington 
as a San Francisco Bay Area informa- 
tion bureau. Eastern manufacturers 
are using the office to investigate pos- 
sibilities for Western plant locations. 

"Returning San Franciscans 
have commented on the efficient 
working organization which 
Marsh has set up," Lundborg 
said, "and all in all every activity 
of the Chamber has profited by 
having the Washington service 
available." 

At the opening of the office in 
Washington, March 3, Marsh told 
chamber of commerce representatives 
from many important western cities 
that through the office "great assist- 
ance could be provided in the handling 
of western wartime problems and in 
meeting postwar readjustment diffi- 
culties." 

Assistants to Marsh are Henri- 
etta Morris and Mary Efroymson. 



The San Francisco Chamber of Commerce 

333 Pine St., San Francisco 4 
EXbrook 4511 



Sec. 562, I 


>.L.*R. 


U.S. PQ 


€$** 


lc£ 


\H)> 


San^-afil 


*J, Calif. 


£y* 


Jo. 1880 




V J PUBLISHED BY THE 



Volume 



PUBLISHED BY THE 

SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 
Thursday, April 20, 1944 



Number 3 



WASHINGTON NOTES 



• Bay Region Unity is absolutely 
necessary for the protection of in- 
dustry, labor and agriculture. This 
unity must not be based upon the 
theory of asking for favors but must 
be for the purpose of protecting all of 
those things that make the Bay Area 
great. 

• Every effort is being made by the 
San Francisco Chamber of Commerce 
to present the true state of affairs in 
the Bay Area to those in Washington 
responsible for the conduct of the 
production program. 

• Private against Public Housing 
continues to be a major item among 
Congressional committees. Congress 
appears to be receptive to plans 
which are being proposed for private 
interests to provide additional hous- 
ing as it is required. 

• Civilian Production — Many- 
plans for a return to civilian produc- 
tion are being discussed in Washing- 
ton. One proposal recently submitted 
provides that, as critical materials 
are released, they shall be allocated 
to the various states, the percentage 
of allocation to be based on some 
two- or three-year average. This 
submitted as one means of assuring 
proper distribution. 

• The Foreign Economic Adminis- 
tration is receiving numerous in- 
quiries from exporters on the licensing 
of textiles and foods. Both are under 
allocation by the War Production 
Board. The amount of both available 
for export is determined after mili- 
tary, civilian and foreign needs have 
been pre-determined by the WPB. 
Applications from most countries are 
usually in excess of the total alloca- 
tion. Licenses that can be granted 
are apportioned to meet the more 
essential needs of particular markets. 

Recently certain licenses have 
been granted. Many exporters did 
not understand why all applica- 
tions for licenses were not granted . 
It has been pointed out that the 
world-wide shortage of textiles 

(Continued on Page Four) 



Folk Extends Greetings 
toCity'sBaseballClubon 
Opening of '44 Season 

Chamber President Adrien J. Falk 
sends greetings to Charles H. Graham, 
president, San Francisco Ball Club, 
Inc. on the opening of the Baseball 
Season. 

"Baseball is one of the most 
popular of all American sports," 
said Falk, "and we are proud of 
our Club here in San Francisco. 

"In spite of the opening game 
disappointment, I'm confident 
the Seals will come back with 
typical San Francisco punch, and 
make a fine showing during the 
1944 season." 



Grady Speaks to Chamber 
On European Devastation 

A general review of the work of the 
Allied Control Commission in Italy 
was given members of the Foreign 
Trade Association of the San Fran- 
cisco Chamber of Commerce and 
other Chamber members by Dr. 
Henry F. Grady, President, American 
President Lines, at a "Welcome 
Home" luncheon in his honor. 

As Dr. Grady explained, the 
work of the Commission is ad- 
visory to governments in liberated 
territories in the matter of effect- 
ing economic rehabilitation. 

It studies and advises on the work 
of reconstruction after preliminary 
cleaning up and restoration of order 
has been accomplished by AMG 
(Allied Military Government) which 
moves in with the troops and is a part 
of the army control. 

According to Dr. Grady, the de- 
struction wrought by retreating 
Germans is so wanton that the 
word vandalism in our vocabulary 
should be replaced by the word 
"germanism." 

Dr. Grady said that AMG and the 
Allied Control Commission has done 
an outstanding job of restoring order 
to German-devastated areas. 



SPECIAL MESSAGE 
TO OUR MEMBERS 

An initiative proposal des- 
ignated "Right to Work" is 
being circulated in California 
for signatures sufficient to 
qualify it for submission to 
the voters at the generel elec- 
tion next November. 

You may be asked to help 
further that petition. 

Ordinarily we do not make 
recommendations in matters 
affecting labor relations, 
leaving that to groups organ- 
ized for that purpose. 

But in our opinion, this 
initiative proposal tran- 
scends normal labor relations 
and involves national secur- 
ity at this time of war. 

In our opinion, this issue 
will cause dissention between 
industry and labor at a time 
when it is vital to unite for 
the undeviating prosecution 
of the war and the mainten- 
ance of essential production. 
Therefore, your Board of Di- 
rectors unanimously opposes 
this initiative measure. 
—Signed, 
Adrien J. Falk, President 
San Francisco 
Chamber of Commerce 



CANCACS Officers Attend 
Valley Meeting at Fresno 

Leslie J . Freeman and C. P. Tanner, 
president and secretary-treasurer, re- 
spectively, of CANCACS (Central and 
Northern California Association of 
Commercial Secretaries) will attend 
the meeting of the San Joaquin Valley 
Association of Commercial Organiza- 
tion Secretaries being held in Fresno, 
Friday, April 21. 

Freeman and Tanner will par- 
ticipate in discussions relative to 
formation of plans for future de- 
velopment of San Joaquin Valley 
resources and will offer full co- 
operation of CANCACS. 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Thursday, April 20, 1944 



Ingold Outlines "Work Pile" 
at Portland Rotary Luncheon 

Ernest Ingold, Past President, San 
Francisco Chamber of Commerce, 
spoke in Portland on the San Fran- 
cisco "Work Pile" plan, as guest of 
the Portland Rotary Club, Tuesday, 
April 11. 

Ingold, in speaking in Portland, 
assisted in carrying forward Ro- 
tary International's Number One 
objective of promoting the "Work 
Pile" plan in all communities 
where local clubs exist. 

• As 1943 President of the Cham- 
ber, Ingold was instrumental in cre- 
ating the plan. 

Berkeley Rates Second 
in Fast Freight Handling 

Berkeley showed the next to lowest 
percentage of freight cars detained 
over the allowed forty-eight hours in 
the six major freight terminals of 
four Western States, according to a 
report from the Berkeley Chamber of 
Commerce. 

• Berkeley rates sixth in volume of 
freight cars handled out of ninety- 
two cities in California, Nevada, Ari- 
zona, and New Mexico. The other 
five cities are Los Angeles, San Fran- 
cisco, Long Beach, Oakland, and 
Richmond. 

News of Berkeley's favorable show- 
ing was contained in a report from 
the Association of American Rail- 
roads for the period ending March 31. 

"Efficient use of freight cars is 
of vast importance in the war 
effort," said J. D. Sarber, general 
manager, Berkeley Chamber. 

"Success of such a program de- 
pends upon the willing coopera- 
tion of shippers and receivers of 
freight." 

Major Chamber Luncheon 
To Be Held Thursday, May 4 

• Luncheon honoring "Three Fa- 
vorite Sons of San Francisco Bay 
Region" has been set for Thursday, 
May 4, in the Commercial Club. 

Turn to opposite side of the 
page for announcement of lunch- 
eon and reservation slip. 
MAKE RESERVATIONS EARLY! 



Published weekly at 333 Pine St., San 
Francisco, Zone 4, County of San 
Francisco, California. Will Williams, 
Editor. Telephone EXbrook 4511. Sub- 
scription, Fifty Cents a Year (Included 
in Annual Dues). 



Stockton Group In San Francisco 
Guests of Chamber Committee 



Washington Notes 

(Continued from Page One) 

and foods necessitates the reduc- 
tion in certain areas which have 
in the past been supplied in large 
volume in the United States in 
order to supply areas where needs 
are greater. 

The Foreign Economic Adminis- 
tration is well aware of the difficulties 
inherent in the present procedure but 
is making every effort to cooperate 
with the Washington Office of the 
San Francisco Chamber of Com- 
merce and Bay Area Exporters. 

• Draft Deferment is still one of 
the "hot" issues. Although the Army 
has made an announcement that its 
quota of 7,700,000 men has been 
reached, Selective Service will con- 
tinue to induct at the rate of about 
150,000 a month for replacements. 

Selective Service Local Boards 
have been advised to follow the 
provisions of the so-called 
"Tydings Amendment." If this is 
done, the production of vital foods 
will be safeguarded in greater 
measure. 



Chamber Radio Program 

• "OPEN UP THOSE GOLDEN 
GATES!" heard every Sunday eve- 
ning at 7:30 p.m. over KJBS will 
feature San Francisco as the Head- 
quarters City this coming Sunday, 
April 23. 



A delegation of 12 Stockton busi- 
nessmen and Chamber of Commerce 
representatives visited San Francisco, 
Friday, April 14, as guests of the 
San Francisco Chamber's Domestic 
Trade Committee. 

• A luncheon for the group was 
held at the Bohemian Club, followed 
by a brief business meeting. 

In the afternoon the Stockton 
delegation inspected the United 
States Naval Drydocks at Hunters 
Point, through arrangements 
made by Captain N. L. Rawlings, 
Officer in charge and manager of 
the Drydocks. 

The group was then taken to the 
roof of the Merchants Exchange 
Building for a view of the proposed 
World Trade Center Site. 



Paper Company Builds 
Storehouse and Offices 
On Emeryville Plant Site 

Building of a new combination 
paper storage unit and sales promo- 
tion offices has just been started by 
Pacific Manifolding Book Company 
at Green and Powell Streets, Emery- 
ville. 

President P. D. Richardson and 
General Manager Harold D. Weber 
of the Oakland Chamber of Com- 
merce participated in the brick- 
laying ceremony for the new 
structure, Friday, April 14. 
• The new unit will cost $60,000, 
and has been established with the 
assistance of the Oakland Chamber 
Industrial Department. 



The San Francisco Chamber of Commerce 

333 Pins St.. Son Francisco 4 
EXbrook 43 11 



jgec. 562, P. L. & R. 
Aj/fejTOSTAGE 
^ifcJA^ID 

SanVi»#ciscc!fcCalif. 
Permrske. 1&0 




^W Beaton SWtoi 



^ ^ PUBLISHED BY Tl 



PUBLISHED BY THE 

SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 



Volume I 



Thursday, April 27, 1944 



Number 4 



Central California Groups 
Demonstrate United Front 
on Industry Developments 

Recent actions by public and other 
agencies throughout Central Cali- 
fornia urging continued operation of 
the Riverbank Aluminum Plant dem- 
onstrate the community of interest in 
industrial development in Northern 
California, according to the Cham- 
ber's Industrial Department. 
• Action Taken. When reports 
were circulated recently to the effect 
that the Riverbank Plant was sched- 
uled for early closing, chambers of 
commerce, boards of supervisors, city 
councils, irrigation districts' directors, 
unions and other agencies took formal 
actions to assure continued operation 
of the plant which was established by 
the Defense Plant Corporation of the 
Federal Government and is oper- 
ated by the Aluminum Company of 
America. 

The diversified agencies which 
have been active in the matter in- 
clude: Alameda County Board of 
Supervisors, Livermore Chamber 
of Commerce, Modesto City Coun- 
cil, Modesto Irrigation District, 
Modesto Chamber of Commerce, 
First National Bank of Oakdale, 
Oakdale District Chamber of 
Commerce, Stanislaus County 
Board of Supervisors, Tracy Dis- 
trict Chamber of Commerce, Tur- 
lock Irrigation District, Public 
Utilities Commission of San Fran- 
cisco, San Francisco Chamber of 
Commerce, Riverbank Chamber 
of Commerce, Electrical Workers 
Union, Cannery Workers Union 
Local 22382 of Modesto, Central 
Democratic Committee, San Joa- 
quin County Board of Super- 
visors. 

• The Riverbank project uses 
power developed by the Hetch-Hetchy 
System of San Francisco, thereby not 
consuming a vital natural resource 
such as oil and coal; is located in an 
area where labor is available; pro- 
duces metal of high quality; and 
operates at costs comparable with 
those prevailing elsewhere. 



Western Airlines Institutes New 
Non-stop Service from S.F. to LA* 



MAY 4 LUNCHEON IS 
"UNIQUE," SAYS FALK 

The coming May 4th luncheon 
is "unique" according to Cham- 
ber President Adrien J. Falk. 

"We are in the unique po- 
sition here in the San Fran- 
cisco Bay Area of having 
three Bay Region men as 
presidents or heads of three 
national and international 
organizations," said Falk. 

"The luncheon scheduled 
for May 4 will honor our 
three 'favorite sons', War- 
ren H. Atherton, National 
Commander, the American 
Legion ; Donald B. Rice, presi- 
dent, Kiwanis International; 
and Charles L. Wheeler, 
president, Rotary Interna- 
tional. 

"The San Francisco Ki- 
wanis Club singers will also 
appear on the luncheon pro- 
gram." 



Cof C Committeemen Named 
by Governor to State Board 

Members of the Chamber's Mining 
Committee have welcomed announce- 
ment of the appointment of three of 
its members to the State Mining 
Board of five by Governor Warren. 

They are: Phil R. Bradley, Jr., 
president, Pacific Mining Com- 
pany and president, Mother Lode 
Mining Association; W. W. Mein, 
Jr., vice president, Calaveras Ce- 
ment Company; F. C. van Deinse, 
president, Yuba Manufacturing 
Company and vice president and 
general manager, Yuba-Consoli- 
dated Gold Fields. 



Western Airlines, one of the pioneer 
air routes of the country, will insti- 
tute a non-stop service between San 
Francisco and Los Angeles, Monday, 
May 1. 

President Adrien J. Falk, other 
Chamber officials, and city offi- 
cials will be on hand to see the 
first Western Airlines plane de- 
parture on this new service, Mon- 
day, 10:00 A.M. 

• Daily departures from the San 
Francisco Airport for this new non- 
stop air service to Los Angeles are 
10:00 A.M., 4:20 P.M., and 10:30 
P.M. Flying time is two hours. 

G. Roy Backman has been ap- 
pointed District Traffic Manager 
here. Western Airlines district office 
is at 291 Geary Street, San Francisco. 



California Industry Meet 
Set for Tuesday, May 9th, 
to Feature Reconversion 

"Producing for Victory and Pre- 
paring for Peace" is the theme for the 
Northern California Industrial Con- 
ference at the Palace Hotel, May 9. 

The meeting is sponsored by the 
National Association of Manu- 
facturers and the San Francisco 
Chamber of Commerce in coop- 
eration with other leading North- 
ern California employers' asso- 
ciations. 

• Frederick C. Crawford, presi- 
dent, Thompson Products, Inc., re- 
cently termed "the most dynamic 
representative of management in the 
United States" will be among the 
featured speakers at the luncheon. 

The afternoon session will fea- 
ture a "Transition Period" panel. 

• Robert M. Gaylord, president, 
N.A.M., will be principal speaker for 
a dinner closing the day's activities. 

For reservations call or write 
to N.A.M., 1267 Russ Building, 
DOuglas 0664. 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Thursday, April 27, 1944 



Chamber Recommends 
7-Point Plan for 
OPA Price Controls 

Recommendations for changes 
in the Emergency Price Control 
Act designed to insure a clearer 
understanding of the Act, and to 
produce "better price control, 
rather than less price control" are 
contained in a resolution adopted 
by the Board of Directors of the 
San Francisco Chamber of Com- 
merce. 

"The Chamber is greatly inter- 
ested in price control retention so 
long as materials shortages and 
high purchasing power prevail," 
said Chamber president Adrien J. 
Falk. 

The resolution covers six major 
recommendations. In brief they are 
as follows: 

1. That the OPA should not exer- 
cise the duties of regular law en- 
forcement agencies and courts. 

2. That an Industry Council be 
established within OPA, acting as ad- 
visor to the Administrator and par- 
ticipating in the drafting of regula- 
tions. 

3. That a Board of Appeals be 
established within OPA to review 
complaints on the practical effects of 
regulations and ceilings. 

4. That price regulations be the 
functions solely of OPA. 

5. That a joint Congressional In- 
vestigating Committee be established 
for discretionary review of OPA's 
administrative actions. 

6. That the Act for the present be 
extended for one year only — thus 
providing another opportunity for 
re-appraisal. 

• These recommendations which 
have been forwarded to members of 
Congress were developed after study 
by a committee composed of: Vincent 
Kennedy, California Chain Stores 
Association, chairman; T. A. Leddy, 
Zellerbach Paper Company, Fred 
Pruter, Pacific Coast Garment Manu- 
facturers Association; John Nivens, 
Purity Stores, Ltd.; Charles J. Kelly, 
Getz Bros. ; Herbert Gray, Barron- 
Gray Packing Company; V. V. Kerns, 
Di Giorgio Fruit Corporation. 

Call EXbrook 4511, local 73, for 
copies of the resolution. 

Harvest Council Will Gage 
Agencies Participation in '44 

A meeting of the San Francisco 
Wartime Harvest Council will be 
held Wednesday, April 26. 



Chamber Approves Seven-Point 
Postwar International Policy 



California Plants Awarded 
by Maritime Commission 

Frank E. Marsh, Manager of the 
Chamber's Washington Office, has 
sent a list of plants and shipyards 
having been awarded the "M" Award 
by the Maritime Commission be- 
tween April, 1942 and December, 
1943. 

A total of 17 California plants 
received the award, and of these 
nine are located in the Bay Area. 
• Bay Area plants receiving the 
award were: Joshua Hendy Iron 
Works; Richmond Shipyard Number 
One (Permanente Metals Corpora- 
tion) ; Permanente Metals Corpora- 
tion, Richmond Shipyard Number 
Two; Production Engineering Com- 
pany; W. A. Bechtel Company (Ma- 
rinship); Columbia Steel Company; 
Western Pipe & Steel Company of 
California; Moore Dry Dock Com- 
pany; Dohrmann Hotel Supply Com- 
pany. 

China -American Council 
Head Urges Preparation 
For Postwar China Trade 

Julean Arnold, chairman, China- 
American Council, has submitted the 
following report on opportunities and 
importance of trade with China. 

"This is a psychological mo- 
ment for the San Francisco Bay 
Area to go to bat and prepare for 
postwar trade with China. 

"Fortunately, China- American 
Council of Commerce and In- 
dustry paves the way. 

"Already a San Francisco Bay 
Area Committee has been set up 
to take advantage of ways and 
means for an efficient organized 
effort. 

"This committee is composed 
of 21 outstanding business and 
industry leaders of the Bay Area. 

"The Council is working in close 
cooperation with the Departments 
of State and Commerce in Wash- 
ington, D.C., and also with the 
Chinese Government, and plans 
soon to open an office in Chung- 
king. 

"Already steps are underway 
for setting up in China a similar 
council, composed of leading Chi- 
nese business men and industrial- 
ists." 



The Board of Directors of the San 
Francisco Chamber of Commerce has 
approved the United States Chamber 
Referendum No. 78 on measures to 
promote postwar international law 
and order. 

• The Referendum consists of 7 
declarations of policy, proposed by 
the U. S. Chamber's Committee on 
International Postwar Problems and 
approved by the national Chamber 
Board. 

In approving Referendum No. 
78, the San Francisco Chamber 
has placed itself on record favor- 
ing the U. S. Chamber recommen- 
dations on the following mat- 
ters: 

• Prompt consideration of ques- 
tions the solution of which may be 
accomplished or definitely planned 
before the cessation of hostilities. 

• Exercise of interim powers by 
the United States and other United 
Nations. 

• Immediate establishment of an 
International Commission to prepare 
a plan for the structure of a general 
international organization. 

• Establishment of instrumentali- 
ties for the pacific settlement of in- 
ternational disputes by means of 
conciliation and conference. 

United States membership in the 
Permanent Court of International 
Justice. 

• Maintenance of the Permanent 
Court of Arbitration. 

• Further development of inter- 
national law and creation of a perma- 
nent international law institute. 

For further information on the 
Chamber approved policies, call 
EXbrook 4511, Extension 52. 



Santa Clara County Unites 
on IndustryPromotion Plan 

The San Jose Chamber of Com- 
merce held a dinner meeting recently 
for the various chambers of com- 
merce of Santa Clara County. 

According to Vinton H. Mat- 
thews, president, San Jose Cham- 
ber, and chairman at the meeting, 
the dinner marked the first in a 
series of Roundtable Sessions to 
promote teamwork in develop- 
ment of Santa Clara County re- 
sources. 

• Emphasized particularly was the 
industrial promotion campaign now 
underway. 



Thursday, April 27, 1944 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Surplus Properties Disposal Policies Stated 



State Project Committee 
to Further "Work Pile" 
Plan Urged by CoLHeron 

The San Francisco "Work Pile" 
plan is progressing throughout the 
state of California as a practical prep- 
aration for the reconversion period 
after the war. 

• Colonel Alexander R. Heron, 
director, State Reconstruction and 
Reemployment Commission, in a 
speech delivered at a joint meeting of 
his commission with the State Cit- 
izens' Advisory Committee, said : 

"In one phase of preparation 
for the transition period, the San 
Francisco 'Work Pile' program 
has attained national recognition. 
In some form, it is being used by 
many cities both in California and 
elsewhere. It represents one of the 
first activities for which material, 
men and money will be available. 

"If there is any way in which a 
project committee sponsored by 
this commission can contribute to 
the further adoption and clinch- 
ing of the 'Work Pile' program, 
that is a desirable duty for us to 
undertake. This may be a proper 
activity for a project committee 
sponsored by your Committee on 
Redevelopment of Trade and 
Service Establishments, working 
closely with the local Committee 
of the San Francisco Chamber of 
Commerce and with other com- 
munities which should use this 
plan." 



South San Francisco Up 
72 Percent in Population 

The city of South San Francisco 
now has a total population of 11,406, 
according to a special census com- 
pleted March 1, 1944 by the Bureau 
of Census, Department of Commerce. 

This figure represents an increase 
of 4,777, or 72.1% over April 1, 1940. 



DON'T FORGET TO 
VOTE 



Bay Area Dominates in 
March Ship Deliveries 

Dominance of San Francisco Bay 
Area shipbuilding industry is demon- 
strated by an analysis of reports just 
received from the U. S. Maritime 
Commission by the Chamber's In- 
dustrial Department concerning ves- 
sel deliveries during the month of 
March. 

Of 152 vessels delivered by all 
yards in the United States, 40 ves- 
sels, or 26%, were delivered by 
yards in the San Francisco Bay 
Area. 

• A total of 70, or 46%, were de- 
livered by yards on the Pacific Coast 
as compared with a total of 47 de- 
liveries on the Atlantic Coast; 34, 
Gulf Coast; and 1, Great Lakes. 

Of the 40 vessels delivered by 
Bay Area yards, 23 were Liberties 
from Richmond ; 4, C2 cargo ships 
from Moore Dry Dock Company at 
Oakland; 4 tankers from Marin- 
ship Corp. at Sausalito; 8 vessels 
of special types, 6 from Richmond 
and 2 from Sausalito; 1 concrete 
barge from San Francisco. 



Foreign Trade Tips Called 
"Dollars and Cents 1 ' Value 

"Foreign Trade Tips," a bulletin 
published weekly by the San Fran- 
cisco Chamber's World Trade Depart- 
ment, reports inquiries from all over 
the world for San Francisco Bay 
Region products, and offers of com- 
modities seeking a market here. 

• "We have been following these 
'Tips' ever since 1910 or 1911. We 
have had many, many connections 
develop through these 'Tips'. We have 
sold more merchandise over all these 
years (thanks to the 'Tips') than we 
can possibly compute in dollars and 
cents at this time." 

• "We probably get several thou- 
sands of dollars worth of business a 
year from them." 

• "This information has proved 
useful to this office in establishing 
contacts between California and Mexi- 
can inquirers, and in actually materi- 
alizing trade transactions." 

• "In one instance we were able 
to secure a foreign representative in 
a foreign market through whom we 
have sold about $50,000 worth of 
goods." 



• Important policies of the Fed- 
eral Government in regard to the 
disposition of commodities surplus to 
the needs of the Federal Government 
are presented in a letter recently re- 
ceived by G. L. Fox, Manager of the 
Chamber's Industrial Department, 
from F. G. Moyer, Chief, Property 
Utilization Division, Treasury De- 
partment, San Francisco. In part the 
letter was as follows : 

"It has been customary, here- 
tofore, to publicly advertise sur- 
plus items with the award being 
made to the highest bidder. How- 
ever, with the exception of items 
which may be categoried as junk, 
obsolete, or properties requiring 
major repair, there will be very few 
instances in the future in which 
these surpluses will be sold by 
competitive bid, since it is our 
desire to move all such surplus 
properties, which are not required 
by Federal Agencies or Tax-Sup- 
ported Institutions, into normal 
channels of distribution, and this 
objective, we believe, can be at- 
tained through direct negotiation 
rather than the former method. 

"It is our hope that, in this manner, 
we will be able to develop and main- 
tain a steady flow of governmental 
surpluses into normal trade activities, 
wherein absorption of the various 
commodities will have a beneficial 
rather than an inflationary effect 
upon the civilian economy. 

"This action will, of course, 
eliminate definitely any consid- 
eration being given to individuals 
or companies who operate on a 
speculative basis, or in fields of 
enterprise foreign to their normal 
activities. 

"We recognize the prominent 
position that the various Cham- 
ber of Commerce organizations 
will play in this National problem 
and we earnestly solicit your co- 
operation in its successful ac- 
complishment, and the dissemi- 
nation of this information to your 
colleagues and affiliates. 

"You may be interested in knowing 
that our field representatives will 
be glad to call upon any of your mem- 
bers to discuss more fully the rami- 
fications of the program, and the 
manner in which surplus items can 
be obtained by negotiation. In addi- 
tion thereto, this office will be glad 
to receive queries direct from inter- 
ested concerns, relative to items in 
which they are particularly inter- 
ested." 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Thursday, April 27, 1944 



WEEKLY RADIO EVENTS 



The WAR OF ENTERPRISE, 
KSFO, every Tuesday, 12:45 P.M. 

• This series dramatizes the war- 
time accomplishments of American 
business and industry. Produced by 
the U. S. Chamber of Commerce, it is 
sponsored in San Francisco by the 
San Francisco Chamber. 

BUSINESS VIEWS THE NEWS, 
KQW, every Saturday at 3:15 
P.M. 

• This Saturday, April 29, will 
feature the San Francisco Women's 
"Work Pile." Guests— Mrs. Hulda 
McGinn, chairman, Women's "Work 
Pile," and Miss Marguerite Downing, 
president, Women's Roundtable. 

OPEN UP THOSE GOLDEN 
GATES! KJBS, every Sunday at 
7:30 P.M. 

• This Sunday, April 30, will fea- 
ture "Industry Marches West — Will 
the San Francisco Bay Area Lead?" 
Guests — Roland Tognazzini, Union 
Sugar Co.; E. L. Mathy, Victor 
Equipment Co.; R. E. Fisher, Pacific 
Gas & Electric Co. 



Business Men and Cof C Men 
Comment on Weekly Bulletin 

Letters of comment on Bay Region 
Business are still coming in from in- 
dividual businessmen and Chambers 
of Commerce throughout California 
and the nation. 

• "I am especially glad to note," 
writes Ben B. Lawshe, manager Com- 
mercial Organization Department, 
U. S. Chamber, "that part of the 
text as well as the name seems to 
reflect the broader scope of interest 
and activity which the San Francisco 
Chamber is seeking to attain." 

• "I think that the opportunity 
presented to our various groups is one 
of the finest yet to be extended by the 
San Francisco Chamber," said J. D. 
Sarber, vice president & general man- 
ager, Berkeley Chamber. 

• "I particularly like the title," 
comments R. W. Adams, Employee 
Relations Manager, Marinship Corp. 
"This infers that it is a cooperative 
publication with the interest of all the 
Bay Region at heart." 

• "An overall publication of this 
sort has long been needed and I be- 
lieve will be the answer," wrote Ross 
H. Ryder, president, Ryder & In- 
gram, Ltd. 



Bay Region "Work Pile" Totals Mount 

San Jose Completes; Oakland Reports 



KQW Starts Air Series 
of Education Programs 
Keyed to Pacific Basin 

A new venture in western edu- 
cational programs will be pre- 
sented in a series Monday through 
Friday (1:30-2:00 P.M.) by Radio 
Station KQW, starting Monday, 
May 1. 

Cooperating are Public Schools of 
San Francisco, Oakland, Alameda, 
Redwood City, Palo Alto, and San 
Jose. 

• This local series, the "KQW 
School of the Air," will continue until 
the middle of June. 

Planning this series to cover the 
Pacific Area, and assisting schools 
in developing material, is Louise 
E. Taber, Education Director of 
KQW, long known as the "Cali- 
fornia Historian." 

• Student-acted — These local pro- 
grams are being enacted by public 
school students. 



Published weekly at 333 Pine St., San 
Francisco, Zone 4, County of San 
Francisco, California. Will Williams, 
Editor. Telephone EXbrook 45 11 . Sub- 
scription, Fifty Cents a Year (Included 
in Annual Dues). 

Application for Second Class Permit 
pending. 



San Jose's "Work Pile" is com- 
plete, totaling $21,116,423. 

Oakland's initial report has 
started this city off with a total 
of $2,123,000 for its "Work Pile." 

Alameda, Richmond and many 
other communities throughout the 
Bay Region are getting their "Work 
Pile" campaigns underway. 

• San Jose's "Work Pile" cam- 
paign, sponsored by the Chamber of 
Commerce, rolled up its total under 
the chairmanship of J.S. C. Ross. 

The drive was handled under di- 
visions — industrial, business district, 
public buildings, residential and 
rural; it opened February 21 and was 
completed by March 17. 

Bernard M. Baruch, personal 
adviser to President Roosevelt, 
sent congratulations to San Jose 
Chamber on the Campaign's suc- 
cess. 

• Oakland's modernization and ex- 
pansion program totaling $2,123,000 
has been contributed by Oakland 
department stores, the first division 
in the city-wide "Work Pile" program. 

R. H. Biggs, chairman, Oakland 
Chamber of Commerce "Work 
Pile for Oakland Committee," 
pointed out that sizeable num- 
bers of business firms are com- 
pleting surveys in postwar mod- 
ernization, repairs, expansions, 
and general expenditures to pro- 
vide jobs to local residents. 

Similar surveys to the one com- 
pleted are now being conducted by 
paint manufacturers, office building 
groups, and auto and truck dealers, 
Biggs said. 



The San Francisco Chamber of Commerce 

333 Pin* St., San Francisco 4 
EXbrook 4511 




^>6Uwe&L 



PUBLISHED BY THE 

SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 



Volume I 



Thursday, May 4, 1944 



Number 5 



Thumb Nail Sketch 



Monthly Survey of Business Activity 



Summary by 

The Research Department 

San Francisco Chamber 

of Commerce 

• Bay Region war supply con- 
tracts for February amounted to 
$76,017,000. Ship contracts accounted 
for $69,589,000 of this amount, ord- 
nance for $195,000, and $6,233,000 
was unclassified. Industrial facility 
contracts during January (the latest 
available) amounted to $7,591,000. 
The combined increase of $83,608,000 
carried the cumulative Bay Region 
war supply and facility contracts and 
project orders to $4,341,744,000. 

• San Francisco Industrial Area 
(five counties) manufacturing indus- 
tries' March reports reveal 259,600 
people compared to 266,900 in Feb- 
ruary and 269,000 in March last year. 

Despite the shrinkage in the 
number of persons employed, 
March payrolls in the manufac- 
turing industries were up 5.2 per 
cent above last March due to the 
increase in the average workweek 
from 43.5 to 45 hours and the 
average hourly earnings from 
$1,261 to $1,326. 

During the first quarter, manu- 
facturing industries' employment was 
up 0.4 per cent and payrolls 9.5 per 
cent over the similar period last year. 
In the non-manufacturing industries, 
hotels reported the largest increase 
of 20.2 per cent in payrolls in March 
compared to last March, and 19.8 per 
cent for the first quarter. 

• Department Store Sales. Bay 
Region March department store sales 
rose 19 per cent over last March. 
Sales in the Central Valley were up 



22 per cent with Fresno reporting the 
top gain of 44 per cent. 

In Los Angeles sales were up 28 per 
cent; San Diego, 12 per cent; Seattle, 
4 per cent ; and California, 24 per cent. 
Sales in the District were up 16 per 
cent. 

• March bank debits in the Bay 

Region were $300,000,000 above last 
March and totaled $2,177,684,000 
compared to $2,008,985,000 in Feb- 
ruary and $1,873,352,000 last March. 
The first quarter cumulative was 24 
per cent over last year. Bank debits 
for the Los Angeles area in March 
totaled $2,097,385,000. 

• Freight movements based on 
March carloadings in the San Fran- 
cisco-Oakland Switching Limits of 
68,510 cars were 5,888 cars above 
last March with the cumulative for 
the first quarter up 19,662 cars, 
bringing the total to 193,125 cars. 

• San Francisco business activity 

during March rose abruptly from the 
February level. Measured by our in- 



SAN FRANCISCO 

BUSINESS ACTIVITY 

UNADJUSTED INDEX 1935-1939 = 100" 




dex at 191.2, March business was 8.7 
per cent above February and 16.9 per 
cent over last March. Activity during 
the first quarter was 16.9 per cent 
over last year. 

• Building permits issued in San 
Francisco during March amounted to 
$3,690,000. Of this amount $3,318,000 
was for war housing to provide 1,415 
family accommodations in addition to 
two large war housing dormitories. 

The permits included provisions 
for 173 single-family dwellings; 
also, 158 buildings of the multi- 
family type to accommodate 1,240 
families. The multi-family proj- 
ects and the two dormitories are 
temporary war housing being con- 
structed by the San Francisco 
Housing Authority. 

With the exception of 140 dwelling 
units in the former Japtown area 
which will be for in-migrant war work- 
ers, the remaining are for housing 
civilian employees of the Hunter's 
Point Navy Yard. 

The first quarter cumulative per- 
mits for new residential construction 
of 529 amounting to $4,456,600 are in 
wide contrast to the first quarter 
total in 1943, which amounted to one 
permit for $1,200. 

The demand for housing still 
far exceeds the supply, according 
to reports from the San Francisco 
War Housing Center and the Naval 
Housing Service which indicate 
that the number of applications 
are ranging from three to four 
times the number of available 
dwellings. 

• Some of the other local fields 

(Continued on Page Two) 



Business Activity Edition 



Vol. 15, No. 3 of Business Activity Series 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Thursday, May 4, 1944 



Monthly Survey of 
Business Activity 

— Continued from Page One 

which made a strong showing in 
March compared to last March in- 
cluded real estate with the number of 
sales up 64.5 per cent and 19.4 per 
cent in value, with the first quarter 
value up 100.9 per cent. 

March postal receipts were up 172.5 
per cent with the first quarter up 
166.7 per cent. 

Industrial placements were 30.2 
per cent over last March. 

San Francisco Airport traffic during 
March was up 19 per cent with the 
first quarter total up 22.7 per cent, 
and air mail up 79.3 and 115.4 percent 
respectively. 

Sales of electrical energy during 
March were up 13.4 per cent, and 
the first quarter was up 18.9 per 
cent. 

Retail sales in San Francisco were 
up 20.5 per cent in March with the 
three months' cumulative up 5.4 per 
cent. 

Living costs in the Bay Region 
in March were 0.3 per cent above 
February and 1 per cent over 
March last year, with the cumula- 
tive up 1.8 per cent for the first 
quarter. 



Market Street Group 
Approves C of C Stand 
on "Right to Work" 

"The Market Street Association 
is in agreement with the San 
Francisco Chamber of Commerce, 
the State Chamber of Commerce, 
the San Francisco Employers' 
Council and the other organiza- 
tions who are opposed to the pres- 
entation of the so-called "Right of 
Employment" Initiative Amend- 
ment, before the voters at the 
coming election in November." 

Thus wrote Lloyd Taylor, Execu- 
tive Secretary of the Market Street 
Association, in a letter to Louis B. 
Lundborg, general manager of the San 
Francisco Chamber. 

"This Association believes that a 
signature on the initiative petition is 
a definite blow at the industrial peace 
and harmony that are so vitally neces- 
sary to the war effort," Taylor said. 



DOMESTICTRADETIPS 



A digest of correspondence received 
from those desiring, or offering, lines 
of merchandise for representation. 
They are listed here as a service with- 
out necessarily bearing endorsement 
by the Chamber. For further details, 
contact the Domestic Trade Depart- 
ment, EXbrook 4511, Ext. 74. 

D-6002— STEPHEN J. OILMAN, Pres., 
Druggists' Market Reports, Inc., 299 Madi- 
son Avenue, New York City, desires to 
represent western manufacturers in the New 
York and New England areas. 

D-6003— HARMON OIL COMPANY, 
INC., 281 Chapel Street, New Haven, Conn., 
wishes to handle some type of well-known 
merchandise on a wholesale distributorship 
basis, in addition to present business in the 
State of Connecticut or the New England 
Territorv. 

D-6004— E. E. WINTERS COMPANY, 
1104 Gayley, West Los Angeles, 24, Calif., 
wants San Francisco salesman for imported 
and domestic leather goods. 

D-6005— GEORGE W. RICHEY 
AGENCY, 923 Transit Tower, San An- 
tonio, 5, Texas, wishes to represent San 
Francisco manufacturer in the Southwest. 

D-6006 — ASSOCIATED PRODUCERS, 
415 Lewis Building, Portland, 4, Oregon, 
wishes to contact manufacturers looking for 
sales representation in the Pacific Northwest. 

D-6007— MILLE FLEURS, 1 19 West 23rd 
Street, New York City, 11, manufacturers of 
novelty jewelry, wish representation in the 
State of California. 



"Foreign Trade Tips" List 
Available Free to Members 

Are you on the San Francisco 
Chamber's mailing list to receive 
"Foreign Trade Tips" bulletin 
published weekly by the World 
Trade Department? 

"Foreign Trade Tips," according to 
members (Bay Region Business, April 
27) have "dollars and cents" value. 
• To Receive these "Tips," pro- 
vided free of charge to San Francisco 
Chamber of Commerce members, 
please call the World Trade Depart- 
ment, EXbrook 4511. 



Chamber Action Endorsed 

The Fresno County Chamber of 
Commerce has adopted a resolution 
identical to that of the San Francisco 
and other Pacific Coast chambers of 
commerce urging that western in- 
dustries be afforded the fullest oppor- 
tunity to use available manpower and 
plant facilities to meet war needs. 

It has been claimed that stringent 
procurement directives have withheld 
needed work from Coast communities. 

Word of the Fresno County Cham- 
ber's action was received in a notice 
from M. P. Lohse, executive secretary. 



Renegotiation Deadlines Set 
For Subject Firms' Report To 
Price Adjustment Board 

The Chamber has been asked to 
notify all firms subject to renego- 
tiation that they must file reports 
with their Price Adjustment 
Boards. 

As required by the 1943 Revenue 
Act, this includes subject firms, 
whether previously renegotiated or 
not. 

• Filing a report is mandatory on 
such contractors whose total prime 
and subcontract business with the 
Navy Department, any branch of the 
War Department, Maritime Com- 
mission, Treasury Department, De- 
fense Plant Corporation, and other 
RFC subsidiaries, or War Shipping 
Commission was in excess of $100,000 
for any fiscal year ending June 30, 
1943 or exceeded $500,000 for any 
subsequent fiscal year. 

However, agents, brokers, and 
sales engineers, or those who do 
their selling on a commission 
basis are required to file if their 
total annual business with the 
agencies was $25,000 or more. 

• The report is to be filed with the 
War Contracts Price Adjustment 
Board, Assignments and Statistics 
Branch, Renegotiation Division, 
Room 3D573, The Pentagon, Wash- 
ington 25, D. C, unless requested 
otherwise by mail. 

Reporting deadline is June 1 
for contractors whose fiscal year 
closed before March 1, 1944, and 
within three months after the 
close of any later fiscal year. 

Three different forms are available: 
(1) Standard form for supply con- 
tracts; (2) Special form for con- 
struction, architects, and engineers 
contracts; (3) Special form for agents, 
brokers, and sales engineers. 

• Forms will be mailed to known 
contractors believed subject to rene- 
gotiation. Other firms may obtain 
them from the office whose address is 
given above. 

Firms that have filed identical 
information previously need sub- 
mit only a statement as to time 
and place of that filing. 

We Don't Care 

For Whom You Vote 

But VOTE! 

GENERAL CITY 

ELECTION MAY 15 

CONSOLIDATED PRIMARY 

ELECTION MAY 16 

GENERAL ELECTION NOV. 7 



Thursday, May 4, 1944 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Survey of Business Conditions in San Francisco 



BRANCH OF ACTIVITY 



Residential. New 

Single - tain lly Dwellings, 

Non-reaidentlel, New ... 

Addns. , Alts. & Rprs- . . . 

Installations 

REAL ESTATE 
Sales 



number) 
(value) 
number) 

(value) 
number) 



number) 
( value ) 
number) 



Mortgages it Deeds of Trust. . (number) 

Releases (number) 

(amount) 
RETAIL DPARTMENT STORE SALES 

San Francisco (Index) 

12th Fed. Reserve District. . .(Index) 

FINANCE 

Bank Debits ($000) 

Bank Clearings ($000) 

Postal Receipts ($) 

S.F. Stock Exch..(no. shares traded) 
(market value) 

COMMERCIAL FAILURES (number) 

Liabilities 1$) 

Asset e ($) 

MANUFACTURING - Bay Area (5 Co' s) (a) 

Employment .(Index) 

Payrolls (Index) 



Wholesale Trade (Payroll) 

Retail Trade (Payroll) 

Hotels (Payroll) 

EMPLOYMENT IH SAN FRAMCISCO-O.S.E.S. 



TRANSPORTATION 

Carloads (number) 

S.F. Airport Traffic (no. planes) 

(no. passengers) 
Express Shipments - Rail. .. .(number) 

Air (number) 

Air Mall Loaded (pounds) 

UTILITIES fc NEW DEVELOPMENTS 
Elec. Energy Sales Index.. (k . w . hrs . ) 

Indus, k Com'l Gas Sales (cu.ft.) 

Water Consumers (net gain) 

Tourist k Settler Inquiries. (number) 

DAIRY RECEIPTS, FRUITS &. VEGETABLES 

Butter (pounds) 

Cheese (pounds) 



LIVESTOCK SLAUGHTER ( b I (total number) 

Cattle (number) 

Calves (number) 

Sheep & Lambs (number) 

Hogs (number) 

S. F, LrvTSQ COSTS 1935-39 Ave. = 100 

Food ( Index) 

Clothing ( Index) 

Rent (Index) 

Fuel and Light (Index) 

House Furnishing Goods (Index) 

Miscellaneous (Index) 

All I terns ( Index) 



3,690,900 

173 

3,318,900 



11,725 

1,186 

11,764,308 
1,249 

8,257,376 
1,256 

6.864,703 



10,144 
8,987 
1,157 



132 


222.7 


1,133 


122,356 


2916.5 


5,517,052 
529 

4,456,600 
527 

1,722,600 


2.200 


335.9 


68, §15 


123 


46.3 




119,621 


193.2 


962,017 




1116.7 


157 


535 


2091.6 


29 , 5?0 


721 


64.5 


3,133 


6,125,461 


92.4 


29,012,240 




62.2 


3,182 


4,923,439 


67.7 


22,576,360 


1,118 


12.5 




6,302,060 


8.9 


24,950,437 



1,456,291 

1,117,490 

1,323,534 

670,159 

7,809,498 



14,166 

279,651 

7,245 

311,763 



143.7 
128.1 
106.0 



150.8 
139.1 
126.3 



32,679 

29,914 
3,312 



409,663 

6,811,889 

5,184 

558,244 

93,663 
15,606 
242,058 

206,717 

142.5 



"■» 


26. 


335,818 


186. 


13 




1,835 


1508. 


1,926 


62. 


,439,573 


100. 


1,975 


61. 


,487,533 


80. 


3,124 


16. 


,539,802 


34. 



,969,940 


22. 


,025,771 


16. 


,262,561 




,444,491 


9. 


,353,584 


27. 


5 


20. 


21,488 


142. 


1,425 


334. 



3,343 


22. 


39,117 


14. 


754,598 


11. 


20,336 


10. 


824,400 


115. 


148 


18. 


878,932,800 


-29. 



9,608,167 


-26.6 


4,374,011 




333,223 


22. S 


6,488,204 


5.1 


5,013 


3.4 


444,373 


25. 


70,835 


32. 


7,526 


107. 


222,320 




143,693 


43. 


142.2 


0. 


126.5 


5. 


105.5 


0. 


92.9 


-0. 


119.0 


1. 


120.3 




125.0 


1. 



(a) 


Thasa data are based on re 
State, of California. 


ports suMltul to 


the Division 


[b] 


Federal Inspection - San F 


renclsco DJ.tpl.t. 






Acknowledgment Is hereby m 


ade to Tbomas Mage 


s k Sons. Dun 




organizations, Federal Hes 


erve Bank of San F 


•anclsco, Cal 




Relations, Agriculture, an 


d Employment, and 


:he United St* 




Commerce, and the United S 




e Census, for 




survey complied oy the kes 


earch Department, 


San Francisco 



1 Enforcement. 



State Departments of Industrial 
partments of Labor. Agriculture, 
ale data each contributed toward 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Thursday, May 4, 1944 



Current Bay Region News Digest 



• The Federal Government on 
April 3 acquired title to Treasure 
Island as a permanent naval base, 
"free and clear" of all claims by the 
city and State, as well as all land 
needed by the government at the San 
Francisco airport as a seaplane base 
for the duration of the war. 

The government agreed to turn 
over to San Francisco within two 
years after the end of the war 
$10,000,000 worth of its facilities 
for the Municipal Airport at Mills 
Field, including land base run- 
ways and seaplane installations 
for the largest planes now in use 
or on blue print. 

• The Ryan Aeronautical Co. has 

applied to the Civil Aeronautics 
Board for permission to operate 2100 
route miles of new air lines to serve 
84 California cities not previously on 
the airline map, according to a recent 
announcement by the Company. 

Under the application, it is pro- 
posed that the San Francisco Bay 
Region will be the hub for four new 
lines terminating at Los Angeles, 
Bakersfield, Eureka and Redding. 

• Plans for financing a $25,000,000 
sewer program, to be paid for over 
a 20-year period, by which San Fran- 
cisco's inadequate system would be 
modernized, was submitted recently 
to the Mayor by the Chief Adminis- 
trative Officer following an extensive 
study made by the Department of 
Public Works. 

• Three steps for rebuilding large 
sections of the blighted areas in the 
City after the war are under consid- 
eration by the San Francisco Housing 
and Planning Association. 

They include: (1) adoption of a 
state development law; (2) assem- 
bly of basic facts about conditions, 
taxes, upkeep, costs, price and 
population; and (3) architectural 
studies to indicate rebuilding plan 
with the best use of open space, 
recreation facilities, schools, 
and housing plans. 

The local Housing Authority and 



Published weekly at 333 Pine St., San 
Francisco, Zone 4, County of San 
Francisco, California. Will Williams, 
Editor. Telephone EXbrook 4511. Sub- 
scription, Fifty Cents a Year (Included 
in Annual Dues). 

Application for Second Class Permit 
pending. 



Planning Commission are now re- 
ported making studies in the Western 
Addition with Step No. 2. 

• Real Estate is experiencing one 

of the most active periods in recent 
years, according to first quarter re- 
ports which show 3,133 sales amount- 
ing to $29,012,240, which is more 
than double the value of this same 
period last year. At the same time 
mortgage releases and reconveyances 
against 3,639 properties and valued 
at $24,950,437 have been effected. 

• San Francisco has retained the 

enviable position of leader among 25 
major American cities in having the 
lowest available municipal utility 
bill, according to the California Rail- 



WASHINGTON NOTES 

According to a last-minute 
communication from Frank 
E. Marsh, manager, Cham- 
ber's Washington Office, Con- 
gress is planning to recess 
mid-June. 

• Six major pieces of legis- 
lation are pending : 

(1) Renewal of Price Control 

(2) Extension of Lend-Lease 

(3) Debt Limit Boost to 
$260,000,000,000. 

(4) Simplified Tax Bill 

(5) Bill to expedite War Con- 
tract Termination 

(6) Poll Tax legislation 
Also pending are a number 

of appropriations bills. 



The San Francisco Chamber ol Commerce 

333 Pine St., Son FranclKO 4 
EXbrook 4511 



road Commission, which reported the 
combined monthly charges for gas, 
electricity and telephone for the aver- 
age family at $7.20. 

• Whereas, some 1500 workmen 

in manufacturing plants were reported 
by the local director for the War 
Manpower Commission to have left 
their jobs during the first two months 
of the year, most of them to be rehired 
on more vital war jobs in the area, an 
additional 27,536 persons were needed 
immediately in several places. 

They were: ship repair, 2,300; 
landing craft and shipbuilding, 
4,736; waterfront and port ac- 
tivities, 2,500; warehousing and 
trucking, 2,300; railroad opera- 
tion, 600; food processing, 500; 
local transit and utilities, 900; 
local necessary trades and serv- 
ices, 5,700; and other manufac- 
turing, 6,200. 

• Top national honors for ship- 
building in Maritime Commission 
contract yards during March went to 
the Permanente Metals Corp. at 
Richmond, which produced 23 Lib- 
erty ships, according to an announce- 
ment from Washington. 

• The Oakland Naval Supply De- 
pot has become the U. S. Navy's 
largest coastal supply center, accord- 
ing to reports from the Twelfth Naval 
District office. 

The office announced that this 
link between the production line 
and the firing line handled almost 
200 freight cars of goods daily and 
employed approximately 8000 
civilians, 2000 enlisted personnel, 
and more than 300 officers. 




SW ^eaim SuMae&i. 



" W PUBtlSHfD BY 1 



PUBLISHED BY THE 

SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 



Volume I 



Thursday, May 11, 1944 



Number 6 



Shipbuilding Beneficial 
to Small West Firms 
According to Survey 

Because of widespread interest in 
the welfare of small business, the 
Chamber's Industrial Department has 
analyzed reports recently received 
from the Small Business Section, Pro- 
curement Division, U. S. Maritime 
Commission, showing the amount of 
work placed with small business firms 
in behalf of Pacific Coast shipyards 
during the month of March. 

During this period purchase 
orders were issued to 519 small 
firms in seven western states who 
regularly employ 28,889 workers. 

• For the month orders totaled 
$4,483,036 and were placed by or in 
behalf of 16 shipyards and the con- 
struction and outfitting offices of the 
Maritime Commission. 

• The placements for March 

brought the totals for the period 
from August 1, 1943 to March 31, 
1944 to 623 prime contracts to small 
firms (employing 500 or less) amount- 
ing to $26,980,259. Subcontracts in 
the 11 western states for the period 
aggregated 7,795 and amounted to 
$16,443,991. 

• During the seven months, Sep- 
tember 1943 to March 1944, the 
Oakland Office of the Maritime Com- 
mission issued a total of 1,278 pur- 
chase orders for a total of $50,564,495, 
49.1% going to small business for 
purchases totaling 51.6% of total dol- 
lar volume of orders. 

Of the 591 firms with which 
business was placed during March 
for a total of $4,483,036, 279 were 
in Northern California and re- 
ceived $3,408,695 in business; 157 
in Southern California, $755,006; 
67 in Oregon, $250,740, and 12 in 
Washington, $29,904. 



Almon E. Roth Will Speak at 
National Maritime Day Lunch 



State Port Authorities 
Suspend Increases In 
Dockage Charges Here 

The California Association of Port 
Authorities on May 2 decided to sus- 
pend indefinitely the increases in 
wharfage and dockage rates, pub- 
lished to become effective June 16, by 
the Board of State Harbor Commis- 
sioners, San Francisco, and the Port 
of,Oakland. 

• The Chamber, among others, 
protested vigorously to the Harbor 
Board and Maritime Commission that 
the increases were not warranted. 

It is expected that the Maritime 
Commission will now discontinue 
the investigation which it had 
ordered concerning the propriety 
and lawfulness of these increases. 



"Right to Work" Measure 
Opposed by 3 More Groups 

The San Francisco Board of Super- 
visors, United Employers, Inc., of 
Oakland, and the San Bernardino 
Chamber of Commerce have now 
added their opposition to the initia- 
tive petition entitled "Right of Em- 
ployment." 

The San Francisco Chamber has 
formally announced its opposi- 
tion to this initiative proposal on 
the grounds that such an issue 
will cause dissension between in- 
dustry and labor at a time when 
it is most vital to unite for prose- 
cution of the war. 
• These three groups in voicing 
their opposition have supported the 
stand taken by the San Francisco 
Chamber, the State Chamber, and the 
San Francisco Employers' Council. 



Almon E. Roth, president, Na- 
tional Federation of American 
Shipping, will be speaker at the 
National Maritime Day Luncheon, 
May 22, in the Commercial Club, 
according to an announcement by 
the San Francisco Junior Cham- 
ber Marine Committee. 

• The luncheon and other celebra- 
tions will be held in commemoration 
of the first transatlantic crossing by 
an American Steamship, the Savan- 
nah, on May 22, 1819. All events will 
honor the American Merchant Ma- 
rine and the men who build and sail 
the ships. 

Roth will speak on "The Amer- 
ican Merchant Marine — its Pres- 
ent and Future." 

• Co-sponsors with the Junior 
Chamber are the Propeller Club, 
Marine Exchange, Foreign Trade As- 
sociation, the San Francisco Chamber, 
andtheSanFranciscoCommercialClub. 

Immediately preceding the lunch- 
eon, at 11:30 on the floor of the 
Marine Exchange, Commander Mal- 
colm E. Crossman, Superintendent, 
U. S. Maritime Service Officers School, 
Alameda, will present posthumous 
awards to Merchant Marine heroes. 



Richard D.Brigham Appointed 
Chairman Membership Group 

Richard D. Brigham, vice presi- 
dent and member, board of di- 
rectors for the Anglo-California 
National Bank, has been ap- 
pointed chairman of the San 
Francisco Chamber's Membership 
Committee. 

• Brigham has been active in 
Chamber committee work as mem- 
ber of the Naval Affairs, Domestic 
Trade, and Bankers' "Work Pile" 
committees. 



Foreign Trade Luncheon Announcement • Page 3 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Thursday, May 11, 1944 



Foreign Trade Promotion on 
Bay Region Basis Underway 



Foreign trade promotion on a uni- 
fied Bay Regional basis is now being 
advanced for the postwar future by 
the Bay Region Foreign Trade Pro- 
motion Committee. 

Organizations joining in the 
program are chambers of com- 
merce of Alameda, Berkeley, Oak- 
land, Richmond, San Jose, San 
Francisco, and Sunnyvale; the 
Foreign Trade Association of the 
San Francisco Chamber, and the 
Oakland Foreign Trade and Har- 
bor Club. 

• Now being considered are (1) 
preparation of a Bay Region Index 



or Directory of manufacturers and 
products, and all elements embraced 
by the Foreign Trade fraternity; (2) 
a foreign trade conference to instruct 
manufacturers not heretofore partici- 
pating in foreign trade in "know- 
how" of exporting and importing; 
(3) operation as a one-for-all agency 
in behalf of all Bay Region chambers 
and foreign trade organizations one 
Bay Region World Trade Department. 
Temporary chairman of the Bay 
Region Foreign Trade Promotion 
Committee is Phil A. Hoyt, Chair- 
man, Oakland Chamber's Foreign 
Trade Committee. 



Chamber Stand on City, 
State Ballot Measures 

The following is the San Francisco 
Chamber of Commerce position on 
Ballot Measures: 

• CITY CHARTER AMEND- 
MENTS 

No. 1, Purchase Market Street 
Railway — vote yes. San Francisco 
has a limited business area and must 
have adequate transportation facili- 
ties to get people in and out with 
speed, safety and comfort. Joint use 
of all facilities, and a single fare with 
universal transfer are vital require- 
ments for any first class city trans- 
portation system. This can only be 
properly secured by the purchase of 
the Market Street Railway. For 30 
years the transportation problem has 
hindered San Francisco's growth and 
development. The Mayor, Labor 
Groups, Municipal Committees and 
foremost citizens have endorsed this 
plan — a new plan, based on sound 
business principles and self-sustain- 
ing. The Market Street Railway Sys- 
tem at present earns $1,500,000 per 
year, and under municipal ownership 
will pay for itself in three years. From 
that time on a very substantial sur- 
plus will accumulate which will be 
the means of giving San Francisco an 



CLIP AND TAKE TO POLLS 

Vote yes No. 1 Vote no No. 4 
Vote yes No. 2 Vote yes No. 5 
Vote yes No. 3 Vote yes No. 6 
State Proposition No. 1, 
vote yes. 
VOTE TUESDAY, MAY 16 



outstanding transportation system. 
Why wait for years for the expiration 
of the franchises and then start to 
build? 

No. 2, Military Leaves of Absence 
— City Employees — vote yes. 

No. 3, Transfer of Disabled Civil 
Service Workers — vote yes. 

No. 4, Fire Department Pay Raise 
— vote no. 

No. 5, Fire Commission may allow 
firemen to work on days off and be 
paid therefor — vote yes. No. 4 and 
5 are considered together. The uni- 
formed members of the San Fran- 
cisco Fire Department have stated 
their need for additional money with 
which to support their families in this 
war period. The equity of this request 
is recognized, but the Chamber be- 
lieves the proper way for firemen to 
increase their earnings is through the 
passage of Amendment No. 5 and not 
No. 4. The Fire Department is in 
need of additional personnel, and the 
firemen have stated that they have 
time outside of their days in the fire 
department to do additional work. 
Charter Amendment No. 5 maintains 
whereas No. 4 violates the principle 
of the National Standardization pro- 
gram as expressed by President Roose- 
velt. The Fire Commission actively 
supports Amendment No. 5, but was 
given no opportunity to consider 
No. 4. 

No. 6, Stabilize hours of work in 
Police Department and Commission 
may require additional service and 
give compensation therefor — vote 
yes. 
•STATE CONSTITUTIONAL 
AMENDMENT 

State Proposition No. 1, Taxation 
of Federal Property (SCA No. 2)— 
vote yes. 



WASHINGTON NOTES 



• Considerable progress is being 
made in Washington toward the es- 
tablishment of a plan whereby pro- 
curement officers of the Government 
would be required to submit proposed 
contracts to Area Production Ur- 
gency Committees. These Commit- 
tees would screen the contracts and 
determine the ability of production 
facilities in the area to handle them. 

• Procurement officers in Wash- 
ington are apparently still receiving 
conflicting reports on the manpower 
situation in the Bay Region. Some are 
proceeding on the theory that there 
is no excess of manpower of any kind 
available and that the production 
facilities of the Bay Region are fully 
occupied with war production. 

This difference of opinion has 
been brought about through in- 
formation reaching Washington 
from procurement officers on the 
Coast and from the fact that the 
Bay Area is still a No. 1 critical 
labor area. 

There have been many cases where 
invitations to bid have not even been 
submitted to small plants in the Bay 
Region, although these plants could, 
from the reports of the plants them- 
selves, take on additional contracts 
without the necessity of increasing 
present manpower ceilings. 

• Early reestablishment of com- 
munications with the Philippines, 
access to properties, availability of 
shipping space, and priorities for re- 
construction materials and equip- 
ment following reoccupation of the 
Philippines, continue to be under dis- 
cussion in Washington. 

Senate Resolution 94, which 
was passed by the Senate in De- 
cember, 1943, appears to be headed 
for approval, with certain clari- 
fying amendments. 

• The San Francisco Women's 
"Work Pile" has received consider- 
able interest in the Nation's Capital. 
A number of communities have re- 
quested information as to the success 
of the program in order that a similar 
plan can be instituted. 

• The new War Contracts Price 
Adjustment Board has issued the 
first installment of renegotiation regu- 
lations, which deals with the author- 
ity and organization of the Board, 
forms for mandatory filing, procedures 
and details concerning applicable 
statutes and Executive Orders. 

The official text of the regula- 
tions can be secured through our 
Washington Office. 

/ 



Thursday, May 11, 1944 BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Thoughts for Foreign Traders 

A luncheon climax to National Foreign Trade Week 
in San Francisco 

featuring 

WILBERT WARD 

Vice-President, The National City Bank of New York 
1944 President, Bankers' Association for Foreign Trade 

IN THE GOLD ROOM, FAIRMONT HOTEL 

Wednesday, May 24, 1944 

Sponsored by 

Foreign Trade Association of the San Francisco Chamber of Commerce 

in cooperation^witb 

San Francisco Chamber of Commerce 

Junior Foreign Trade Association 

San Francisco Junior Chamber of Commerce 

The Propeller Club of the United States, Port of San Francisco 



>AN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE . T , 

At Luncheon in 
533 Pine Street, San Francisco, California 

Please reserve_ place(s) for me at $1.50 each at 1 lie IjOlO IVOOffl 

uncheon honoring Wilbert Ward on Wednesday, May 24th in Fairmnnt TTrktpl 

he Gold Room, Fairmont] Hotel, at 12:00 noon. (Kindly enclose rdlrmUIll X1.ULC1 

ielf-addressed envelope for forwarding tickets.) Wednesday Noon, May 24, 1944 

Price $1.50 per plate 
Name { $1-46 plus 4c tax ) 



Pheck Firm 

5 . i R.S.V.P. Members will be taken care of tc 

L.nC!OSea Address ' n * limit of capacity and as received, but ii 

will be to your advantage to make reserva- 
tions early before ticket sales are opened tc 
\ __^____^___^_________^___^^___^___ tbe general public. 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Thursday, May 11, 1944 



Official War Movies 
Available to Plants for 
War Worker Shows 

Three of the latest official war films 
are now available for war plant show- 
ings, according to an announcement 
by Major Melville H. Ruick, Indus- 
trial Services Officer, Labor Branch, 
Ninth Service Command. 

"These films," Major Ruick 
stated, "portray latest develop- 
ments and progress on the war, 
and point up the war workers' 
participation and responsibility 
for keeping the fighting men sup- 
plied on all our battle fronts." 
• Films now available are: (1) 
EARTHMOVERS, illustrating the 
use of American-built engineering 
equipment in combat areas; (2) FILM 
COMMUNIQUE NO. 5, including 
"Bloody Tarawa"; (3) THE CASE 
OF THE TREMENDOUS TRIFLE, 
dramatizing the important role of 
small parts and the workers who 
make them. 



Harvest Council Names 
New 1944 Committees 

The San Francisco Wartime Harvest 
Council has announced the following 
committee appointments: 

Executive Committee: Purpose 
— Coordination of activities of the 
various special committees and 
transaction of routine business. 
Youth Camp Committee; Albert 
Graves, chairman. Food and Ra- 
tioning Committee; Mrs. A. A. 
Schumann, chairman. Adult Mo- 
bilization Committee; and Trans- 
portation Committee; C. A. Muel- 
ler, chairman. Publicity Commit- 
tee, C. P. Tanner, chairman. 



Air Cargo Survey Starts Here 

On May 15, Air Cargo, Inc., the 
research organization of 16 air- 
lines, will start a survey in San 
Francisco on possibilities of trans- 
portation of cargo by air. 
• Industries are urged to cooperate 
with the investigators to insure com- 
plete data. 



Published weekly at 333 Pine St., San 
Francisco, Zone 4, County of San 
Francisco, California. Will Williams, 
Editor. Telephone EXbrook 4511. Sub- 
scription, Fifty Cents a Year (Included 
in Annual Dues). 

Application for Second Class Permit 
pending. 



Simplified Application Methods 
Reflected in Form WPB-1319 



San Francisco Ballet 
To Be Presented Soon 

"The Triumph of Hope" and six 
additional ballets, a San Francisco 
enterprise, will be presented at the 
War Memorial Opera House, May 18, 
19, 20, 27, 28, by the San Francisco 
Ballet Guild. 

Thursday's performance will be 
the world premier of the fea- 
tured ballet, by Jean de Botton; 
music by Caesar Franck; chore- 
ography by William Christensen. 



Washington News Flash 



According to a last minute com- 
munication from Frank E. Marsh, 
manager, Chamber's Washington 
Office, seizure of the Montgomery 
Ward plant is the main topic of 
official Washington today. Con- 
gressmen report receiving many 
communications from citizens 
who have never written them be- 
fore. The majority of communi- 
cations are critical of government 
action. 

• NHA, Marsh said, is expected to 
request additional funds for Lanham 
Act program due to increasing needs 
on the West Coast. 

• The Elliott Amendment to 
HR 3961, according to Marsh, is op- 
posed by groups not having the true 
facts. He recommended that addi- 
tional information be disseminated. 



Arrangements to simplify proce- 
dures through the War Production 
Board when business firms seek per- 
mission to buy various items of equip- 
ment are reflected in Form WPB- 
1319, copies of which, with appro- 
priate instructions, may be obtained 
from the Chamber's Industrial De- 
partment. 

The supply has been made avail- 
able through Frank E. Marsh, 
manager, Chamber's Washington 
Office. 

• Under certain WPB orders, busi- 
ness firms are required to secure 
permission to sell, transfer, receive, 
deliver, assemble, produce, manufac- 
ture or fabricate certain equipment. 
Form WPB-1319 provides that a 
number of items may be applied for 
on one form, so long as the items are 
controlled by a single WPB order. 

Some 46 classes of controlled 
items may be applied for, includ- 
ing tank and industrial trucks, 
metal office and industrial furni- 
ture, fluorescent lamps, signal 
equipment, track-laying tractors, 
oil burners, sewing machines, 
new construction machinery, new 
mining equipment, etc. 



New City of Paris Store 

^Announcement of a new $300,000 
City of Paris branch store in San 
Mateo has been made by Paul 
Verdier, president. 
• The new store, called the Penin- 
sula's largest women's style center, 
will open in September. 



The San Francisco Chamber of Commerce 

333 Pino St., San Francisco 4 
EXbrook 4311 




W PUBLISHED BY THE 



Volume I 



W PUBLISHED BY T 

SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 

Thursday, May 18. 1944 



Number 7 




WILBERT WARD 

Observance of National Foreign 
Trade Week by foreign traders 
this year will feature a luncheon 
with Wilbert Ward, vice president, 
The National City Bank of New 
York and 1944 president, Bankers 
Association for Foreign Trade, as 
speaker, in the Gold Room, Fair- 
mont Hotel, May 24. 
• The luncheon is sponsored by 
the Foreign Trade Association of 
the San Francisco Chamber of Com- 
merce in cooperation with the San 
Francisco Chamber, San Francisco 
Junior Chamber, Junior ForeignTrade 
Association, and the Propeller Club. 

"Thoughts for Foreign Trade 
Week" will be Ward's subject. He 
will discuss postwar foreign trade 
prospects, necessary measures to 
maintain a high level of foreign 
trade, Anglo-American postwar 
trade cooperation, international 
currency stabilization, and the 
role of imports. 

"Mr. Ward is an all around 
banker and expert on foreign 
funds, regulations and control. 
His analyses should accomplish 
much in clarification of the prob- 
lems confronting foreign traders, ' ' 
said Arthur B. Poole, president, 
Foreign Trade Association. 



C of C President Folk 
Elected to California 
State Chamber Board 

San Francisco Chamber President 
Adrien J. Falk has been elected to 
membership on the California State 
Chamber of Commerce Board of Di- 
rectors. 

This is the first time that a presi- 
dent of the San Francisco Chamber, 
during his tenure of office, has been 
elected to the State Chamber direc- 
torate. 

Biographical Sketch of Lunch 
aker- Wilbert Ward 



Spe 



Wilbert Ward, graduated by De 
Pauw University, 1910, with degree 
of B.A. ; received, following study of 
law, LL.B. degree from Columbia 
University in 1913. He practiced law 
in New York City, specializing in 
liquidation of insolvent state banking 
institutions. 

Appointed Assistant Cashier, The 
National City Bank of New r York, 
September 7, 1920, he was appointed 
an Assistant Vice President, March 
27, 1923; and on December 23, 1941 
appointed a Vice President. 

Ward is author of recognized stand- 
ing, having published, in 1923, a book 
entitled "American Commercial 
Credits" and in 1931 "Bank Credits 
and Acceptances" which have been 
generally accepted as valuable addi- 
tions to the library of bankingpractice. 

I Am An American Day 

The fifth annual observance of 
American Citizenship Week, May 
15-21, is commended by the San 
Francisco Chamber Board of Direc- 
tors. 

"In recognition of the duty of 
every civic organization and 
agency to give its wholehearted 
support to winning the war and 
preserving the ideals of American 
citizenship, we hereby pledge 
support and urge every citizen of 
San Francisco to join in this 
solemn pledge." 



Mining Committee Plans 
For Fullest Employment 
In Postwar California 

All possible postwar employ- 
ment in the California mining 
industry will be afforded, accord- 
ing to plans having the considera- 
tion of the Mining Committee of 
the San Francisco Chamber of 
Commerce. 

• Long-range plans and policies 
of the Committee will be reflected 
when its representatives appear at a 
hearing in Sacramento on May 23 
before members of the California 
Legislature's Postwar Rehabilitation 
Interim Committee. The special pres- 
entation to be made at Sacramento 
will be handled through Robert M. 
Searls, B. C. Austin. Robert Beale, 
Albert F. Knorp and G. L. Fox, man- 
ager Chamber's Industrial Depart- 
ment, according to George B. Dodge, 
chairman of the Committee. 

Postwar plans for the mining 
industry were considered at the 
last meeting of the Mining Com- 
mittee which was attended by 
General Warren T. Hannum, di- 
rector, State Department of Na- 
tural Resources, four members of 
the State Mining Board, and 
Walter W. Bradley, State Miner- 
alogist. 

• The San Francisco Chamber ad- 
vocates the use and free exchange of 
gold as a monetary standard; a Fed- 
eral metals stockpiling plan; R. F. C. 
loans to gold mining companies to 
tide them through the war period ; and 
continuation of past Federal public 
lands policies w r hich have been favor- 
able to the development of mineral 
deposits. 

Subjects which are having the 
continuing attention of the Com- 
mittee include the completion 
of topographical and geological 
maps for the State of California, 
an economic survey of mining 
possibilities, the foreign sale of 
gold produced in California and 
other subjects. 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Thursday, May 18, 1944 



Oakland Plans for the Future 
Include 4 Area-Wide Surveys 

Four area-wide surveys, all designed 
to provide basic information in Oak- 
land's "Plan for the Future" are 
being conducted by the Oakland Post- 
war Committee and the Oakland 
Chamber of Commerce. 

"Details of the current studies 
to aid manufacturers, labor 
groups, industrial firms of the 
area and retail establishments 
will be published at regular inter- 
vals, when returns have been 
tabulated," said Harold D. Weber, 
general manager. 
• The research surveys include 
Postwar employment estimates, post- 
war labor force, the city-wide "Work- 
Pile" survey and the servicemen's re- 
employment survey. 

The postwar labor survey is being 
carried out by a Bay Regional group 
from the nine Bay Area counties, in- 
cluding the San Francisco and Oak- 
land Cha mbers. 

Remove Restriction on 
War Contracts, Asked 

The Berkeley Chamber of Com- 
merce has issued a renewed appeal 
urging governmental agencies to con- 
tinue the placement of war contracts 
in this area and to remove restrictions 
imposed against awarding of further 
contracts in restrictedCoast laborareas. 

"Unless war contracts continue 
to be awarded or priorities be 
granted for materials for the 
manufacture of civilian goods, in- 
dustrial plants will be without 
work to do and will lose their pres- 
ent labor force," said A. W. Elkin- 
ton, Berkeley Chamber president. 

"Changed requirements of the 
war program bring contracts to 
an end either through completion 
of the work to be done or through 
actual cancellation of the work 
order." He added, "With a loss of 
labor force and lack of materials, 
plants will have to close down." 

Bay Region Improvement In 
Car Unloading Performance 

Walter A. Rohde, manager, San 
Francisco Chamber's Transportation 
Department and chairman, San Fran- 
cisco Car Efficiency Committee, re- 
ports notable improvement through- 
out the Bay Area in car unloading 
performance, with San Francisco, 
however, lagging behind the other 
Bay Area communities in this respecl . 

All receivers of carload freight 
are again urged to unload cars 
promptly. 



Art and Gift Show Set 
By Chamber and Mart 
for Last Week in May 

"For the first time since the 
start of the war, an art and gift 
show will be held in San Fran- 
cisco," Arthur W. Towne, Domes- 
tic Trade Committee Chairman, 
stated in a recommendation to 
the Chamber's Board of Directors 
for approval of an exhibit to be 
sponsored jointly by the Chamber 
and the Western Merchandise 
Mart. 

• The exhibit, which was approved 
by the Chamber Board, will show art 
and gift merchandise ' from every 
state in the Union and many foreign 
countries. 

Merchandise will be on exhibit in 
two adjacent locations — the Mer- 
chandise Mart and the Whitcomb 
Hotel, May 29 through June 1. 

"In planning for this show, 
your Committee is laying the 
foundation for similar semi-an- 
nual showings in San Francisco," 
said Frank K. Runyan, president 
Western Merchandise Mart and 
chairman of the Sub-Committee 
which developed the program 
"which will make this city the 
market center for the West Coast 
for art and gift merchandise." 

• Letters have been sent out to 
chambers of commerce throughout 
Central and Northern California pro- 
viding them with full details of the 
show and suggesting that they assist 
local manufacturers in arranging for 
exhibits in the show. 

San Francisco Businessmen 
Visit Contra Costa County 
For Good Neighbor Meeting 

Members of the Domestic Trade 
Committee yesterday, May 17, vis- 
ited Pittsburg and other points of 
interest in Contra Costa County as 
guests of the Pittsburg Chamber of 
Commerce and Contra Costa County 
Development Association. 

• Trip Chairman for the Committee 
was Frank K. Runyan, President, 
Western Merchandise Mart. 

The visit was highlighted by a 
luncheon at Camp Stoneman, in 
the Camp's main mess hall, fol- 
lowed by a business meeting at 
which time problems of mutual 
interest were discussed. 

During the afternoon, the San 
Francisco group was taken on a per- 
sonally conducted tour of Camp 
Stoneman, arranged by Col. Murray 
H. Ellis, Commanding Officer. 



Sacramento and Visalia 
Thank Chamber for Help 
On Central Valley Issue 

The Sacramento Chamber of Com- 
merce and Yisalia Chamber of Com- 
merce have sent letters of appreciation 
to the San Francisco Chamber for 
supporting the Elliott Amendment to 
the Rivers and Harbors Bill, H. R. 
3961, according to C. P. Tanner, 
manager, Chamber's Agricultural De- 
partment. 

• The Elliott Amendment pro- 
vides exemption from the Reclama- 
tion Act land limitation provisions 
for land located in the Central Valley 
Project. 

Under the Reclamation Act size 
of landholdings that may receive 
water from an irrigation project 
constructed by the Bureau of 
Reclamation are limited, and Sec- 
retary of Interior Harold L. Ickes 
is advocating limiting to 160 acres 
those lands in California which 
may benefit from the Central Val- 
ley Project. 



Chamber Again Urges 
No Unnecessary Trips 

From time to time it is rumored 
that railroad passenger travel is about 
to be placed on a priority system 
somewhat similar to that in effect on 
air travel, according to Chamber's 
Transportation Department. While 
such rumors lack official confirmation 
from the ODT, it is, nevertheless a 
fact that the demands of the Armed 
Forces for passenger space are on the 
increase, and unless additional equip- 
ment can be secured by the railroads, 
this will mean less space for civilians. 

ODT and the railroads maintain 
that there is still a great deal of 
unnecessary travel, also that space 
is still being wasted because of 
failure of purchasers to promptly 
release it when they cancel their 
trips. 

New Western Branch 

San Francisco has been selected 
as western service headquarters by 
Gotham Instrument Company, 
according to the Chamber's In- 
dustrial Department. 

With Walter J. Halpern as general 
manager, the Company has estab- 
lished a repair factory for all types of 
dial and other instruments at 591 
Mission Street where jobs will be af- 
forded for between 15 and 20 men 
permanently. 



Thursday, May 18, 1944 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Tidewater Oil Announces 
Opening Tire Recapping 
Plant Here, Early June 

Tide Water Associated Oil Co. will 
soon start operating a tire recapping 
plant in San Francisco. 

Operations will begin about the 
first of June at 1169 Bryant Street. 
A floor area approaching 10,000 
square feet will be occupied ini- 
tially, but additional space is 
available for expected rapid ex- 
pansion. 

• The plant is being set up to pro- 
vide recapping service for the benefit 
of San Francisco Associated dealers 
and large commercial customers. Since 
retail business will not be accepted, 
the new factory will not compete 
with established retreading shops. 

In charge of the plant as super- 
intendent will be William Ehlert, 
who has many years experience in 
tire reconditioning. 

• Renewing of smooth casings 
will be accomplished with the most 
modern equipment obtainable, a line- 
production technique being used in 
connection with Fisk materials. 

The new factory will be an ad- 
dition to the department headed 
by M. S. Pease, manager of tires, 
batteries and auto supplies, and 
will be under the general super- 
vision of W. A. Reanier, sales 
manager. 

The Bacon Yulcanizer Manufactur- 
ing Co., of Oakland is furnishing the 
equipment. 



Postwar Congress of Industry 
Trade and Finance Planned Here 



Nelson Explains WPB 
Views on Entrance of 
New Firms in Industry 

"Restrictions on new companies 
which want to enter an industry 
for the first time will undoubtedly 
be needed until the now critical 
components and materials are in 
easy supply," Donald M. Nelson, 
chairman, War Production Board, 
said in a recent address at At- 
lanta. 

Continuing, he said in part, "It is 
the view of the WPB that so long as 
wartime controls are retained, ma- 
terials and components should not be 
allocated to these new firms until 
firms already established in the af- 
fected industries, and which are now 
in a position to resume production of 
their former products, have received 
their just allocations ... if an essen- 
tial civilian item is scarce, and if a 
new concern is in a position to make 
it without interference with war pro- 
duction, and if established manu- 
facturers are not in a positioH to re- 
sume production of the item, then in 
the public interest allocations should 
be and will be made to the new 
firm." 



COMPARATIVE STATISTICAL DATA 



Subject: — Estimated Civilian Population (Nov. 1) 1943 By Areas and 
With Ratios. Source: — U. S. Census Bureau Reports, based on War 
Ration Book 4 Registrations. Prepared by: — Industrial Department, 
San Francisco Chamber of Commerce. 

Percentages of 

11 West. 7 West. 3 Pac. 

Area Total U.S. States States States Calif. 

San Francisco County 685,951 0.5 4.6 5.4 6 3 8 7 

5 S. F. Bay Area Counties a) 1.727.369 1.4 11.5 13.6 15.8 219 

6 S. F. Bay Area Counties lb) 1.822.984 1.4 12.2 14.3 16.6 231 

9 S. F. Bay Area Counties Ic) 2.127,117 1.7 14.2 16.7 19 4 270 

11 S. F. Bay Area Counties (d) 2.467,090 1.9 16.5 19.4 22.5 313 

48 No. Calif Counties 3.535.515 2.8 23.6 27.8 32.3 449 

Los Angeles County 3.138,797 2.5 21.0 24.7 28.6 39 8 

10 So. Calif. Counties 4,346,179 3.4 29.0 34.2 39.7 551 

California 7.881,694 6.2 52.6 62.0 71.9 100 

Oregon 1,172,674 .9 7.8 9.2 10.7 

Washington 1,905,239 1.5 12.7 15.0 17.4 

No. Cal, Ore.. Wash 6.613,428 5.2 44.2 52.0 60 3 

Arizona 569,357 .5 3.8 4.5 (5.2) 

New Mexico 490, U 9 .4 3.3 (3.9) (4.5) 

So. Cal., Aril., N. Mei. 5,405,655 4.2 36.1 (42.5) (49 3) 

3 Pacific States 10.959,607 8.6 73.2 86.2 100.0 

7 Western States (e) 12,716.339 10.0 84.9 100.0 

11 Western States if) 14,979,325 11.8 100.0 

Other 37 States 112,328,559 88.2 

United States 127,307,884 100.0 

(a) Alameda. Contra Costa. Marin, San Francisco and San Mateo Counties, (referred to as the San Francisco- 
* i-tklund Industrial Area in Census reports), (bl Alameda. Contra Costa. Marin, San Francisco. San Mateo and 
Solano Counties (referred to as San Francisco-Oakland Metropolitan Counties in Census reports), [c] \<]'i~ 
Xapa. Santa Clara and Sonoma Counties to the preceding group, (d I Adds Sacramento and San Joaquin Counties 
e \rizona, California, Idaho. Nevada. Oregon, Utah. Washington, (f) Arizona. California. Colorado. Idaho 
Montana. Nevada. New Mexico. Oregon. Utah. Washington. Wyoming. 



A postwar Congress of Industry, 
Trade and Finance — San Francisco 
1945, initiated by the San Francisco 
Convention and Tourist Bureau has 
been endorsed by the San Francisco 
Chamber of Commerce on recom- 
mendation of the Foreign Trade As- 
sociation and Foreign Trade Com- 
mittee of the San Francisco Chamber. 

According to the Convention 
and Tourist Bureau plans, the 
Congress is to be held a year or 
two after the close of the war. 

• The proposition contemplates 
bringing to San Francisco during the 
Congress blueprints of foreign con- 
struction projects sponsored by foreign 
private and governmental interests. 
These blueprints would be circulated 
generally among United States en- 
gineering societies, associations of 
industries, investment underwriters 
and foreign traders well in advance of 
the Congress. 

When the Congress is held, the 
various interested groups would 
meet the foreign representatives 
sponsoring foreign projects at the 
Congress, and negotiate con- 
tracts for delivery of materials re- 
quired, for supply of technical 
direction and assistance, and for 
financial underwriting of the pro- 
jects. 

According to the Chamber ap- 
proved recommendation, the idea is 
to arrange now through engineering 
societies and associations representing 
the various industries for participa- 
tion and cooperation in the proposed 
Congress. Cooperation of the United 
States Department of State, other 
Federal departments, and with cor- 
responding societies, associations and 
foreign-government agencies is to be 
secured. 

• It is proposed that the Congress 
would be a continuous series of meet- 
ings extending over a period of per- 
haps nine months, during which time 
various national engineering societies 
and industrial associations and other 
groups would hold in San Francisco 
their annual conventions. 



New Novelty Firm Here 

The Industrial Department an- 
nounces that Simon Ruslander, for- 
merly of Guatemala, has established 
a small factory at 468 McAllister 
Street, San Francisco, to engage in 
the production of a wide variety of 
leather novelties. 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Thursday, May 18, 1944 



DOMESTIC TRADE TIPS 



A digest of correspondence received 
from those desiring, or offering, lines 
of merchandise for representation. 
Inquiries are listed here as a service 
without necessarily bearing endorse- 
ment by the Chamber. For further 
details, contact the Domestic Trade 
Department, EXbrook 4511, Ext. 74. 

D-6008— M. J. SKUBAL COMPANY, 
1567 West Pierce Street, Milwaukee, 4, Wis- 
consin, desires to represent local machinery 
manufacturer in the Wisconsin area. 

D-6009— MARTIN J. RAUSCHER, 5933 
North Leader Ave., Chicago, Illinois, will be 
at the St. Francis Hotel from May 17th to 
May 23rd and wishes to discuss with manu- 
facturers the possibility of representing them 
in the Chicago area. 

D-6010— ARTHUR J. MICHAELS, 366 
Fifth Avenue, New York, wishes to contact 
jewelry and novelty manufacturers seeking 
the services of an Eastern sales representative. 

D-6011— EASTERN SMELTING & RE- 
FINING CORP., 107-109 West Brookline 
Street, Boston, 18, Massachusetts, is inter- 
ested in securing representation in this area. 
Contact M. G. Alperin. 



C of C Congratulated 
on Action Preventing 
Dock Rate Increases 

Thomas R. Speakman, secretary, 
Industrial Traffic Club, San Fran- 
cisco, has sent congratulations on be- 
half of San Francisco Bay shippers to 
the San Francisco Chamber on its 
successful activity in opposition to 
the increases in wharfage and dockage 
rates recently proposed by the Board 
of Harbor Commissioners and Port of 
Oakland. 

In a letter to Chamber Presi- 
dent Adrien J. Falk, Speakman 
said, "The Club particularly de- 
sires to thank Walter Rohde, 
manager, Transportation Depart- 
ment, the Transportation Com- 
mittee, and the Maritime & Har- 
bor Committee of the Chamber 
for their unremitting efforts and 
able presentation of this matter 
before the U. S. Maritime Com- 
mission, leading to decision by 
the proponents to postpone the 
increases indefinitely." 



Published weekly at 333 Pine St., San 
Francisco, Zone 4, County of San 
Francisco, California. Will Williams, 
Editor. Telephone EXbrook 45 11 . Sub- 
scription, Fifty Cents a Year (Included 
in Annual Dues). 

Application for Second Class Permit 
pending. 



Greater Unity Noted 
Between DistrictGroups 
San Francisco C of C 

Thos. J. Lenehan, President of the 
Retail Merchants Association, re- 
ported to the Chamber of Commerce 
Board of Directors that "While con- 
tacting district groups for en- 
dorsement of the Market Street 
Railway purchase, very favorable 
remarks were made regarding the 
work done and the concern shown 
by the Chamber in the past year 
in district problems, bringing 
about a very decided feeling of 
closer relationship between out- 
lying districts and the Cham- 
ber." 



Official War Movies Here 

According to Major Melville H. 
Ruick, Industrial Services Officer, 
Ninth Service Command, the three 
latest official war films as well as a 
number of others are now available at 
Castle Films, Inc., 943 Russ Bldg. 

• For the first 60 days after initial 
release, films can be obtained by em- 
ployee groups in essential industries. 
At the end of that period these films 
become available for chambers of 
commerce, manufacturers' associa- 
tions, American Legion, Veterans of 
Foreign Wars, Rotary Clubs, Kiwanis 
Clubs, Lions Clubs, etc. ; fraternal 
organizations; groups engaged di- 
rectly or indirectly in war work; 
colleges; churches and private or- 
ganizations; high and elementary 
schools. 

The San Francisco Chamber ol Commerce 

333 Pine St., Son FronclKo 4 
EXbrook 43 1 1 



WASHINGTON NOTES 



Although Congress will dispose 
of individual income tax simpli- 
fication bill soon, corporate tax 
simplification will probably have 
to wait. 

• The Treasury Surplus Com- 
modity Disposal Division intends to 
keep surplus goods away from specu- 
lators. 

• Price Control — There is some 
doubt now that price control amend- 
ments will be ready before June 30, 
and temporary extension of the pres- 
ent act by joint resolution may be 
required. 

• Contract termination legislation 
appears to be nearer completion with 
the House proposal carrying a new 
section intended to assure prompt 
payment of contractors and to pro- 
tect the government against overpay- 
ment in settlement of termination 
claims. 

Experts to Survey Assets 
of Santa Clara County 

Santa Clara County's industrial 
campaign will have assistance of spe- 
cialized experts, according to an an- 
nouncement by the San Jose Chamber 
of Commerce and the city of San Jose. 

Subcommittees of experts are 
being appointed, according to the 
announcement, "to prepare fac- 
tual data on such problems as 
buildings and sites, fire insurance 
and transportation rates, taxation 
and assessed valuations, water 
and power," in order to furnish 
industrialists considering loca- 
tions with information. 




^u&we&x. 



PUBLISHED BY THE 

SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 



Volume I 



Thursday, May 25, 1944 



Number 8 




• Manpower requirements in the 
shipyards at Puget Sound, Mare 
Island, Hunters Point, Terminal Is- 
land, and San Diego are causing Navy 
officials considerable concern. 

According to the Navy, there 
has been practically no increase 
in personnel in the Mare Island 
yard since January 1, although 
'approximately nine thousand em- 
ployees have left and nine thou- 
sand new employees have been 
employed. 

The Army, Navy, Maritime Com- 
mission and War Production Board 
are all favorable to the Bailey-Brew- 
ster plan now before Congress, which 
would induct for special military* 
service all draft-exempt males 18 to 
45 who leave jobs in war industry or 
fail to transfer to war industry when 
summoned. 

• Civilian production was given a 
boost recently when Donald Nelson, 
chairman, WPB, announced a policy 
for resumption or increase of pro- 
duction with respect to labor areas, 
designed to assist in meeting the in- 
adequate labor supply problem for 
war production programs, and at the 
same time to provide for increases in 
the production of the most essential 
goods for civilians. 

The policy stipulates: 1. That 
approved production programs be 
placed, as far as possible, in Group 
3 and 4 labor areas; 2. That portions 
of such programs may be put into 
Group 2 labor areas if it can be shown 
that this can be done without inter- 
ference with military' production, upon 
approval of the appropriate vice 
chairman. 3. That resumptions or 
expansions of production may be 
authorized for Group 1 labor areas 
only after clearance and approval by 
the Area Production Urgency Com- 
mittee. Where no such committee 
exists, approval by the executive vice 
chairman is required. 4. That these 
limitations shall not apply to plants 
whose total employment, after the 

(Continued on Page 4) 



Falk Praises Mayor on Success 
of Railway Purchase Proposal 



U. S. as World Banker 
Must Collaborate, Says 
Foreign Trade Speaker 

After World War II, problems will 
be the same in substance as those 
after the first world war — "of secur- 
ity, of trade, of money," according to 
YVilbert Ward, vice president, The 
National City Bank of New York, 
and president. Bankers' Association 
for Foreign Trade, who was speaker 
yesterday at a Luncheon in the Fair- 
mont Hotel, sponsored by the Foreign 
Trade Association of the San Fran- 
cisco Chamber. 

"For the United States to as- 
sume full stature as a world's 
money market, we must create in 
the rest of the world an atmos- 
phere of confidence that our 
money market will operate in an 
atmosphere of responsibility and 
not of opportunism," Ward said. 

"The United States must dem- 
onstrate a cooperative attitude 
toward world problems of postwar 
international collaboration in the 
financial and economic field," he 
said. 

"Only in such an atmosphere 
can we come of age as world 
bankers." 



San Francisco to be Surveyed 
for Types Air Transport Needs 

With the cooperation of the San 
Francisco Chamber, 16 major air 
lines, through the market analysis 
staff of Air Cargo. Inc., are surveying 
San Francisco's possibilities as a pro- 
ducer of air cargo. 

Surveys are being conducted in 
31 cities, including San Francisco 
and Los Angeles, as a basis for 
future operations. 



City approval of the Market 
Street Railway purchase "sym- 
bolizes a new era when San Fran- 
cisco 'gets things done'," said 
Adrien J. Falk, president, San 
Francisco Chamber, at an im- 
promptu ceremony on the steps 
of the City Hall, Wednesday, 
May 17. 

The ceremony was held as a tribute 
to Mayor Lapham in his successful 
campaign for the purchase. Chamber 
of commerce dignitaries, officers and 
members of many other civic and 
trade associations from the neighbor- 
hoods and from downtown marched 
on the City Hall to join in the tribute. 

"This day should be marked for 
all time as one of the great days 
in San Francisco history," Falk 
said. "We can now go forward to 
get other things done for San 
Francisco." 

"We should all pay tribute to the 
fine campaigning done under the lead- 
ership of Chairman Francis Y. Kees- 
ling, Yice-Chairman J. W. Mailliard, 
Jr., Treasurer Walter A. Haas, Cam- 
paign Manager Howard G. Hanvey, 
and all those who worked with them; 
but I know that I speak for all of them 
when I say to you, Mayor Lapham, 
that yesterday's victory is a monu- 
ment to the magnificent one-man 
campaign that you waged so tirelessly 
and effectively. " 



Noble Named to OPA Group 

Weller Noble, vice president and 
treasurer, Pacific Guano Company, 
Berkeley, has been appointed to the 
Fertilizer Industry Advisory Com- 
mittee to confer and cooperate with 
the Office of Price Administration, 
according to word received by the 
Chamber's Industrial Department 
from the Washington Bureau. 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Thursday, May 25, 1944 



Farmer's Free Market Backed 
by Chamber as War Measure 



San Francisco Bay Port 
To Be World's Largest 
Predicts WSA Official 

"San Francisco should become 
the world's largest shipping port," 
said Andrew G. Wilson, Regional 
Director of Recruitment and 
Manning for the War Shipping 
Administration, in a recent an- 
nouncement of manpower needs 
and extent of Victory merchant 
fleet to be used in the "Pacific 
push". 

"We must gel 42,1)00 former sea- 
men to return to the sea this year to 
man the new ships being launched at 
a rate of five a day," Wilson said. 

"We have received authoriza- 
tion to greatly expand our organ- 
ization in San Francisco and the 
Pacific Coast to be ready to handle 
the vast Victory merchant ship 
fleet, now on the Atlantic, which 
will be shifted to the Pacific to 
supply the war against Japan. 

"Successful handling of this huge 
trade will insure San Francisco's fu- 
ture as the largest and most impor- 
tant city on the Pacific Ocean." 

State Commission to Survey 
Postwar Rebuilding Needs of 
Richmond as Example City 

Richmond is now being surveyed by 
the State Reconstruction and Reem- 
ployment Commission as an indus- 
trial boom town to size up types of 
rebuilding needed for postwar read- 
justment. 

It is expected that results of 
this survey will be used by the 
Commission in formulating plans 
to assist in readjustment of other 
California cities facing problems 
similar to Richmond's. 
• The survey will cover special 
types of rebuilding needs such as 
sewers, streets, water mains, etc. 

S. F. Airport Expands 

Construction to cost $2,395,000 
at the San Francisco Municipal 
Airport has been authorized by 
the War Department. 

Bids have been received for the 
fill which is the first step in lengthen- 
ing the NW-SE runway, and other 
improvements will follow shortly. 



The San Francisco Chamber of 
Commerce has gone on record en- 
dorsing as a wartime emergency meas- 
ure the proposed ordinance govern- 
ing the establishment and operation 
of a Farmers' Market in San Fran- 
cisco, to assist in the disposal of 
farm commodities. 

According to the Chamber 
statement, "During the last crop 
season, the free market was able 
to handle some of the surplus 
farm crops. 

"This contribution, together 
with that of the Distress Crops 
Marketing Committee, set up by 
the Chamber last year for the ex- 
press purpose of moving through 
established channels of distribu- 
tion fruits and vegetables declared 
surplus, succeeded in marketing 
a considerable quantity of prod- 
uce which otherwise might have 
rotted in the orchards or on the 
ground. Thus agriculture and the 
nation were rendered a valuable 
service in wartime. 

"Under normal economy, the 
Chamber, which is dedicated to 
the American system of free en- 
terprise, would oppose legislation 
designed to finance, promote or 
otherwise assist any special groups 
or individuals to produce or mar- 
ket products in competition with 
established methods of idoing 
business. The Chamber does not 
consider it the function of gov- 
ernment to favor one method of 
distribution against another. 

"It would be a departure from 
the principle of free enterprise, in 
which farmers and businessmen 
have the same stake, if farmers 
are granted such preferred treat- 
ment from government and, in the 
opinion of the Chamber, farmers 
themselves would generally reject 
it." 

Lundborg to Look Over 
Washington, D.C. Office 

Louis B. Lundborg, general mana- 
ger, San Francisco Chamber, is in 
Washington, D.C. for a brief visit to 
consult with Frank E. Marsh, mana- 
ger. Washington Office, on operations 
of the office and to lay out plans for 
future program of activities. 

While on the East Coast, Lund- 
borg will call on industrialists in 
Eastern cities in reference to pro- 
spective plans for Western expan- 
sion. 



Business Needing Funds 
to Reconvert, May Look 
toRFC,McCulloughSays 

Businesses confronted by financial 
problems, resulting from war demo- 
bilization, contract termination or 
reconversion to civilian production, 
may look to Reconstruction Finance 
Corporation for assistance if their 
needs cannot be met by banks or 
other financial institutions. 

This announcement follows a 
recent conference between John 
F. McCullough, Jr., Manager of 
the San Francisco Loan Agency 
of the Corporation, and repre- 
sentatives of the Chamber. 

• Under McCullough's direction, 

the San Francisco Loan Agency is 
now making a survey to determine 
how R. F. C. can be most helpful to 
business firms in this region in over- 
coming problems created by the ulti- 
mate letdown in war demands. 

Since undertaking the making 
of loans to businesses for the na- 
tional defense effort in 1940 and 
later for the war effort, R. F. C. 
has authorized for these purposes 
almost 10,000 loans and bank par- 
ticipations aggregating almost 
two billion dollars. In addition, 
substantial advances by R. F. C. 
subsidiaries have been made on 
purchase of materials and equip- 
ment. 

• Indicating its interest in small 
business, R. F. C. reports that almost 
9,000 of the authorizations were for 
amounts of $100,000 or less. 

Wherever possible, R. F. C. acts in 
conjunction with banks or other fi- 
nancial institutions, but, when such 
establishments cannot participate, 
R. F. C. is prepared to give sympa- 
thetic attention to requests for loans, 
immediate commitments for future 
loans, or preliminary negotiations 
looking toward future commitments. 

San Francisco R. F. C. offices 
are located at 200 Bush Street, 
Room 800, telephone EXbrook 
5740. 



Increased Manufacturing Ups 
Santa Clara Co. Employment 

Santa Clara County had a gain of 
25 per cent in number of employed 
persons between 1940 and 1943 be- 
cause of expanded manufacturing 
activities there, according to a recent 
announcement by the State Labor 
Commissioner. 



Thursday, May 25, 1944 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Contract Termination Policies Stated 



United Airlines Applies for 
More Direct Service From Here 

United Airlines, in several applica- 
tions to the Civil Aeronautics Board, 
is seeking to establish direct service 
from San Francisco to cities through- 
out the West and to Hawaii and 
Alaska. 

• Latest application was for a new 
direct one-carrier service from a score 
of important cities to Alaska, with 
expedited schedules between those 
cities and the northern territory- 
Flights would place San Fran- 
cisco only T i hours from Juneau 
and 10! 4 hours from Anchorage. 

• United has also applied for 

direct one-carrier service from San 
Francisco and other cities on the 
Main Line to Hawaii, which would 
place Honolulu only 10 hours from 
here. 

• In another application, permis- 
sion was asked to link San Francisco 
with important cities in California, 
Oregon, Washington, and Idaho — 
cities not served today by direct air 
service. 

At the same time United asked 
authority to establish a new route 
between Reno-Boise-Lewiston- 
Spokane, which would provide a 
direct line from San Francisco. 



Chamber Radio Series 
Requested by Stations 
Throughout the Nation 

Requests are coming in from radio 
stations throughout the nation for 
transcriptions of the San Francisco 
Chamber of Commerce radio series, 
OPEN UP THOSE GOLDEN 
GATES! 

This series, devoted to reporting 
on San Francisco and Bay Region 
progress on the "Road Map" to 
Tomorrow— Starting Today, is 
now being presented every Sun- 
day evening from 7 :30 to 7 :45 over 
KJBS. 

• Requests for records of the series 
have come so far from : 
WALL Middletown, New York 
KYEC San Luis Obispo, California 
KIKM Eureka, California 
KYOS Bellingham, Washington 
WGNC Gastonia, North Carolina 
KGLO Mason City, Iowa 
KWOC Poplar Bluff, Missouri 
KMYR Denver, Colorado 
KENO Las Vegas, Nevada 

Each program in this series is 
devoted to one phase of San Fran- 
cisco Bay Region postwar plan- 
ning. 

Participating are leading men in 
each field. 



COMPARATIVE STATISTICAL DATA 



Subject: — Estimated Civilian Population — 1943-1940. Source: — U. S. 
Bureau of Census Reports. Prepared. by: — Industrial Department, 
San Francisco Chamber of Commerce. 

Change 
Apr. 1, 1940 to 
Not. 1. 1943 Apr. 1. 1940 Nov. 1, 1943 

%of 
Area Amount Ratios Amount Ratios Amount Change 

San Francisco County 685,951 .5 630,785 .5 55,166 8.7 

6 S. F. Bay Area Counties (a) .. 1,727,369 1.4 1,400.226 1.1 327,143 23.4 

6 S. F. Bav Area Counties (b). 1.822.984 1.4 1,447.378 1.1 375,606 26.0 

9 S. F. Bay Area Counties tc) 2.127,117 1.7 1,717,234 1.3 409,883 23.9 
11 S. F. Bay Area Counties id). 2.467,090 1.9 2,021,211 1.5 445,879 22.1 

48 No. Calif. Counties 3,535,515 2.8 3,072,633 2.3 462,882 15.1 

Los Angeles County ... 3,138.797 2.5 2.782,998 2.1 355,799 12.8 

10 So. Calif. Counties 4.346.179 3.4 3,795.432 2.9 550,747 14.5 

California 7,881.694 6.2 6,868,065 5.2 1.013,629 14.8 

Oregon 1.172,674 .9 1,088,284 .8 84,390 7.8 

Washington 1,905,239 1.5 1,719,143 1.3 186.096 10.8 

No. Cal.. Ore.. Wash. 6.613.428 S.2 5.880.060 4.5 733,368 12.5 

| Arizona 569,357 .5 497,068 .4 72,289 14.5 

New Mexico 490.119 .4 530.662 .4 -40.543 -7.6 

I So. Cal.. Ariz.. N. Mel. 5,405,655 4.2 4,823,162 3.7 582,493 I2.I 

3 Pacific States 10,959,607 8.6 9,675,492 7.4 1,284.115 13.3 

7 Western States le) . 12,716,339 10.0 11.355.852 8.7 1,360,487 12.0 

11 Western States f . 14,979,325 11.8 13,808.803 10.5 1.170,522 8.5 
Other 37 States 112,328.559 88.2 117,520,301 89.5 -5,191,742 -4.4 
United States 127,307.884 100.0 131.329.104 100.0 -4.021,220 -3.1 

(a)Alameda. Contra Costa. Marin. San Ftancisco and San Mateo Counties, reterred to as the San Francjsco- 
Oakland Industrial Area in Census reports. tbJAlameda. Contra Costa. Marin, San Francisco. San Mateo and 
Solano Counties, reterred to as San Francisco-Oakland Metropolitan Counties in Census reports to Adds Napa. 
Santa Clara and Sonoma Counties to the preceding group, (d) Adds Sacramento and San Joaquin Counties, 
te) Arizona. California. Idaho, Nevada. Oregon, Utah. Washington, If) Arizona. California. Colorado, Idaho, 
Montana, Nevada. New Mexico. Oregon. Utah, Washington. Wyoming. 



A detailed set of policies and pro- 
cedures for inclusion in legislation 
under which terminated contracts will 
be settled have been approved by the 
Board of Directors. 

• Highlights of the Chamber's rei 
ommendations are: 

1. That there be, congressionally 
created, a governmental advisory 
board composed of representatives of 
all war contracting agencies headed 
by a presidential ly appointed chair- 
man, subject to Senate confirmation. 
Board jurisdiction should be confined 
to contract settlement, and its power 
limited to setting uniform policies. 

2. That procedures be devised for 
grouping contracts through over-all 
termination, company by companv. 

3. That the General Accounting 
Office be given no authority over 
claim settlements or audits and its 
jurisdiction confined largely to deter- 
mination of fraud. 

4. That contracting officers not be 
held personally liable for payments 
made. 

5. That settlements be arrived at 
through agreement, or by determina- 
tion of the amount due, or by a com- 
bination of those methods. 

6. That contracting agencies limit 
their review of subcontractors' claims 
as much as possible and be given 
authorization to settle such claims 
directly. 

7. That termination notices be 
given as far in advance as possible and 
that settlement should be final and 
conclusive. 

8. That the machinery' for settling 
disputed claims include provisions for 
mediation or arbitration by a con- 
tracting agency; for the creation of 
an Appeal Board; when litigation is 
necessary, for disputes to be taken 
to the Court of Claims or District 
Courts. 

These recommendations were 
developed by a special committee 
composed of the following: E. L. 
Mathy, chairman, Victor Equip- 
ment Company; E. W. Bullard, 
E. D. Bullard Company; R. F. 
Fraser, Fraser & Johnson; J. A. 
Gruner, Blake, Moffitt & Towne; 
Paul E. Hoover, Anglo California 
National Bank; H. C. McKenna, 
Enterprise Engine & Foundry 
Company. 

Recommeiulatitms closely coincide 
with what is contained in Senate Bill 
1718. 

• Copies of recommendations 
may be obtained from the Domestic 
Trade Department, San Francisco 
Chamber of Commerce. 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Thursday, May 25, 1944 



Amendment to Supreme 
Court Representation 
Selection Proposed 

A bill was recently introduced into 
the House which would amend the 
Judicial Code, with respect to geo- 
graphical representation on the Su- 
preme Court of the United States. 

According to the bill, "At least 
three of the members of the Su- 
preme Court shall be individuals 
appointed from the first zone ..." 
• The first zone is made up of 20 
western states, in which California is 
included. 

Eligibility would be 10 years' 
continuous residence in this zone 
previous to appointment. 

The bill, after introduction in the 
House, was referred to the Committee 
on Judiciary. 



Retailers Start "Third Army" 
and Extensive Campaign for 
Fifth War Loan Drive Here 

Dave Street, managing director of 
the Retail Merchants Association, an- 
nounced a new Retailers' Program in 
the 5th War Loan Drive, which will 
start on June 12th and carry on 
through July 8th. 

National quota is 16 billion dol- 
lars in war bonds, 6 billion dollars 
of which is to be raised directly 
from individuals. 
• Retailers will be relied upon for 
a large percentage of the "E" bonds 
(sold to individuals). 

The Third Army, a newjidea for 
San Francisco retailers, is being 
instituted to further stimulate 
the sale of war bonds. Individual 
quota for retail employees has 
been raised from $200 to $300 in 
this drive. 

All retail store personnel will be 
inducted and advancement will be 
made in rank from private first- 
class, on sale of $25 war bond, up to 
a four-star general, upon completion 
of selling $5,000 in war bonds. 

BACK THE ATTACK 
BUY MORE THAN BEFORE 



Published weekly at 333 Pine St., San 
Francisco, Zone 4, County of San 
Francisco, California. Will Williams, 
Editor. Telephone EXbrook 4511. Sub- 
scription, Fifty Cents a Year (Included 
in Annual Dues). 

Application for Second Class Permit 
pending. 




Here is a chart which outlines a 
plan developed by Admiral H. E. 
Yarnell to unify the Army and Navy 
under a single Department of war: 




plan developed by Admiral H. E. Yamell to un 
■my and Navy under a single Department of War. T 
Corps would continue as part of the sea forces and I 

Navy sttU would have an air arm 



Washington Notes 

(Continued from Page 1) 
proposed production increases have 
been effected, will not exceed (a) 50 
persons, in the critical West Coast 
labor areas of San Diego, Los An- 
geles, San Francisco, Portland and 
Seattle, and (b) 100 persons else- 
where in the United States. 

• A Digest of the Functions of the 
Federal Agencies is available without 
charge through the facilities of the 
Washington Office of the San Fran- 
cisco Chamber upon telephone re- 
quest to EXbrook 4511, local 56. 



The San Francisco Chamber of Commerce 

333 Pine St., San Francisco 4 
EXbrook 4311 



Oakland and Berkeley 
Join in Celebration of 
Foreign Trade Week 

Widespread San Francisco Bay 
Region interest in World Trade is 
exemplified in National Foreign Trade 
Week celebrations of Oakland and 
Berkeley. 

• Oakland's annual World Trade 
Luncheon, sponsored by the Oakland 
Rotary Club and World Trade Com- 
mittee of the Oakland Chamber, will 
be held today at the Hotel Leaming- 
ton. Guest speaker is Dr. Erico Veris- 
simo, Brazilian novelist. 

• Berkeley's Foreign Trade Week 
Luncheon, held Tuesday, May 23, at 
Hotel Shattuck, featured T. K. Sun, 
vice consul of China. Sponsors were 
the Berkeley Chamber and Berkeley 
Kiwanis. 

Tomorrow, Friday, May 26, the 
Oakland Foreign Trade and Har- 
bor Club will hold an Interna- 
tional Banquet and Dance at 
Hotel Leamington. 

Berkeley Chamber President A. W. j 
Elkinton recently announced as evi- 1 
dence of Berkeley's interest in trade 
development matters, approval of res- 
olutions urging elimination of inter- 
state trade barriers, modernization of 
the Webb Export Trade Act, and : 
commendation of San Francisco's pro- 
posed World Trade Center. 



"The Cardinal's Portrait" 

The first quality print in this! 
country of THE CARDINAL'S 
PORTRAIT, by Toby E. Rosenthal,! 
has just been produced by Crockerl 
Union, lithographers. 




'Su4we44. 



PUBLISHED BY THE 

SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 



Volume 1 



Thursday, June 1, 1944 



Number 9 



Business Activity Edition 



Vol. 15, No. 4 of Business Activity Series 



Thumb Nail Sketch 

The Research Department 

San Francisco Chamber 

of Commerce 

• The Bay Area population reser- 
voir on April 1, 1944, was remarkably 
near the same level as on November 1, 
1943. five months earlier, according to 
the official census reports for these 
dates. Presumably, the number of 
inductions and voluntary outbound 
migrants has been about equalled by 
the number of inbound migrants. 

Currently, however, there is re- 
ported a shortage of about 27,500 
workers in critical war industries, 
indicating that Bay Area activity 
is operating at near capacity for 
the manpower available. Ship- 
building, ship repair ng, and ship- 
ping activities' manpower needs 
are greatest. 

• Local housing centers indicate 

a steady flow of requests for housing, 
but only a small per cent can be 
placed under existing regulations. The 
importance of the "civilian backstop" 
to the Bay Area war economy and his 
housing needs have not received any- 
official recognition, although promi- 
nent groups in the Bay Area initiated 
a movement to gain official approval 
for a private building program pri- 
vately financed as a practical ap- 
proach to the housing shortage which 
is handicapping the labor supply. 

• Contracts — Bay Region cumula- 
tive war supply and facility contracts 
and project orders reported by the 
War Production Board through 
the March-February period totaled 
$4,452,934,000 and represented a net 
gain of Sill, 190,000 over the cumu- 
lative through February-January fig- 
ure. Unclassified supply contracts ac- 
counted for S37, 616,000 out of the 
March total of $41,887,000. The 
supply contracts through March to- 



taled S2.984, 174,000. Military and 
industrial facilities contracts in Feb- 
ruary rose $10,388,000, carrying 
the cumulative through February to 
$654, 182,000. 

• April employment in manufac- 
turing industries in the San Francisco 
Industrial Area amounting to 254,600 
was 1.9 per cent below March and 5.6 
per cent below April last year. 

The non-durable group em- 
ploying 49,600 in April chalked up 
an increase of 2,100 persons over 
March in contrast to the 7,100 
drop in the durable group in re- 
lation to the preceding month. 
The non-durable group also 
showed a slight increase over April 
last year. 

• April manufacturing payrolls 

were up 1.3 per cent above last April 
but 1.2 per cent below March. Total 
payrolls during the first four months 
were up 7.4 per cent above the same 
period last year. Average weekly 
earnings in April amounted to S60.ll 
compared to S59.64 in March and 
$56.31 last April. Average hourly 
earnings amounted to $1,327 com- 
pared to $1,268 last April. Average 
hours worked per week in April 




J FMAM J J ASOND 



amounted to 45.3 compared to 45.0 
in March and 44.4 last April. 

• April financial transactions in 

the Bay Region measured by bank 
debits amounted to S1.946, 153,000 
and represented an increase of 1.2 per 
cent over last April. The four months' 
cumulative was up 16 per cent. 

• Freight movements based on car- 
loadings in the San Francisco-Oak- 
land Switching Limits during April 
amounting to 66,181 cars were 4.3 per 
cent above last April. The four 
months' cumulative of 259,306 cars 
was up 9.6 per cent, or nearly 23,000 
cars over the same period last year. 

• Bay Region department store 
sales in April were up 2 per cent over 
last April with the four months' cumu- 
lative up 6 per cent. These gains were 
identical to those reported for the 
Twelfth Federal Reserve District. 
Central Valley sales were up 8 per 
cent with Fresno topping the gains at 
26 per cent, followed by Bakersfield 
at 12 per cent, Stockton 4 per cent, 
and Sacramento 3 per cent. Sales in 
the Los Angeles area were up 5 per 
cent and were similar to the gain for 
the State. Sales in Seattle were off 
3 per cent and in Portland 9 per cent 
compared to last April. 

Trade at wholesale during the 
first quarter on the Pacific Coast 
compared to the first quarter last 
year was up 4 per cent. Automo- 
tive supplies led all groups with 
an increase of 37 per cent. Metal 
sales rose 14 per cent. Groceries 
and food rose 11 per cent. Leather 
and shoe findings rose 12 per cent. 
Contrasting these gains, the larg- 
est drops were reported in the 
building material, electrical sup- 
ply, and shoe and footwear groups 
ranging between 13 and 15 per 
cent. 

(Continued on Page 4) 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Thursday, June 1, 1944 



Contract Termination 
Instruction Form Is 
In Chamber Bulletin 

• Attention of members is directed 
to the instruction program poll form 
on the last page of the Contract Ter- 
mination Bulletin, sent to the mem- 
bership soon. 

All of the procurement agen- 
cies, both through their national 
and local offices, are particularly 
anxious to provide full oppor- 
tunity to contractors, subcon- 
tractors, suppliers, and related 
services, such as accountants, to 
become as informed as possible on 
policies and procedures involved 
in the settlement of cancelled 
contracts. 

The instruction program will be 
as practical and informative as it 
is possible to plan it, and it is 
the Chamber's recommendation 
that all those who may be affected 
by contract terminations should 
take advantage of the proffered 
instruction program and let the 
Chamber know, by returning the 
form, how deeply they want to go 
into the subject. 

Lundborg Meets With 
Salt Lake City Leaders 

En route east, Louis B. Lundborg, 
general manager, San Francisco Cham- 
ber, visited Salt Lake City to discuss 
plans for cooperative western devel- 
opment with Gus P. Backman, Salt 
Lake City Chamber Executive Sec- 
retary, and other Salt Lake City busi- 
ness leaders. 

"We on the Pacific Coast have 
come to realize that the future of 
San Francisco is closely linked 
with Utah's future and we are 
vitally interested in what's going 
on up here and look forward to the 
opportunity to cooperate closely 
with you in the further develop- 
ment of your resources," Lund- 
borg said to Salt Lakers. 

"We hope to purchase a great 
many things Utah is producing. 
Among others, we will need a 
great amount of steel products, 
and many Utah-grown agricul- 
tural products. After the war, 
with San Francisco as the gate- 
way, the West will have a big 
market for its products in the 
Orient. 

"Both San Francisco and Salt 
Lake City will need each other 
after the war. The Western States 
have grown up industrially." 



San Francisco as 
Ranks Nation's 



Training Program Here 
Increases Production 

Thanks to the program of an agency 
known as "Training Within In- 
dustry," plant production records 
throughout the San Francisco Bay 
Area have shown astonishing in- 
creases recently, according to the 
Chamber's Industrial Department. 

National average production 
increase shown by firms using the 
agency's program is 48%, but 
many plants in this area have 
shown greater increases. 

• Foremen and Supervisors receiv- 
ing job instructor training to date 
number 11,855; those obtaining in- 
struction in job methods amount to 
5519, while the number trained in job 
relations stands at 12,356. 

• Two Plans — The office of "Train- 
ing Within Industry" in this district, 
located at 260 California Street, em- 
ploys two plans. One comprises bring- 
ing men from different firms to attend 
an institute in San Francisco. At that 
institute in the course of six days of 
intensive study, the men acquire 
knowledge which they impart to 
other foremen and supervisors in 
their factories on return. 

The other method, used in 
smaller plants, involves the bor- 
rowing of an institute-trained 
man from one company to lend 
him to another for purposes of 
training the latter's personnel. 



Sacramento C of C Announces 
Results of Postwar Job Survey 

Postwar surveys and prepara- 
tions by the Sacramento Chamber 
of Commerce show that at least 
3,264 more workers will be em- 
ployed there after the war than 
in 1940, according to Harold Blanc, 
Postwar Executive. 
• A group of 250 firms plan im- 
provements estimated at $3,670,605, 
and 52 of these firms plan definitely 
to build warehouses, stores, and new 
plants as soon as possible. 

The Sacramento Chamber's 
postwar program also comprises 
veterans' reemployment and re- 
orientation, completion of the 
Central Valley Project, promotion 
of the ship channel project, and 
others. 



Banking Center 
Second Largest 

San Francisco is the nation's 
second largest financial center, 
based on a study of the 1943 de- 
posits of the 100 largest commer- 
cial banks conducted by the 
Chamber's Research Department. 

• Seven of the banks in San Fran- 
cisco, including the Bank of America, 
American Trust Company, Wells 
Fargo Bank, Anglo California Na- 
tional Bank, Crocker First National 
Bank, Bank of California, and San 
Francisco Bank (order according to 
bank deposits), rank among the first 
100 banks of the nation with total 
deposits amounting to S5, 598, 187,000, 
or 10.1 percent of the total deposits. 
Only New York exceeded this figure. 

Among the first ten banking 
centers following San Francisco in 
order were Chicago, Detroit, Bos- 
ton, Philadelphia, Los Angeles, 
Cleveland, Pittsburgh, and St. 
Louis. 

• During the past year the West 
Coast section continued to lead other 
sections of the nation in bank de- 
posit gains, reflecting the great in- 
dustrial expansion taking place in 
this section of the nation. 

The study further revealed that 
the Bank of America, N.T. & S.A. 
of San Francisco made a spec- 
tacular gain of $912,000,000 in de- 
posits during the year 1943, carry- 
ing its total deposits to $3,498,- 
153,210, jumping it from fourth 
into third place among the na- 
tion's largest banks. 

• The study revealed that the 

Bank of America has also another 
distinction, ranking highest among 
the first ten banks of the nation in 
ratio of deposits to capital, which 
amounted to 24.1 times; the First 
National Bank of Chicago was sec- 
ond with 19.4 times, while the na- 
tion's largest, the Chase National 
Bank, showed a ratio of 16.0 times. 

The expeditious handling of fi- 
nancial transactions of all kinds 
has helped to maintain sound in- 
dustrial and trade relations be- 
tween San Francisco and the 
western regional markets. 



New United Airlines Office 

To relieve congestion due to capac- 
ity wartime traffic, United Air Lines 
has opened a second San Francisco 
traffic office, located in the lobby of 
the Palace Hotel. 



Thursday, June 1, 1944 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



SURVEY OF BUSINESS CONDITIONS 
IN SAN FRANCISCO 



BRANCH OF ACTIVITY 



Residential, New . I number) 

(value) 

Single-family Dwellings. New number) 



Non-residential, New- 
Additions 
Installati 



value 

(number) 

) value I 
Alterations 5; Repairs (number) 



(value 

(number) 

(value) 



Mortgages & Deeds of Trust , 

Releases (number) 

(amount 
RETAIL DEPARTMENT STORE SALES 

San Francisco ..(Index) 

FINANCE 

Bank Debits 

Bank Clearings 

Postal Receipts 

S. F. Stock Exchange. 



COMMERCIAL FAILURES 

Liabilities 



Payrolls (manufacturing) (Index) 

NON-MFG. INDUSTRIES (5 Co.'s) (a) (Index) 

Laundering, Cleaning, Dyeing (Payroll) 

Wholesale Trade (Payroll) 

Retail Trade... ... (Payroll 

Hotels (Payroll) 

PLACEMENTS IN SAN FRANCISCO— U. S. E. S. 

Industrial Placements (nu 

Commercial Placements (nu 

TRANSPORTATION 

Carloads . ■ . (nu 

S. F. Airport Traffic (no. p 

(no. passengers 
Express Shipments— Rail (number) 



i r 



UTILITIES & NEW DEVELOPMENTS 

El?c. Energy Sales Index (k.w.hrs.) 

Indus. & Com'l Gas Sales (ci 

Water Consumers (net gain) 

Tourist & Settler Inquiries (number) 

DAIRY RECEIPTS, FRUITS & VEGETABLES 



LIVESTOCK SLAUGHTER (b) (total num 

Cattle (num 

Calves (num 

Sheep S: Lambs, (nun; 

Hogs (nun: 

S. F. LIVING COSTS 1935-39 Avg. = J00 

Food (Index) 

Clothing. (Index) 

Rent (Index 

Fuel and Light. . (Index) 

House Furnishing Goods. i Index) 

Miscellaneous (Index 

All Items (Index 



8.S10 

1.055 
10.349,678 

1.134 
7,541.26" 

1.196 
7.859,161 

158 



1.465.893 
1.150.588 
2.701.231 
381.504 
6.539.364 



10.361 
9.248 
1.113 



30.904 
1.380 
15,258 

285. 583 



1.031.011.700 



3.275.894 
961,134 
131.440 

2,058.313 
1.570 

211.225 
31.181 
13.380 

111.268 
55.396 



142.2 
135.0 
106.0 
92.6 
121.1 
127.8 
128.1 



4,951.172 

1,060 

5.152.857 



1,361.968 

593,464 

8.121,471 



151.7 
128.7 
129.7 
149.1 



30,329 
1.202 
14,173 

262.305 

7,000 

321.410 



1,277.926 

111.366 

530,755 

1.628 

178.243 
22.080 
3.902 

106.802 
45.459 



149.7 
128.1 
106.0 
92.2 
119.0 
122.4 
128.5 



-11.4 
11.7 
-50.6 
-48.9 
-35.7 
22.9 
20.7 
274.2 
293.3 
155.6 

30.1 
84.2 
18.5 
52.3 
12.8 
52.5 



98.3 
-35.7 
-19.5 



32.6 
42.8 
-16.7 



-44.1 
-24.8 
18.0 
287.8 



18.5 
41.2 
242.9 



39.361.918 
4.316 

30,117.627 
4,835 

32,809.598 

157 



6.321,085 
4.675.707 

11.402.328 
1,964.499 

29,983,109 



150.8 
140.6 
128.6 
174.2 

43.040 
39.162 
4,425 



122.727 

5.481 

59.880 

1.130.068 

29.586 

2,436.830 



,1.350,845,100 



10.300.722 

3.586.910 

541,003 

8.870.202 

6.754 

769,469 
125,044 
128.986 
353,326 
262.113 



142.4 
134.1 
106.1 
92.4 
120.9 
125.9 
127.5 



5.165 

2.737 
20.057.163 

2.932 
17,438.705 

4.184 
23.692.659 

150 



5.425,611 
4.068.546 
4.624.529 
2,037,955 
26.475,055 



149.5 
127.5 
126.6 
145.7 

38,800 
32.613 
6.187 



53.290 
1.040.181 

27,556 
1,145.810 



3,846,799.600 



15.466.107 

5,651,937 

444,589 

7.018.959 

6.641 



11.428 
329,122 
189.152 



143.6 
126.9 
105.0 
92.7 
119.0 
120.8 
125.9 



(a) These data are based on reports submitted to the Division of Labor Statis 



nd Law Enforcement. State of Californi; 



(b) Federal Inspection — San Francisco District 

Acknowledgment is hereby made to Thomas Magee & Sons, Dun St Bradstreet, Inc.. local utilities, private organizations. Federal 
Reserve Bank of San Francisco, California State Departments of Industrial Relations. Agriculture, and Employment, and the United 
States Departments of Labor. Agriculture, and Commerce, and the United States Bureau of the Census, for the basic data each con- 
tributed toward this survey compiled by the Research Department. San Francisco Chamber of Co: 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Thursday, June 1, 1944 



Projects for Postwar 
Period Exhibited Here, 
City of Paris Window 

A series of postwar planning visual- 
izations are now being exhibited in 
the Geary Street display window of 
the City of Paris Department Store 
in cooperation with the San Fran- 
cisco Chamber of Commerce. 

• The exhibits will change weekly 
and run for a total of ten weeks. 

First exhibit will feature the 
contemplated underground Mar- 
ket Street development. 

• Also exhibited will be : San 
Francisco Shoreline Development, 
Ferry Building Modernization, San 
Francisco Airport, Trans-Pacific Air 
Base, Golden Gate International Air- 
port, San Francisco El Way, World 
Trade Center, San Francisco Produce 
Market, and the Candlestick Cove 
Housing Development. 

Business Activity 

(Continued from Page 1) 

• General business activity in San 

Francisco in April measured by our 
Index at 171.1 settled seasonally com- 
pared to the March level. April busi- 
ness was 10.5 per cent below the 
preceding month, but 3.1 per cent 
above last April. Activity during the 
first four months was 13.2 per cent 
above last year. 

Placements during April in San 
Francisco totaled 10,361 persons of 
which 9,248 were industrial and 
1,113 commercial. This is a slight 
gain over the total March place- 
ments and an increase of 32.6 per 
cent over April last year with the 
four months' cumulative up 11 
per cent. 

• April living costs represented by 
the index for San Francisco-Oakland 
at 128.1 were up 0.5 per cent above 
March, but were 0.3 percent under 
April last year. Food costs showed 
a 5.0% drop compared to last year, 
while clothing costs rose 5.4 per cent. 
Living costs average for the first four 
months was up 1.3 per cent above the 
same period last year, but food costs 
were off 0.8 per cent while clothing 
costs rose 5.7 per cent. 



Published weekly at 333 Pine St., San 
Francisco, Zone 4, County of San 
Francisco, California. Will Williams, 
Editor. Telephone EXbrook 4511. Sub- 
scription, Fifty Cents a Year (Included 
in Annual Dues). 

Entered as Second-Class matter April 
20, 1944, at the Post Office at San 
Francisco, California, under the act of 
March 3, 1870. 



Postwar Mining Needs Aired at 
California Legislature Hearing 



Stressing the importance of gold 
to the economy of California and 
opportunities for postwar employ- 
ment in this state, representa- 
tives of the Mining Committee of 
the San Francisco Chamber of 
Commerce appeared before the 
Postwar Rehabilitation Interim 
Committee of the California Leg- 
islature at Sacramento last week. 

Assemblyman T. Fenton Knight, 
Los Angeles, presided at the Hearing 
with the cooperation of Rolland A. 
Vandergrift, Legislative Auditor. 
Other members of the Committee are 
Assemblymen Charles M. Weber, 
Stockton; C. L. Guthrie, Tulare; and 
J. F. Thompson, Santa Clara. 

• Those testifying before the Com- 
mittee in behalf of the San Francisco 
Chamber included Robert Beale, at- 
torney, who represented a group of 
mining companies; B. C. Austin, who 
also represented mining groups; Al- 
bert F. Knorp, secretary, California 
Chapter of the American Mining 
Congress; and G. L. Fox, manager, 
Chamber's Industrial Department. 
Other members of the Committee 



who testified included Worthen Brad- 
ley, president, California Chapter, 
American Mining Congress; Walter 
A. Stalder, oil and gas geologist; 
W. W. Mein, Jr., secretary, State 
Mining Board; H. A. Sawin, in behalf 
of the placer dredging industry; and 
Phil R.Bradley, Jr. .president, Mother 
Lode Mining Association and chair- 
man, State Mining Board. 
• Presentations — With a view to 
possible official state endorsement of 
objectives sought, subjects covered by 
the presentations included: (1) Use 
and free exchange of gold as a mone- 
tary standard; (2) Relief for gold 
mining industry within the frame- 
work of WPB order L-208; (3) Loans 
by the Reconstruction Finance Cor- 
poration to gold mining companies to 
enable them to carry through the war 
period ; (4) The stock piling of strate- 
gic minerals and metals; (5) Federal 
Public Lands policies; (6) Suggestion 
that a reasonable liberality be shown 
by the Legislature in supporting the 
budget submitted by the State Di- 
vision of Mines, as approved by the 
Director of Finance and the Director 
of Natural Resources. 



House Passes Chamber Urged 
Repeal of LandGrantRailRates 

The House of Representatives last 
week passed HR 4184, to repeal land 
grant rail rates. 

For several years, the San Fran- 
cisco Chamber has urged repeal 
on the grounds that land grant 
rates are discriminatory and a 
source of confusion. 

The San Francisco Chamber of Commerce 

333 Pine St., San Francisco 4 
EXbrook 4 5 1 1 



Backman, Salt Lake City, Here 

Gus P. Backman, executive secre- 
tary, Salt Lake City Chamber of 
Commerce, in San Francisco for a 
brief visit, has been invited to meet 
with the Chamber's Board of Direc- 
tors today. 

Ways in which San Francisco 
may work with Salt Lake City for 
future Western industrial expan- 
sion will be discussed. 




W PUBLISHED BY THE 



W PUBLISHED BY T 

SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 



Volume 



Thursday, June 8, 1944 



Number 10 



WASHINGTON NOTES 



• "Stay on the job" is the appeal 
made by Charles E. Wilson, executive 
vice president. War Production Board, 
who has declared that there is no im- 
mediate prospect of substantial cut- 
backs in war goods output. Wilson's 
statement was prompted by reports 
of a growing "restlessness" among 
war workers. 

• Flood Control. Congressman 
Tom Rolph and James H. Turner, 
manager and chief engineer, Hetch 
Hetchy Water Supply, Power and 
Utilities Engineering Bureau, testified 
before a sub-committee of the Senate 
Commerce Committee in connection 
with H. R. 4485, the Omnibus Flood 
Control Bill. 

Rolph stated to the committee 
that San Francisco is willing and 
anxious to cooperate with the 
Chief of Army Engineers in the 
Federal flood control program and 
that there was no excuse for a 
third agency to be injected into 
the program as it affected San 
Francisco. 

• Sales made to a so-called agent of 
a foreign buyer are no longer to be 
considered as export sales and eligible 
for an export premium, even though 
the agent discloses that he takes title 
on behalf of a foreign buyer. This 
action became effective June 5. 

• The quota of new passenger 
cars available for rationing during 
June reflects the shortest supply of 
automobiles since the beginning of 
the war, according to the OPA. 

The quota for Region 8, which 
includes California, Nevada, Ore- 
gon, Washington, and the north- 
ern part of Idaho, is 1,305 (out of 
a total of 9,000 cars for the nation) 
and a reserve of 340. 

• Special gasoline rations will be 
available to office workers, business- 
men, housewives, and others who 
volunteer for spare-time labor on 
farms and in food processing plants 
this summer. 



Bowes, Planning Head, 
Leaves Chamber Staff 
To Enter Marine Corps 

Eugene G. Bowes, who has been 
with the San Francisco Chamber 
for a year and one half as director 
of postwar planning, has been 
commissioned Second Lieutenant 
in the U. S. Marine Corps Re- 
serve, and is leaving San Francisco 
for Marine Air Forces Ground 
School at Quantico, Virginia. 

"Bowes has been an active force 
behind the preparation and pro- 
motion of the Chamber's famous 
'Work Pile' plan and 'Road 
Map' to a Greater San Fran- 
cisco," said Louis B. Lundborg, 
general manager. 

"In his work as Chamber staff rep- 
resentative at the City Hall and, as 
secretary to several major commit- 
tees, Bowes has made a real contribu- 
tion to the Chamber's progress in the 
last year and he will be missed both 
by the staff and by the others with 
whom he has worked." 
• He handled arrangements for 
exhibits of postwar projects displayed 
at the White House and a similar 10 
week exhibit now showing at the City 
of Paris. 



Backman Urges West 
Cooperate for Postwar 

Gus P. Backman, executive secre- 
tary, Salt Lake City Chamber of 
Commerce, while in San Francisco, 
met with members of the San Fran- 
cisco Chamber's Domestic Trade 
Committee at an informal luncheon 
at the Commercial Club arranged by 
Arthur Towne, chairman of the Com- 
mittee. 

"We want to ship our raw ma- 
terials to you, with initial stages 
of processing performed, for you 
to finish into the completed prod- 
uct," Backman said while here. 



Dedication Ceremonies 
Held at Moffett Field 
For Ames Laboratory 

Dedication ceremonies for Ames 
Aeronautical Research Laboratory at 
Moffett Feld will be held today at 
the Field, with the National Advisory 
Committee for Aeronautics out from 
Washington, D. C. to officiate. 

• Featured in the ceremony will 
be a new full scale wind tunnel cap- 
able of testing planes with an 80 foot 
wing spread. 

• The day's events will include 
a luncheon at the field and inspection 
of facilities. 

The San Francisco Chamber of 
Commerce, which was instru- 
mental in the original purchase 
of Moffett Field and location of 
the Laboratory there, will be re- 
presented. 

• This is the first time the National 
Advisory Committee has visited its 
facilities at Ames Laboratory, which 
now represents a 820,000,000 invest- 
ment. 

Chamber Manager Returns 
from Washington Conference 

"San Francisco Bay Region is 
receiving increasing recognition 
in Washington and industrial 
centers throughout the East," 
said Louis B. Lundborg, general 
manager, San Francisco Cham- 
ber, who has just returned from 
Washington, D. C. 

• While in Washington, Lundborg 
met with Congressmen and officials of 
government agencies to present a 
clear-cut picture of San Francisco 
Bay Region conditions and develop- 
ments and to obtain policy informa- 
tion from these agencies. 

Lundborg also laid plans with 
Frank E. Marsh, manager, Wash- 
ington Office, for future operation 
of the office. 



Luncheon Announcement Inside — See Page 3 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Thursday, June 8, 1944 



Major Realties Appointed to Chamber Staff 



Small Manufacturers Sought 
by U.S. Maritime Commission 

"The Small Business Section of 
the United States Maritime Com- 
mission of Oakland, California, is 
anxious to locate more plants in 
the eleven western states which 
are capable and interested in the 
manufacturing of products for 
the shipbuilding industries," ac- 
cording to a letter received by the 
San Francisco Chamber's Indus- 
trial Department. 
•The Department has supplied 
the Small Business Section of the U. S. 
Maritime Commission Procurement 
Division in the Financial Center 
Building, Oakland, with a directory 
of firms who have machinery, tools 
and equipment to manufacture or 
fabricate metal products such as iron 
or steel foundries, machine shops, 
sheet metal shops, steel fabricating 
shops, forging shops, etc. 

If you are engaged in any of 
these lines and have not had Mari- 
time Commission work, it is sug- 
gested that you address a letter 
immediately to Allen S. White, 
Regional Chief, Small Business 
Section, Procurement Division, 
United States Maritime Commis- 
sion, Financial Center Building, 
Oakland, California, advising him 
fully as to the quality and quan- 
tity and kinds of work which your 
plant can do. 



Naval Affairs Group 
Visits Treasure Island 

The Bay Region Naval Affairs Com- 
mittee, consisting of representatives 
from chambers of commerce through- 
out the Bay Area, inspected United 
States Navy installations, and Pan- 
American World Airways facilities at 
Treasure Island, Tuesday, June 6. 

A luncheon was provided by the 
San Francisco Chamber. 
• Naval Officers from Bay Region 
naval establishments visited earlier 
by the committee were honored guests 
at the luncheon. 

Naval Affairs Committee mem- 
bers representing the San Fran- 
cisco, Vallejo, Oakland, San Jose, 
Alameda, and San Mateo cham- 
bers of commerce and the Contra 
Costa Development Association 
were present. 



Eastern Industry Plans 
Expansion West, Says 
Oakland C of C Man 

"The Pacific Coast and espe- 
cially the Oakland and San Fran- 
cisco Bay Areas will remain one 
of the Nation's industrial 'white 
spots' in the postwar era," an- 
nounced the Oakland Chamber of 
Commerce on the report of E. H. 
Hammond, manager of the Indus- 
trial Department, just returned 
from a trip east. 

While east, Hammond made over 
100 industrial calls. 
• Hammond reports that not only 
is there a definite interest in the Pa- 
cific Coast, but the majority of indi- 
cations are that areas of the Bay 
Region are considered most desirable 
locations for postwar expansion. 

"Paramount in the minds of 
eastern and industrial manufac- 
turing leaders are the following 
reasons for contemplating Pacific 
Coast and San Francisco Bay Area 
expansion," Hammond said. 

( 1 ) Greatly expanded domestic mar- 
kets in the West. 

(2) Anticipation of large export 
markets to the Orient. 

(3) Contemplation of further ex- 
pansion to protect markets already 
established. 

(4) Greater manufacturing facili- 
ties in the San Francisco Bay Area 
and availability of raw materials. 

(5) Accessibility of low-cost elec- 
tric power and natural gas. 

(6) Vast reservoir of skilled and 
semi-skilled workers in this area. 

(7) Central location of transporta- 
tion advantages. 



Ceremony Held at Friant Dam 
for Dedication, Madera Canal 

Dedication ceremonies for the 
Madera Canal Unit of the Central 
Valley Project of the U. S. Bureau 
of Reclamation were held Sunday, 
June 4, at Friant Dam, according 
to Craig Cunningham, secretary, 
Madera County Chamber of Com- 
merce. 

• The ceremony, sponsored by the 
Madera County Chamber, commemo- 
rated the initial diversion of water 
from the Friant Reservoir into the 
Madera Canal for delivery to lands 
of Madera Irrigation District. 



Major Virgil E. Reames, (retired 
U. S. Army) has been appointed 
controller and office manager and 
will takeover "Work Pile", "Road 
Map" and Committee For Econo- 
mic Development activities for 
the San Francisco Chamber, an- 
nounced Louis B. Lundborg, 
general manager. 

• Major Reames was formerly 
PublicRelations officer forCampCook, 
director of personnel, and special 
services officer there. He has also 
worked with the Army Exchange 
Service. 

Major Reames has also had many 
years experience in newspaper and 
radio work in Kansas City, Missouri, 
and Denver, Colorado. 

• Replaces Lambert. Major 
Reames replaces Jack Lambert, 
former controller and office manager, 
for the Chamber, who is retiring to 
his ranch in Warm Springs, California. 

"Lambert has been with the 
Chamber since April, 1941, and 
has done a fine job for our organ- 
ization," Lundborg said. "We are 
fortunate to have in Major 
Reames, a worthy successor to 
him." 



Art and Gift Show Here 
Termed a Great Success 

"Buyers from the eleven West- 
ern States attended the Art and 
Gift Show sponsored by the San 
Francisco Chamber of Commerce 
and Western Merchandise Mart, 
and it was gratifying to see the 
degree of interest shown by these 
buyers in San Francisco's ex- 
hibit," said Arthur Towne, chair- 
man, San Francisco Chamber 
Domestic Trade Committee, fol- 
lowing an inspection tour of the 
exhibits. 

• The Western Art and Gift Show, 

the first and only large show for Fall 
and Holiday buying on the Pacific 
Coast, was held at the Merchandise 
Mart and Whitcomb Hotel last week. 



"Road Map" Exhibit Changes 

San Francisco's Ferry Building 
Modernization plan will be exhib- 
ited in the Geary Street display 
window of the City of Paris store, 
for a week starting June 10. 



Thursday, June 8, 1944 BAY REGION BUSINESS 



A TIMELY and URGENT MESSAGE 

from 

Maj. Gen. FREDERICK GILBREATH 

Commanding General. San Francisco Port of Embarkation 

on 

WAR AND LOGISTICS 

PLEASE DISREGARD 



CANCELLED DUE TO 

LAST MINUTE 
CHANGE OF ORDERS 



At Luncheon in 

The San Franciscc 



SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 
333 Pine Street, San Francisco,JCalifornia 

Please reserve place(s) for me at $1.50 each at 

luncheon honoring Maj. Gen. Frederick Gilbreath on Thursday, /" ntTimPrri^l f^lllH 

June 22, in the San Francisco Commercial Club, at 12 noon. 

(Kindly enclose self-addressed envelope for forwarding tickets.) Thursday Noon, June 22, 1944 

Price $1.50 per plate 
Name { $1.46 plus 4c tax) 



Firm. 



Iheck 

; n I j R.S.V.P. Members will be taken care of t< 

' ciosea Address the limit of capacity and as received, but i 

will be to your advantage to make reserva 
tions early before ticket sales axe opened ti 
the general public. 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Thursday, June 8, 1944 



DOMESTICTRADETIPS 



A digest of correspondence received 
from those desiring or offering lines 
of merchandise for representation. In- 
quiries are listed here as a service 
without necessarily bearing endorse- 
ment of the Chamber. For further 
details, contact the Domestic Trade 
Department, EXbrook4511, Ext. 74. 

D-6012— H. A. LOFLIN, 2222 Coventry 
Road, Shaker Heights, Ohio. Connected with 
reputable steel mill and willing to leave to get 
connected with satisfactory Western Line. 
References. 

D-6013— H. B. EICHHORN, 2028 The 
Alameda, San Jose, California, wishes contact 
with manufacturer of automatic stroppers 
for standard double-edge safety razor blades. 
Object: Production. 

D-6014— PAT BRANNAN, WESTERN 
MANUFACTURERS ASSOCIATED, 615 
Insurance Building, Denver, 2, Colorado, is 
interested in handling electrical and allied 
lines in the Rocky Mountain Territory. 

D-6015— W. R. CHESLEY, 643 Jay Street, 
Colusa, California, wishes to^represent in his 
area, San Francisco 6rms. 

Livermore Rodeo Will 
Be Held June 10 and 11 

A "Wild West" Rodeo will be held 
at Livermore, Saturday and Sunday, 
June 10 and 11, according to an an- 
nouncement by the Livermore Cham- 
ber of Commerce. 

"The Livermore Rodeo will af- 
ford the Naval aviation trainees 
at the adjacent U. S. Naval Air 
Station an opportunity to observe 
and enjoy the feats of daring and 
skill which have long been and 
still are an integral part of the 
tradition and spirit of the West," 
said Dr. Leslie Herrick, general 
manager, Livermore Rodeo Ass'n., 
"as many of them are new to 
the Western part of the United 
States." 

Street in Sacramento 

David P. Street, staff executive, 
San Francisco Chamber of Commerce, 
is now in Sacramento at the State 
Capitol, as representative of the 
Chamber during the Special Session 
of the Legislature which opened Mon- 
day, June 5. 



Published weekly at 333 Pine St., San 
Francisco, Zone 4, County of San 
Francisco, California. Will Williams, 
Editor. Telephone EXbrook 45 1 1 . Sub- 
scription, Fifty Cents a Year (Included 
in Annual Dues). 

Entered as Second-Class matter April 
26, 1944, at the Post Office at San 
Francisco, California, under the act of 
March 3, 1870. 



Youth Harvest Camps 
Established for City's 
High School Boys, Girls 

A boys' camp at Livingston, spon- 
sored by the Livingston Community 
Farm Labor Committee, and a girls' 
camp at Sunnyvale, sponsored by the 
American Women's Voluntary Serv- 
ices, have just been established for 
volunteer Food Front Fighters of 
high school age, according to Edson 
Abel, chairman, San Francisco War- 
time Harvest Council. 

The Livingston Boy's Camp will 
run from August 5 to September 
10; the Sunnyvale girls' camp, 
from July 1 to September 2, for 
harvesting Livingston peaches and 
grapes and processing Sunny- 
vale apricots. 

• In charge of recruiting is Mrs. 
Fleta McCoy, USES, 1690 Mission 
Street. 

Alameda Times-Star 
Annual Edition Out 

A special 30-page edition of the 
Alameda Times-Star has just been 
published. Two of the three sections 
are devoted to postwar planning and 
community war developments. 

"America at War" Mural 

"America at War," a mural 

painted by Jean de Botton, featuring 
Henry J. Kaiser's war industries on 
the Pacific Coast, was officially un- 
veiled at the Palace of the Legion of 
Honor, Monday, June 5. Paul Yer- 
dier, president, City of Paris, and one 
of the Trustees of the Legion of 
Honor, made the presentation. 



Applicants for Position 
In Bay Area Concerns 
Listed by C of C Dep't 

Any Bay Area employers who 
would be interested in having 
further information concerning 
the following applicants for jobs 
may obtain it by addressing or 
calling the San Francisco Cham- 
ber's Industrial Department, EX- 
brook 4511. 

• Case No. 1: — Graduate chemist 
interested in product development or 
postwar market analysis; War and 
Navy Department experience; age, 41 
years. 

• Case No. 2: — Former Director of 
Music in a state college; authority on 
"Music in Industry"; War Depart- 
ment experience; seeks opportunity 
to use music to produce greater work 
efficiency; age 57 years. 

• Case No. 3: — B. S. in Business 
Administration with broad experience 
in administrative organization and 
personnel management; honorable 
discharge and draft exempt; age, 30 
years. 



American Airlines Presents 

"Air Globe" to S.F. Chamber 

American Airlines, Inc., has pre- 
sented the World Trade Department 
of the San Francisco Chamber of 
Commerce with a new type of world 
map— the Air Globe, which exemplifies 
the freedom from boundaries charac- 
teristic of air travel. 



The San Francisco Chamber of Commerce 



333 Pine St., Son Fr 
EXbrook 4S11 



r J PUBLISHED BY THE 

SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 



Volume 



Thursday, June 15, 1944 



Number 11 



Western Crown Cork and Seal Co. 
Announces San Francisco Factory 



WASHINGTON NOTES 



- Washington, Special to S. F. C. 
of C, June 15. — The Emergency 
Price Control Act will undoubt- 
edly contain certain clarifying 
amendments when finally passed 
by congress. Too many business- 
men have been forced to contend 
with administrative decisions 
made by officials unaware of the 
problems involved. 

• Advertising has been given a 
boost in the June issue of Domestic 
Commerce issued by the Department 
o. Commerce. Assistance to the war 
effort by War Advertising Council 
and Pacific Advertising Association 
has done a great deal to make val ue and 
importance of advertising understood. 

• OPA and WPB have announced 
shoe rationing will continue until 
there is marked improvement in 
supply situation. 

• West Coast congressmen met 
recently with members of the small 
business committee of the house. The 
small business committee members 
have made definite recommendations 
to Vinson and Byrnes for change in 
present procurement policies which 
would insure Bay Region firms the 
right to bid if approval could be 
secured from the Area Production 
Urgency Committee. The possibility 
of the proposed change being adopted 
appears promising. 

• The War Manpower Commis- 
sion is investigating reports that cer- 
tain areas on the West Coast have 
not been adhering to the forty-eight 

I hour week. 

• Bay Region Firms having open 
capacity for either military or civilian 
production should advise procurement 
agencies in Washington through reg- 
ular channels. 



Contract Termination 
Procedure Clarified in 
Domestic Trade Bulletin 

Because of the serious effects 
which sudden termination of war 
contracts will have on the entire 
chain of prime and subcontrac- 
tors and suppliers all members 
of the San Francisco Chamber 
in any way identified with war 
work are urged to give careful 
attention to the Chamber bul- 
letin on "CONTRACT TERMI- 
NATION— Summary of Pro- 
cedure." 

• There are two main reasons 
for this bulletin: (1) To inform war 
contractors of the scope, nature and 
general procedures concerned in con- 
tract termination and settlement so 
that they can evaluate their own 
operation and plan accordingly; and 
(2) To offer an opportunity to receive 
more detailed information from local 
procurement agency officers with 
whom San Francisco businessmen 
will deal. 



City of Paris Window Shows 
New Postwar Plan Projects 

The future San Francisco Airport 
will be displayed in the Geary Street 
window of the City of Paris, between 
Saturday, June 17, and Friday, June 
23, through the cooperation of the 
San Francisco Chamber. 

This project, sponsored by the 
Public Utilities Commission, is 
part of the city's Master Plan, 
and is designed to provide a great 
terminal port for land and sea 
planes. 



Western Crown Cork & Seal 
Corporation has just concluded 
arrangements to purchase a 33- 
acre factory site on the Bayshore 
Boulevard for a substantial ex- 
pansion of its Pacific Coast opera- 
tions, subject to securing permits 
for necessary spur track facilities. 

• If arrangements are completed 

for the railroad service, Western 
Crown Cork & Seal Corporation pro- 
poses to build a crown bottle cap 
and closure manufacturing plant on 
the w'est side of Bayshore Boulevard 
between Sunnydale and MacDonald 
avenues. 

It is expected that construction 
of the new facilities will com- 
mence after the conclusion of the 
war, when necessary materials are 
available and that the ultimate 
investment in improvements will 
be a substantial factor in the 
postwar era. 

• The Corporation is a wholly- 
owned subsidiary of Crown Cork & 
Seal Company, Inc., Baltimore, Md., 
the latter company being the world's 
largest manufacturer of closures for 
glass containers and the foremost 
manufacturer of filling and crowning 
equipment for use by the beer and 
soft drink industries. 

"This is great news for San Fran- 
cisco," said Chamber President Adrien 
J. Falk. "Decision of the Crown Cork 
& Seal executives to expand their 
operations in San Francisco reflects 
recognition of San Francisco's supe- 
rior characteristics as a location for 
factories to serve the greatly expanded 
western market." 

"The San Francisco Chamber 
of Commerce has been exceed- 
ingly helpful in negotiations per- 
taining to this project and we are 
hopeful that no undue delays will 
be encountered in working out 
final details," Gowans declared. 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



"Good Neighbor" Visit Paid to 
Richmond by Chamber Group 



State Acts Against 
Chamber-Opposed 
Federal Measures 

California's State Legislature 
recently took action against two 
Federal measures to which the 
San Francisco Chamber has re- 
corded opposition, in accordance 
with recommendations of its 
Agricultural Committee. 

• Water Treaty with Mexico — The 
legislature has appropriated $50,000 
to the Colorado River Board for use 
in opposing a treaty with Mexico in 
which a substantial share of Colorado 
River waters would be diverted for 
use in Mexico. 

Opposition to ratification of 
this treaty was registered by the 
Senate Water Resources Com- 
mittee. 

• Centra) Valley Land Limita- 
tion — The State Senate requested 
that Congress enact legislation ex- 
empting lands receiving waters from 
the Central Valley Project from the 
Federal Reclamation Law 160-acre 
limitation. 

The Chamber recorded opposition 
to water provisions of the proposed 
treaty with Mexico, March 30, 1944, 
and to the Central Vallev land limi- 
tation, April M\, 1944. 



SJVAC0S Holds Regular 
Organization Meeting 

The San Joaquin Valley Association 
of Commercial Organization Secre- 
taries ("SJVACOS") met Friday, 
June 9, at the Hotel Californian, 
Fresno. 

• Emory Gay Hoffman, president, 
presided at the meeting. 

• John Rooks, president, Cali- 
fornia Association of Commercial 
Organization Managers, addressed the 
group on the subject of "Aims and 
Objectives" of the State Association. 

• Latest results of the Cotton Tex- 
tile Industry Survey were reported. 

• A Round-table discussion on 
postwar planning and industrial de- 
velopment was also held. 

C. P. Tanner, manager, San 
Francisco Chamber's Domestic 
Trade Department and secretary, 
CANCACS, attended the Fresno 
meeting. 



A "good neighbor visit" was 
paid yesterday by members of 
the San Francisco Chamber of 
Commerce Board of Directors 
and Domestic Trade Committee 
to Richmond. 

• As guests of the Richmond Cham- 
ber of Commerce and Richmond Ship- 
yard No. 3, the San Francisco group 
lunched with directors of the Rich- 
mond Chamber and officials of Rich- 
mond Shipyards in the Officers' Din- 
ing Room of the Richmond yard. 

E. W. Dale, president, Rich- 
mond Chamber, and Norris Nash, 
Director of Public Relations, Rich- 
mond Shipyards, and Richmond 
Chamber Director, were joint 
hosts. C. P. Bedford, general 
manager, Richmond Shipyards, 
addressed the group. 

Following a brief discussion period 
for the purpose of talking over prob- 
lems common both to Richmond and 
San Francisco, San Francisco Domes- 
tic Trade members were conducted 
on a tour of Richmond Shipyard, 
No. 3. 

Union Square Kick-Off 
Made For 5th War Loan 

The Fifth War Loan Drive was 
launched in San Francisco, Monday, 
June 12, with ceremonies in Union 
Square. 

• The "Third Army" composed of 
the bond-selling emplovees of the 
city's retail stores marched into the 
square and were "sworn in" by Lt. 
General Delos C. Emmons, Com- 
manding General, Western Defense 
Command. 

• Featured speakers for the day 
included Mayor Roger Lapham; W. 
W. Crocker, chairman, Northern Cali- 
fornia War Finance Committee; 
Nadeau L. Bourgeault, chairman, Re- 
tail Division, Northern California; 
and Vincent Compagno, chairman, 
San Francisco War Finance Com- 
mittee, who was master of ceremonies. 

Military bands and a strictly 
military parade highlighted the 
"kick-off" for the Fifth War Loan 
Drive. 

Robinson to Head State Cof C 

Harrison S. Robinson, prominent 
Oakland attorney and businessman 
and past president of the Oakland 
Chamber of Commerce, has been 
elected president of the California 
States Chamber of Commerce. 



Thursday, June 15, 1944 

WFA Provides Help 
to Industries Through 
In-Plant Feeding Here 

Because of its interest in the pro- 
ductive efficiency of war plant workers 
in this area, the San Francisco Cham- 
ber of Commerce Industrial Depart- 
ment invites attention to the Indus- 
trial Feeding Program being carried 
on in this area by the Industrial 
Feeding Programs Division, War 
Food Administration. 

• Objectives — Briefly, the objectives 
of the program are: (1) Installation, 
expansion, and improvement of in- 
dustrial feeding facilities to provide 
food for workers in all plants where 
industrial feeding is practicable. (2) 
Provision of food needed to maintain 
highest efficiency in production. (3) 
Provision of assistance and advice 
to management and workers to assure 
best possible use of available foods. 

' 'When a company desires assist- 
ance with any phase of in-plant 
feeding," said Wesley A. Carter, 
chief, Civilian Food Requirements 
Division for the Western Region, 
"it should address a letter request- 
ing such assistance to Charles A. 
Smith, Regional Director, West- 
ern Region, Office of Distribution, 
821 Market Street, San Francisco. 

"One of our specialists then 
goes to the company property and 
makes a survey and detailed study 
of the needs of that company. 
Thereafter, the data are analyzed 
and form a basis of comprehen- 
sive recommendations which are 
submitted to management. 

"We make available a specialist 
to work with contractors and 
equipment companies so that 
final detailed plans and equip- 
ment requirements will be within 
the limitations imposed by the 
national policy of conservation of 
critical materials and operating 
manpower. Such a procedure per- 
mits this office to make recom- 
mendations for priorities to the 
War Production Board and elimi- 
nate delays. 

"Assistance is also given with 
food ration allotment problems, 
actual operating phases, food sup- 
ply and other related problems." 



Back the Invasion! 
BUY WAR BONDS 



Thursday, June 15, 1944 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



NFTC Bulletin Reports 
Shipping Mail Regula- 
tions For Shippers 

A copv of the National Foreign 
Trade Council Bulletin No. 981 
on Censorship and International 
Communications Restrictions is 
now in the hands of the San 
Francisco Chamber of Commerce 
World Trade Department. 

This bulletin supplements NFTC 
Bulletins Nos. 945, 957. 964, and 971. 

Information and suggestions 
for guidance of steamship com- 
panies and shippers in connec- 
tion with handling of shipping 
mail are contained in these bul- 
letins. 

• Bulletin No. 981 points out the 
importance of marking on the out- 
side covers containing shipping docu- 
ments with SHIPPING DOCU- 
MENTS ONLY. It also points out 
a restriction on execution dating of 
outgoing bills of lading. Phraseology 
such as "first part of May," etc.. 
should be used. Except on bills of 
lading and on the draft, all other ship- 
ping documents may contain ex- 
ecution dates. 

For further information of cable 
confirmations, shipping informa- 
tion not permitted in the mails, 
shipping information permitted 
only on appropriate authority, 
and shipping information per- 
mitted in the mails, call EXbrook 
4511, Ext. 52. 



Ballard Aircraft 
Locates Western 

San Jose C of C Salutes ! 
Women in War Effort 

A Salute to Women in the War 
Effort" show was held recently by 
the San Jose Chamber of Commerce. 

The show drew a crowd of sev- 
eral thousand persons to see ex- 
hibits of women's military and 
civilian units and to witness the 
program. 

"Women are marching and 
working shoulder to shoulder with 
men in this war, but to date had 
received no formal recognition," 
said Russell E. Pettit, general 
manager of the San Jose Chamber. 



Three OPA Appointments 
of Bay Area Men Announced 

Office of Price Administration 
releases announce the following 
appointments: 

A. W. Larrison of D. N. & E. 
Walter Co., San Francisco, and E. J. 
Ziock, General Interiors Consolidated, 
Oakland, to the Venetian Blind Manu- 
facturers Industry Advisory Com- 
mittee; 

E. E. Huddleson. Santa Cruz Pack- 
ing Committee, Oakland, to the 
Frozen Fruits and Vegetables Packers 
Industry Advisory Committee. 



COMPARATIVE STATISTICAL DATA 



Subject: Population Trends — 1920 to 1943 by Areas. Source: — U. S. 
Census Bureau Reports. Prepared by: — Industrial Department, San 
Francisco Cham ber of Commerce. 

1 2 3 ~ 4 ~ 5 6 7 

Civilian Population (Est.) Total Population 

Nov. 1, 1943 1940 1940 1930 1920 

Amount Ratios Ratios Ratios Ratios Ratios 

San Francisco County S 685.951 .5 .5 .5 .5 .5 

5 S. F. Bay Area Counties a 1.727.369 1.4 1.1 1.1 1.0 .9 

6 S. F. Bay Area Counties b 1,822,984 1.4 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.0 

9 S. F. Bay Area Counties c 2,127,117 1.7 1.3 1.3 1.3 1.1 
11 S. F. Bav Area Counties d 2.467.090 1.9 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.3 

48 No. Calif. Counties 3,535,515 2.8 2.3 2.4 2.2 1.9 

Los Angeles County . . 3.138.797 2.5 2.1 2.1 1.8 .9 

10 So. Calif. Counties 4.346.179 3.4 2.9 2.9 2.5 1.3 

California 7.881.694 6.2 5.2 5.3 1.6 3.2 

Oregon 1.172.674 .9 .8 .8 .8 .7 

Washington 1,905.239 1.5 1.3 1.3 1.3 1.3 

No. Calif. , Ore.. Wash. 6.613.428 5.2 4.5 4.5 4.2 3.9 

Arizona 569.357 .5 .4 .4 .4 .3 

New Mexico 490.119 .4 .4 .4 .3 .3 

So. Cidif.. Ariz.. N. Met. 5.405.655 4.2 3.7 3.7 3.2 2.0 

3 Pacific States 10,959.607 8.6 7.4 7.4 6.7 5.3 

7 Western States e 12,716,339 10.0 8.7 8.7 7.9 6.5 

1 1 Western States (f) . 14,979,325 11.8 10.5 10.5 9.7 8.4 
Other 37 States 112,328.559 88.2 89.5 89.5 90.3 91.6 
United States 127,307.884 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 

a) Alameda. Contra Costa, Marin, San Francisco and San Mateo Counties, referred to as the 
I San Francisco-Oakland Industrial Area in Census reports, b Alameda, Contra Costa. Marin. San 
I Francisco. San Mateo and Solano Counties, referred to as San Francisco-Oakland Metropolitan Coun- 
ties in Census reports, c Adds Napa, Santa Clara and Sonoma Counties to the preceding group. 
| being parts of the area constituting an economic entity frequently meant when the term ""San 
i Francisco Bay Area." is used, d Adds Sacramento and San Joaquin Counties, e i Arizona, California. 
! Idaho. Nevada. Oregon, ttah. Washington, f Arizona, California, Colorado, Idaho. Montana. 
Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, I tali. Washington, Wyoming. 



Co., Inc. 
Office Here 

"Because San Francisco is the 
natural center of business for the 
Western States," the Ballard Air- 
craft Co., Inc. of New York is 
establishing western headquarters 
in the Hobart Building, accord- 
ing to a report made to the San 
Francisco Chamber Industrial 
Department by E. H. Bridgman, 
District Manager. 

• Ballard Aircraft Co., Inc. is en- 
gaged in the manufacture of arming 
training replicas and aircraft compo- 
nents and has established the western 
headquarters for sales and service 
work with a view to the postwar 
period. 

• This company is affiliated with 
the Walter M. Ballard Company ot 
New York, interior designers and 
engineers, who are the nation's largest 
buyers of furniture and carpeting 
and who have designed and created 
the interiors of some of the nation's 
largest hotels and offices. 

Ballard Aircraft Co., Inc. now 
operates factories at Elkhart, 
Indiana and Arthurdale, Virginia. 
Establishment of western head- 
quarters in San Francisco should 
provide a foundation for ultimate 
factory development in this area, 
according to the Industrial De- 
partment. 

San Joaquin County 
Produces Record Crop 

San Joaquin County, of which 
Stockton is the county seat, harvested 
an all-time record of SI 10, 113,416 
worth of commercial farm crops, live 
stock and dairy products in 1943 and 
thus further secured its standing as 
one of the top agricultural counties 
in the United States, according to 
Russell F. Bjorn, Secretary-Manager, 
Stockton Chamber of Commerce. 

Growing 54 major commercial 
crops, the greatest number of any 
county in the nation, San Joaquin 
County alone produced more food- 
stuffs to help support the war 
effort than several of the 48 states. 

• The county topped all others 
in the production of canning tomatoes, 
Tokay and wine grapes, sweet cher- 
ries, asparagus, celery, and red kid- 
ney seed beans, among others. 

Of San Joaquin County's total 
of 902,400 acres, 499,332, or more 
than one-half, are under cultiva- 
tion. The county has a normal 
crop-growing season of 287 days 
out of the year. 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Thursday, June 15, 1944 



DOMESTIC TRADETIPS 



A digest of correspondence received 
from those desiring or offering lines 
of merchandise for representation. 
Inquiries are listed here as a service 
without necessarily bearing endorse- 
ment of the Chamber. For further 
details, contact the Domestic Trade 
Department, EXbrook 4511, Ext. 74. 
D-6016— SLIPIT PRODUCTS, INC., 1313 
West Randolph Street, Chicago, Illinois, 
desire a local distributor for their friction 
eliminator, "Slipit." 

D-6017— GEORGE C. GUIBERT, GEN- 
ERAL MANAGER, SUPER CONCRETE 
EMULSIONS, LTD., 1372 East 15th Street, 
Los Angeles, California, wishes to represent, 
in Southern California, local company manu- 
facturing construction or maintenance spe- 
cialties. 

D-6018 \Y. T. SNEDDEN, MANUFAC- 
TURING ENGINEERING SERVICE, 1898 
Crenshaw Boulevard. Los Angeles, 6, Cali- 
fornia, is interested in representing firms in 
sale of products used by machine shops and 
manufacturing concerns in the Southern 
California Area. 

D-6019— HOWARD S. NEVIN, AXLE 
EQUIPMENT SALES COMPANY. 405 
Citizens Bank Building, Corner Marengo & 
Colorado Streets, Pasadena, 1, California, is 
desirous of establishing a dealer in San 
Francisco for Grico Two Axle Drive. 

D-6020— B. C. MATTHEWS, SUN-E- 
SOUTH, 2112 Cherry Street, Philadelphia, 
Pa., wants food producers to contact him 
regarding sales prosposition. Sells through 
jobbers. 

D-6021 — PAUL GUTSCHOW, 434 East 
52nd Street, New York, 22, wishes to act as 
eastern and foreign representative for pro- 
ducers of chemicals, drugs, and related raw 
materials. 

D-6022— FRANKLIN K. SCHIENER, 
GETZOFF-SCHIENER DISTRIBUTORS, 
Two Rector Street, New York, 6, wishes to 
contact canners and producers of food prod- 
ucts for the purpose of distributing same 
along the Atlantic Coast. 



Music Festivals Held 
In Sigmund Stern Grove 

A series of 15 midsummer music 
festivals will be presented free-of- 
charge each Sunday at 2:00 p.m. 
at Sigmund Stern Grove. 

Last Sunday's festival was "Car- 
nival in San Francisco" — the first of 
the series. 



Published weekly at 333 Pine St., San 
Francisco, Zone 4, County of San 
Francisco, California. Will Williams, 
Editor. Telephone EXbrook 45 1 1 . Sub- 
scription, Fifty Cents a Year (Included 
in Annual Dues). 

Entered as Second-Class matter April 
26, 1944, at the Post Office at San 
Francisco, California, under the act of 
March 3, 1870. 



Sonoma Rodeo Set 
For Sunday, June 25 

Observing its sixteenth annual 
roundup, Sonoma Valley is making 
extensive preparations for the color- 
ful Sonoma Rodeo at the Jack Mil- 
lerick Ranch on Sunday, June 25. 

Thousands of war workers from 
nearby ship building plants are ex- 
pected to find relaxation and enter- 
tainment in a full program of Old 
West frontier and cattle ranch shows. 



Road Officials Tour 
Redwood Highways 

Members of the California High- 
way Commission and State Depart- 
ment of Public Works engineering 
staff made a three-day field inspec- 
tion trip of state highways in the 
southern counties of the Redwood 
Empire from June 9 to 12. 

Arranged as part of the Redwood 
Empire Association highway program, 
the tour covered those sections of 
state highways on which improve- 
ments have been requested in San 
Francisco, Marin, Sonoma, Napa, 
Lake and Mendocino Counties in 
order to give these officials a per- 
sonal view of their needs. 




Barcelona Sample Fair 
Shows Exhibit of U. S. 
Life and Industries 

The Sample Fair in Barcelona, an 
annual event to encourage trade 
within the Spanish provinces and 
between Spain and other countries, 
opened June 10 with a United States 
Government exhibit as one of its 
most prominent features, according 
to an announcement from the Office 
of War Information. 
• The American exhibit, prepared 
by the overseas Branch of the OWI, 
was designed to give the people of 
Spain a simple, graphic picture of 
America. 

The panel at the entrance to the 
65-foot square American exhibit sets 
the keynote of the official U. S. atti- 
tude in an introductory message 
beginning: "We, the people of the 
United States, welcome you to 
our exhibit. We present to you 
briefly the way we live and work 
and play, the farms we till and 
the things we make . . ." 



Washington Office 
Found Highly Useful 

"We feel that the maintenance 
of a Washington Office by the 
San Francisco Chamber is a step 
both useful and necessary for the 
clarification of San Francisco's 
problems in connection with the 
Federal Government," wrote R. 
H. Crummey, secretary, San 
Francisco Hotel Association. 



The San Francisco Chamber of Commerce 

333 Pine St., San Francisco, 4 
EXbrook 4311 




* W PUBLISHED BY THE 

SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 



Volume I 



Thursday, June 22, 1944 



Number 12 



WASHINGTON NOTES 



• Contract Controls — Charles E. 
Wilson, Executive Vice-Chairman of 
the War Production Board, states 
that, in close cooperation with the 
local and national representatives of 
the War Manpower Commission, the 
following steps have been taken, which 
he believes will aid in improving the 
distribution of production on the 
West Coast: 

(1) The setting of effective employ- 
ment ceilings of some of the larger 
prime contractors. 

(2) The establishment of produc- 
tion redistribution subcommittees of 
the APUC to redistribute production 
from plants which are behind schedule 
or which have huge backlogs to other 
plants, generally the smaller ones, 
which have open capacity. 

(3) The Appointment of Smaller 
War Plants Corporation and Office of 
Civilian Requirements representatives 
to all Area Production Urgency Com- 
mittees. 

(4) The issuance of WPB General 
Administrative Order 2-154, outlining 
the policy for the resumption or ex- 
pansion of production, which con- 
tains a basic exemption for small 
plants. 

(5) In addition the Production 
Executive Committee, through the 
Procurement Services, has made 
strong recommendations to the Pro- 
curement Agencies and their prime 
contractors, to continue effective sub- 
contracting. 

• Retail Regulation— The Retail 
Council of the OPA, composed of 
representative large and small re- 
tailers of all types from all parts of the 
country, met with OPA officials re- 
cently in an endeavor to develop de- 
tails of a proposed simplified price 
regulation to apply to almost all retail 
stores except food stores. 

The OPA said it was willing to con- 
sider the use of the mark-ups which 
retailers used in some selected base 
period, on the condition that retailers 
could show that such a plan would not 
increase prices to consumers. 
(Continued on Page 4) 



San Francisco Birthday Lunch 
To Be Held Thursday, June 29 



Your CHAMBER of COMMERCE 

RESEARCH 
DEPARTMENT 

It Gets the Facts for Business 



EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the first in a series 
of outlines on the services of the Chamber's 
departments to be included in Bay Region 
Business from time to time. 

These are available for your use at 
any time. 

Publications 

1. Monthly Survey of Business Con- 
ditions in San Francisco. 

2. Annual Economic Survey on San 
Francisco and the Bay Area. 

Reference Data 

1. Filed data on economic facts. 

2. Directories of key cities. 

3. Accurate current data on nearly 
1,000 local and regional business, 
civic, social organizations. 

4. Business Reference Library. 

5. Literature and maps on San Fran- 
cisco. 

6. Census Tract Information. 

Research Facilities 

1. Compilation of special lists. 

2. Special surveys on current matters 
affecting business welfare of com- 
munity. 

3. Background studies supplementing 
activities of other Chamber de- 
partments and committees. 

4. Preparation of graphs, charts, sta- 
tistical tabulations. 

5. Preparation of snecial maps re- 
lating to economic subjects. 



The 168th anniversary of San Fran- 
cisco's founding will be celebrated 
with a Birthday Luncheon in the Con- 
cert Room of the Palace Hotel, Thurs- 
day, June 29, open to every San Fran- 
ciscan desiring to attend. 

• Guest of honor and speaker will 
be Dr. Herbert Eugene Bolton, Uni- 
versity of California, who is an au- 
thority on the history of the American 
Southwest. Chairman of the day will 
be Leland W. Cutler, past president of 
the San Francisco Chamber. 

• The birthday celebration is spon- 
sored by the Citizens' Committee re- 
cently appointed by Mayor Lapham. 
The luncheon will be held under the 
sponsorship of this committee in co- 
operation with the San Francisco 
Chamber of Commerce and other in- 
terested organizations. 

"It is fitting that the 168th 
anniversary of San Francisco's 
founding should be recognized in 
spite of war with some commem- 
oration of the traditions which 
symbolize the growth and char- 
acter of our city," said San Fran- 
cisco Chamber President Adrien J. 
Falk. 

(Continued on Page 4) 



New Penney's Store in S. F. 
Is Largest in National Chain 

Opening of the new J. C. Penney 
Company department store on Mar- 
ket Street, Thursday, June 15, marked 
the establishment in San Francisco of 
the largest of the company's line of 
stores throughout the nation. 

"The opening of this large, well- 
equipped department store to 
serve San Francisco is indicative 
of the company's confidence in 
the future of this city," com- 
mented Louis B. Lundborg, gen- 
eral manager, San Francisco 
Chamber of Commerce. 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Thursday, June 22, 1944 



Northern California Mercury 
Producers Make New Records 



Bill to Prevent Delay 
On Trolley Deal Passed 

The State Assembly and Senate 
have voted approval of a bill designed 
to facilitate completion of the pur- 
chase of the Market Street Railway 
by the San Francisco Municipal 
Government. 

• The bill provides that utility com- 
pany stockholders may approve the 
sale by a majority rather than a two- 
thirds vote, which is at present 
required. 



Workers Housed in Units in 
2 Bay Counties Total 40,000 

Alameda-Contra Costa County civ- 
ilian war workers totaling 40,000 and 
including former residents of the 48 
states and all American Territories 
are living in war housing units of the 
National Housing Agency, the Oak- 
land Chamber announced. 

• This information was revealed 
by Robert S. Grant, division manager, 
War Housing Centers of the counties, 
in an official report to Eugene Weston, 
Jr., regional representative of the Na- 
tional Housing Agency, San Fran- 
cisco, covering the period from Febru- 
ary 16 to June 15. 

• Grant's report reveals that 
21,207 units were rented during the 
period, including 9,787 family units 
and 11,420 single rooms. The five 
centers placed 19.5 per cent of the 
total applications for family units and 
99.5 per cent of the requests for single 
rooms. 

Total applications for housing 
shelter during the period exceeded 
the 61,500 mark, including 50,210 
for family units and 11,459 for 
single room accommodations. 



Lundborg Conducts Course 

Louis B. Lundborg, general mana- 
ger, San Francisco Chamber, will con- 
duct a two-day course on Public Rela- 
tions at the Western Institute for 
Commercial and Trade Association 
Executives, which will be held at the 
University of Oregon, Eugene, Ore., 
for the week of June 25 to July 1. 



Making important contributions to 
the war effort, mercury mines in eight 
counties of Northern California made 
new production records in 1943, ac- 
cording to information received by the 
San Francisco Chamber's Industrial 
Department from the U. S. Bureau of 
Mines. 

• Nine counties of the State are 
represented by California's major mer- 
cury sources, including Contra Costa, 
Lake, Napa, San Benito, San Luis 
Obispo, Santa Barbara, Santa Clara, 
Sonoma and Yolo. 

• Out of 146 mines in the United 
Stateswhich produced 51,929 seventy- 
six-pound flasks worth $10,137,060 in 
1943, 65 were in California. The 65 
mines produced 33,812 seventv-six- 
pound flasks valued at $6,600,440. 

Many of the major mercury- 
producing companies have their 
headquarters in San Francisco. 

• In 1942, the California mines pro- 
duced 29,906 flasks valued at S5,- 
872,043. 



New Air Service Soon 
Says United Air Lines 

As soon as equipment is available 
and operations are authorized on the 
basis of wartime needs, a new direct 
air passenger, mail and express service 
into New England for San Francisco 
and other Pacific Coast cities will be 
inaugurated by United Air Lines. 
• The new service was assured 
when the Civil Aeronautics Board at 
Washington, D. C, authorized United 
Air Lines to operate a Cleveland- 
Hartford-Boston route. 

According to W. A. Patterson, 
president, this move will give the 
Pacific Coast a new direct link with 
nine million people of New 
England. 

The type of planes United expects 
to place in service after the war would 
give Coast cities approximately ten 
hour and twenty minute service to Bos- 
ton, Patterson said. 



1944 Economic Survey 
of San Francisco Booklet 
Available at Chamber 

The 32-page 1944 San Francisco 
Economic Survey, a service of the Re- 
search Department of the San Fran- 
cisco Chamber, has just been com- 
pleted. 

• "San Francisco, gateway to the 
Pacific and key to the Western Em- 
pire, is outstanding on the Pacific 
Coast, ranking — first in water-borne 
commerce; first as a financial center 
and security market ; first as a market 
and distribution center ; first in whole- 
sale trade; first in economy of dis- 
tribution costs to Western Markets; 
first in per capita development; first 
in annual business volume based on 
corporation income taxes; and first 
in effective buying power per capita," 
according to the survey. 

• Included in the survey are analy- 
ses of the Western Regional, Pa- 
cific Coast, Central Pacific Coast, and 
Bay Area markets. The survey also 
covers the fields of agriculture, min- 
ing, transportation, traffic, water- 
borne commerce, foreign trade, manu- 
factures, retail trade and service es- 
tablishments, wholesale trade, finance, 
building, real estate, taxes, public utili- 
ties, population, occupations, living 
conditions, education, civic, social 
and recreation; climate; and winds 
up with a statistical summary. 



Fifth War Loan Drive Here 
Meets With Great Success 

By the end of the first week of the 
Fifth War Loan Drive, notable prog- 
ress was reported in San Francisco 
and Northern California. 

Individual San Francisco buyers 
of war bonds had chalked up a 
total of 14 per cent of the quota 
with a total of $10,872,696. 
• In Northern California, indi- 
viduals had purchased 9.2 per cent of 
quota with a total of $20,65 1 ,000. 

Federal government bonds worth 
$300,000 are to be purchased by the 
Golden Gate Bridge and Highway 
District during the 5th War Loan J 
bond drive. 



Get a LIFT 

with a WAR BOND! 



Thursday, June 22, 1944 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Schofield Named Director 
On Berkeley Chamber Board 

J. W. Schofield, sales engineer with 
the American Rolling Mill Company 
of California, has been elected a di- 
rector of the Berkeley Chamber of 
Commerce, according to Board Chair- 
man \Y. H. Park. 

Schofield has had many years 
experience in the steel industry. 
He has been associated with the 
American Rolling Mill Company 
for fifteen years and is at present 
engaged in the wholesale distribu- 
tion of iron and steel products. 

• Schofield replaces on the Berkeley 
Chamber Board of Directors Red- 
mond C. Staats, Jr., who plans to 
enter the armed services soon. 



Pamphlet For Industry 
V-Gardens Available 

• Tip for industrial dirt farmers: 

A "Manual for Company-Employee 
Gardens" has been prepared by the 
National Victory Garden Institute, 
according to an announcement by 
Norvell Gillespie, Pacific Coast Di- 
rector. It is a 40-page illustrated book 
for executives only, and gives many 
examples of Victory Gardens success- 
fully developed by industrial firms. 

• Advantages of gardens: improved 
worker morale, better health, reduced 
absenteeism. 

For a copy, write NVGI, 804 
Crocker Building, San Francisco, 
California. 



San Francisco Youth 
In Urgent Demand For 
Harvesting 1944 Crops 

Plans for youth participation in the 
1944 field camps of the Wartime Har- 
vest Council are now complete, and a 
campaign to recruit volunteers is now 
underway, Edson Abel, chairman, 
announced recently. 

• Responsible boys and girls are 

urgently needed to help in the har- 
vesting of pears and prunes in the 
Geyserville, Sonoma County, area; of 
peaches and grapes in the Livingston, 
Merced County, area; and of apricots 
in the Sunnyvale, Santa Clara County, 
area, Abel explained. 

For further information, get in 
touch with the Farm Labor Office, 
465 California Street, San Fran- 
cisco 4, EXbrook 5586. 



City of Paris Exhibit 

Plans for the Golden Gate Interna- 
tional Airport will be displayed in the 
Geary Street window of the City of 
Paris Department Store, from Satur- 
day, June 24 to Saturday, July 1. 

• The airport project is sponsored 

by City of Berkeley, Berkeley Cham- 
ber of Commerce, City of Albany, 
Albany Chamber of Commerce, Parr 
Terminal Co. 

This airport would be on filled land 
in the Bav, off Berkelev and Albanv. 



COMPARATIVE STATISTICAL DATA 



Subject:— Population and Manufacturing Data— 1943 and 1939. 
Source: — U. S. Census Bureau Reports. Prepared by: — Industrial 
Department, San Francisco Chamber of Commerce. 



Value of Factory Products 
Civilian Population in 1939 

Nov. 1, 1943 Thousands of DoUars 



San Francisco County 

5 S. F. Bay Area Countie 

6 S. F. Bay Area Countie 



California 

Oregon 

Washington 

No. Cal., Ore.. Was] 

3 Pacific States 

7 Western States e 

11 Western States (1 

Other 37 States 

United States 



Amount 


Ratios 


Amount 


Ratios 


685,951 


_j 


313,253 


.6 


1,727,3*9 


1.4 


960,636 


1.7 


1.822,984 


1.4 


976,674 


1.7 


2,127,117 


1.7 


1.076.449 


1.9 


2,4*7,090 


1.9 


1,171,327 


2.1 


7.881.694 


6.2 


2,798,180 


4.9 


1.172,674 


.9 


365,374 


.6 


1,905,239 


1.5 


636,650 


1.1 


6.613.428 




2,426,178 


4.3 


10,959,607 


8.6 


3.800,204 


6.7 


12,716.339 


10.0 


4.175,962 


7.4 


14.979.325 


11.8 


4,620,037 


8.1 


112,328.559 


88.2 


52.222.988 


91.9 


127.307,884 


100.0 


56,843.025 


100.0 



{«) Alameda. Contra Costa, Marin. San Francisco and San Mateo Counties, referred to as the San Francisco- 
Oakland Industrial Area in Census Reports, (b.i .Alameda. Contra Costa. Marin. San Francisco. San Mateo and 
referred to as San Frandsco-Oaklarid Metropolitan Counties in Census Reports. (c) Adds 



"War Service Day" Held 
By Southern Pacific R R 
To Honor Servicemen 

Rededicating themselves to greater 
efforts on the home front, employees of 
the Southern Pacific Railroad ob- 
served "Southern Pacific War Service 
Day." in honor of the more than 15,000 
who have left the company for service 
in the armed forces. 

• Rallies were held at many points, 
and at the railroad's general offices in 
San Francisco a huge new service flag 
was unveiled including a gold star in 
homage to the 56 S. P. men who have 
died in service. 

"Invasion of Western Europe 
gives each of us in transporta- 
tion service special responsibility 
and opportunity to help person- 
ally in the decisive effort upon 
which depends the lives of thou- 
sands of American boys and the 
fate of free men everywhere," said 
A. T. Mercier in a message to 
employees. 

"Let us all, on the tracks and on the 
trains, in the yards, shops and offices, 
give our best to move with utmost 
safety and dispatch the materials and 
men entrusted to us, realizing that the 
decision rests on how well we sustain 
the offensive now beginning." 



Solano Counti- 

Napa, Santa Clara and Sonoma Counties to the preceding group, frequently meant when the term "San Francisco 
Bay Area is used. (d) Adds Sacramento and San Joaquin Counties, i.e) Arizona, California. Idaho. Nevada. 
Oregon, Utah, Washington, (f) Arizona, California, Colorado. Idaho, Montana. Nevada. New Mexico. Oregon. 



Stockton Record Production 
Figures Announced by C of C 

Due to expanded production of 
ships and war weapons, the 28-1 manu- 
facturing plants in Metropolitan 
Stockton used a record daily average 
of 16,6-15 men and women industrial 
workers and paid out a total of S33,- 
775.59S in salaries and wages in 1943, 
according to an announcement by 
Russell Bjorn, Gen. Mgr., Stockton 
Chamber of Commerce. 

• The city's 10 shipyards were its 
"big business," employing a daily av- 
erage of 8000 workers and having a 

! combined 12-month payroll of $20,- 
385,098,, according to the Stockton 
Chamber. 

• General manufacturing indus- 
tries, numbering 267, used a daily 
average of 4645 workers and had a 
yearly payroll of SH, 148,000. 

• Six seasonal canneries and a can 

manufacturing plant employed an av- 
erage of 4,000 workers over an average 
working period of six months and paid 
out $2,267,500 in salaries and wages. 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Thursday, June 22, 1944 



FOREIGN TRADE TIPS 

Members interested in foreign 
inquiries for purchase of goods 
and foreign offers of sale of mer- 
chandise are invited to have their 
names placed on the World Trade 
Department's mailing list for the 
"Foreign Trade Tips" Bulletin 
distributed weekly. 

A sample copy will be for- 
warded on request by tele- 
phone — EXbrook 4511, Local 
71. 



Port of San Francisco 
Will Be Nation's First 
Says General Kells 

"San Francisco is rapidly ap- 
proaching the No. 1 position 
among the nation's embarkation 
ports," said Brig. Gen. C. H. Kells, 
recently appointed Commander of the 
San Francisco Port of Embarkation. 

"It is already on an equality with 
New York as far as tonnage and 
troop transportation figures go. New 
York has about reached its peak load," 
General Kells added. 

"But San Francisco can be ex- 
pected to show figures that double, 
and may triple the present figures 
when the war shifts to the Pacific. ' ' 
• General Kells replaces Major 
General Frederick Gilbreath, who has 
been Commander of the San Fran- 
cisco Port of Embarkation since 1941. 



Birthday Lunch 

(Continued from Page 1) 

The birthday luncheon at the Palace 
Hotel has been planned by the Citi- 
zens' Committee to accommodate at 
least 250. 

• Price and Reservations — Price 
for the luncheon is $2.00. Reserva- 
tions can be made at the office of the 
Chamber, EXbrook 4511, or at the 
door. 



Published weekly at 3Si Pine St., San 
Francisco, Zone 4, County of San 
Francisco, California. Will Williams, 
Editor. Telephone EXbrook 4511. Sub- 
scription, Fifty Cents a Year (Included 
in Annual Dues). 

Entered as Second-Class matter April 
26, 1944, at the Post Office at San 
Francisco, California, under the act of 
March 3, 1870. 



Junior Chamber Selected For 
Two National Second Awards 



Need For Port Volunteers 
Told To Foreign Trade Group 

The urgent war need for volunteers 
from San Francisco businessmen for 
part time duty on the Port Security 
Force was told to the Foreign Trade 
Association of the San Francisco 
Chamber of Commerce at its monthly 
meeting, Monday, June 19. 

• The appeal was made by Ens. 
Robert C. Garvey of the United 
States Coast Guard. 

Garvey reminded Association mem- 
bers that regular Coast Guardsmen 
were needed on beaches of many 
islands in the South Pacific. By volun- 
teering part time duty every week, 
through joining the Volunteer Port 
Security Force, businessmen in San 
Francisco have the opportunity to 
give visible service to their country at 
war. 

Washington Notes 

(Continued from Page 1) 

• Price Control — On Friday, June 9, 
Senator Robert A. Taft of Ohio ad- 
dressed the Senate on the general sub- 
ject of price control and stabilization. 
Senator Taft said in part: "The whole 
theory that the Price Administrator 
can force manufacturers to sell certain 
lines at cost, or less than cost, because 
they are making profits on other lines, 
is absolutely contrary to the prin- 
ciples of the Price Control Act, and 
would lead ultimately to a fixing of in- 
dividual profits, instead of to a fixing 
of prices." 



The San Francisco Chamber of Commerce 

333 Pine St., San Francisco, 4 
EXbrook 4311 



The San Francisco Junior Chamber 
of Commerce received two awards at 
the national convention of United 
States junior chambers in Omaha. 

• Competing with the 836 junior 
chambers in the nation, the San Fran- 
cisco Junior Chamber won second 
place in aviation and was awarded 
another second in safety. 

• The promotion of these two civic 
projects in San Francisco was accom- 
plished by the Junior Chamber 
through setting aside Kitty Hawk 
Day on December 17 for celebrating 
the birthday of aviation in the United 
States, and through an extensive cam- 
paign during 1943 for motor vehicle 
and pedestrian safety in this city. 

"The Junior Chamber is to be 
commended for the fine work it 
has done in these and other con- 
structive city projects," said San 
Francisco Chamber President 
Adrien J. Falk. 






"Stay on the Job" - D T 

The Office of Defense Transporta- 
tion is making an urgent appeal to all 
Pacific Coast railroad workers to 
"stick on the job, now that the 
big invasion push has started." 

G. B. Herington, ODT Transport 
Personnel Representative in San Fran- 
cisco, pointed out that freight move- 
ments to the coast have been mount- 
ing steadily and railroads here must 
hire thousands each month "to keep 
up with those leaving their jobs." 




SW# Beaton ^u&we44- 

W PURlKMFn RV TUP 



Volume 



W PUBLISHED BY T 

SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 

Thursday, June 29, 1944 



Number 13 



WASHINGTON NOTES 



• Congress — After nearly six busy 
months of legislative activity and con- 
tests with administrative agencies as 
to how the government should func- 
tion, members of the 78th Congress 
(Second Session) are taking a well- 
earned recess extending over the 
period for the Democratic and Re- 
publican National Conventions. 

Although Congress has ad- 
journed until August 1, legislative 
activity will be at a standstill, if 
all goes well, until September. 

• Lumber — Effective August 1. 1944, 
the War Production Board will es- 
tablish over-all control of lumber. This 
control will affect all users of lumber, 
wholesale and retail distributors, and 
all but the very smallest sawmills. 

According to the War Produc- 
tion Board, it will affect the 
householders who use lumber for 
a shelf or a bookcase or for a new 
porch floor as well as the large in- 
dustrial consumers who use lum- 
ber in the manufacture of ship- 
ping boxes and crates, ships and 
motor trucks, furniture, agricul- 
tural implements, and the almost 
countless other items for which 
lumber is used. 

• Veterans' Legislation — The Presi- 
dent has signed the so-called "G. I. 
Joe" bill which provides certain bene- 
fits for veterans. The bill provides for 
one to three years of education in in- 
stitutions to be approved by State 
Educational Agencies or the Veterans 
Administration and includes a tuition 
payment up to S500 a year plus sub- 
sistence of $50 per month without de- 
pendents or $75 per month with de- 
pendents. 

Five hundred million dollars is 
included for additional hospital 
facilities, guaranteeing adequate 
treatment and up to fifteen years 

(Continued on Page 4) 



Chamber Favors Freeway Move 
for Airport Expansion West 



Businessmen Asked to 
Return Questionnaires 
By C. E. D. Chairman 

An urgent appeal to employers and 
business executives to fill out and re- 
turn the questionnaire of the San 
Francisco Chamber Committee for 
Economic Development, issued from 
the Federal Reserve Bank of San 
Francisco, is being made by L. W. 
Lane, San Francisco District C.E.D. 
Chairman. 

"This is the essential first step 
in local application of the national 
C.E.D. program," Lane explained. 
"This is a questionnaire de- 
signed to help business and the 
time required to fill it out is an in- 
vestment in the future of San 
Francisco." 

• Lane stressed that questionnaires 
are completely confidential, and that 
only genera! totais will be made 
public. 



San Francisco's Birthday 

"Today marks San Fran- 
cisco's celebration of its 168th 
birthday," said Adrien J. Falk, 
president, San Francisco Cham- 
ber of Commerce, "and is an oc- 
casion to recall San Francisco's 
aggressive determination and 
spirit of 'getting things done'. 
We have a heritage of accom- 
plishment from the pioneers who 
built this city, which it is our ob- 
ligation to carry forward not 
only to victory but into a pros- 
perous postwar world." 



The moving of the Bayshore Free- 
way westward of its present location 
to permit the maximum efficiency of 
operation of San Francisco Airport is 
advocated by the Board of Directors 
of the San Francisco Chamber of 
Commerce. 

• Proposals advocating the move- 
ment of the Freeway were presented 
to the Board by the Street and High- 
wax' Committee after extensive study 
and consideration. 

The action was taken in view of 
construction that is now going 
on — and more which is planned 
for the near future — which will 
make the airport not only a center 
for West Coast and trans-Pacific 
traffic but one of the first in the 
nation. 

• Extent of the construction is 
such that an expansion of the port's 
area throughout the airport property 
must take place. While a certain 
amount of expansion eastward into 
the Bay is possible, that alone, it is 
felt, would not be sufficient to care for 
the ultimate development of the air- 
port. 

• Land lying just West of the high- 
way, against which present structures 
of the Army and airlines are now 
crowding, is vitally needed to form the 
integrated whole which can assure the 
greatest efficiency in operation. 

Postwar Plan Displayed 

The San Francisco El-Way, pro- 
posed by Metropolitan Developers, 
will be displayed in the Geary Street 
window of the City of Paris depart- 
ment store, beginning Saturday, July 
1 to Saturday, July 8. 

The El-Way consists of a tunnel and 
elevated hi-way designed for speed, 
safety and distribution of traffic to 
downtown areas. 



A San Francisco Luncheon! (see Page 3) 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Thursday, June 29, 1944 



Bay Region C of C Officials 

Attending Western Institute 



Postwar Sessions Held 
in Oakland to Plan 
For Housing, Industry 

The Oakland Chamber of Com- 
merce has announced a series of busi- 
ness sessions to discuss postwar con- 
struction and future disposal of war 
properties; public and residential 
housing and other industrial plans. 

Sessions will be conducted for 
the major committees of the Oak- 
land Postwar Planning Com- 
mittee. 

• A special session was held, Tues- 
day, June 27, under direction of Ber- 
nard Abrott, chairman, Committee on 
Disposal of War Property, to consider 
policies referring to the future dis- 
posal of war properties. The group 
considered lands in use for war ac- 
tivity, war housing, and surplus ma- 
terials and supplies in relation to the 
formation of these policies. 

• Topics already discussed in these 
sessions are : Construction industry re- 
quirements as related to manpower 
and materials availability; and resi- 
dential development and housing 
programs. 

The purpose of these sessions is to 
formulate a residential and industrial 
pattern of the future. 



Three San Franciscans 
Named to OPA Groups 

Three local businessmen have been 
appointed recentlv to Office of Price 
Administration Industry Advisory 
committees. 

• B. T. Rocca, president and general 
manager, Pacific Vegetable Oil Cor- 
poration, San Francisco, has been 
made a member of the OPA Linseed 
Meal Industry Advisory Committee, 
according to an announcement from 
Washington. This committee is one 
of three identified with the animal 
feed industry. 

• F. A. Mainzer, manager, Pacific 
Brass Foundry of San Francisco, has 
been appointed to serve for a second 
term on the Non-Ferrous Foundries 
Industry* Advisory Committee of the 
OPA. 

• J. A. Stapleton of Stapleton Lum- 
ber and Piling Co., San Francisco, has 
been named member of the Douglas 
Fir Pole and Piling Industry Advisory 
Committee. 



Eight Bay Region chamber of com- 
merce officials are attending the an- 
nual Western Institute of Commer- 
cial and Trade Association Execu- 
tives, now being held at the Uni- 
versity of Oregon, Eugene, Oregon. 
• Attending are: Mrs. Iona Booth, 
secretary, Contra Costa Development 
Association; Leslie J. Freeman, secre- 
tary-manager, San Leandro Chamber 
of Commerce; Louis B. Lundborg, 
general manager, San Francisco 
Chamber of Commerce; Russell E. 
Pettit, manager, San Jose Chamber of 
Commerce; J. Delbert Sarber, general 
manager, Berkeley Chamber of Com- 
merce; Howard Sipe, publicity direc- 
tor, Oakland Chamber of Commerce; 
and C. P. Tanner, Domestic Trade 
Department manager, San Francisco 
Chamber. 

Lundborg, Pettit and Sarber are 
lecturing at the Institute. 



Fruit Shipments Gain 
In Santa Clara County 

Santa Clara County gained in ship- 
ments of fresh deciduous fruits to 
other states by 151 carloads last year 
over 1942, according to the San Jose 
Chamber of Commerce announce- 
ment. 

According to the Federal-State 
Market News Service, the San Jose 
Chamber said, 627 carloads were 
shipped from Santa Clara County 
in 1943, compared with 476 the 
preceding year. 

• The Chamber announced that 
from figures received from the Cali- 
fornia Crop Reporting Service, the 
Santa Clara Valley is expected to har- 
vest 289,000 tons of apricots; 418,000 
tons of clingstone peaches; 155,000 
tons of prunes; and 162,000 tons of 
Bartlett pears during 1944. These pre- 
dictions show sizeable increases in the 
apricot and clingstone peach crop. 



Builders of West Appointment 

Guy M. Mac Vicar has been ap- 
pointed District Director for Builders 
of the West, Inc., in the nine San 
Francisco Bay Area counties, accord- 
ing to an announcement by Rex L. 
Nicholson, managing director. 

MacVicar has been associated with 
Marinship, Bechtel- Price- Callahan, 
and oil construction projects in Saudi 
Arabia and Behrein Island in recruit- 
ing and housing activities. 



C of C Board Members 
To Meet Weekly With 
S. F. City Supervisors 

The Board of Directors of the San 
Francisco Chamber has decided to 
send representatives each week to the 
meeting of the City's Board of Super- 
visors, according to an announcement 
by Chamber President Adrien J. Falk. , 

• Three Chamber officers at- 
tended the Supervisors' meeting 
Monday, June 26, namely — Falk, 
president; Treasurer Prentiss A. Rowe 
and Assistant Treasurer John C. 
McPherson. 

• In addition to Board members, 
representatives of Chamber commit- 
tees will sit in on Supervisors' sessions 
each week. A staff representative at- 
tends regularly at present. 

"This decision reflects a recog- 
nition on the part of the Chamber 
Board of its civic obligation to 
take a constructive part in city 
government affairs," said Cham- 
ber President Falk. "In order to 
be helpful, civic groups must be 
informed. Hence, our decision to 
maintain close liaison with the 
city's legislative body." 

• Board members Herbert V. Al- 
ward and George H. Jess will repre- 
sent the Chamber at the next meeting 
of the Board of Supervisors, Monday, 
July 3. 

Highway Commission Votes 
More Funds For Road Repairs 

After a three-day tour of Marin, 
Sonoma, Mendocino, Lake and Napa 
counties, the California Highway 
Commission voted funds for the fol- 
lowing state highway repair work, | 
according to an announcement by the j 
Redwood Empire Association. 

• Marin County, State Route 1 — 
S370 to provide additional funds for 
repair work. 

• Sonoma County, State Route 2 
— S431 for repairs. 

The sum of $20,000 was pre- 
viously allocated for the Marin 
County route and $9,000 for the 
Sonoma County route, but the ad- 
ditional funds voted were needed 
to do the jobs adequately. 



Buying a Depression? 

BUY WAR BONDS 
INSTEAD! 






Thursday, June 29, 1944 BAY REGION BUSINESS 



A Picture of Our City Tomorrow 



PRESENTED BY 



L. DEMING TILTON 



DIRECTOR OF PLANNING, CITY OF SAN FRANCISCO 
LECTURER ON PLANNING, UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



Here is an opportunity to learn firsthand about spec/Jic plans for 

"The Future San Francisco/" 

AT LUNCHEON IN THE COMMERCIAL CLUB 

Thursday, July 13, 1944 



SPONSORED BY 



San Francisco Chamber of Commerce 
San Francisco Commercial Club 



At Luncheon in 



>AN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 
533 Pine Street, San Francisco, California 

Please reserve place(s) for me at $1.50 each at 1 llC o3.ll Jrra.flClSCO 

uncheon honoring L. Deming Tilton on Thursday, July 13, in PflfTiniPrriCll fMllh 

he San Francisco Commercial Club, at 12 noon. (Kindly enclose 

»elf-addressed envelope for forwarding tickets.) Thursday Noon, July 13, 1944 

Price $1.50 per plate 

Name { $1.46 plus 4c tax} 



Check Firm 



Enclosed K.3.V.F. Members will be taken care ot tc 

Address the limit of capacity and as received, but ii 

will be to your advantage to make reserva- 
tions early before ticket sales are opened tc 

% __ the general public. 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Thursday, June 29, 1944 



Deas, Daniels of S. F. 
Named Officers of 
State Junior Chamber 

J. Roger Deas, secretary, City Plan- 
ning Commission, and Mark Daniels, 
Jr., member, San Francisco Junior 
Chamber Board of Directors, have 
been named president and treasurer 
respectively of the California State 
Junior Chamber of Commerce. 

Deas was formerly manager of 
the San Francisco Junior Chamber 
of Commerce. 

• The State Junior Chamber is an 
association of 43 local Junior Cham- 
bers. Members at home total 6,700, 
with over 11,000 members in the 
service. 

; "We believe the months ahead 
will be the most important in the 
Junior Chamber's 25-year his- 
tory," said President Deas. 

"The day of victory may be closer 
than we think. We must be certain we 
are equipped to meet economic and 
employment readjustments, and that 
a just and equitable peace treaty is 
drawn. 

"In all of these problems and 
opportunities the young men 
must have a strong and concerted 
voice, for theirs is the responsi- 
bility of today and tomorrow." 



Washington Notes 

(Continued from Page 1) 

for filing claims. Employment 
benefits consist of fifty-two weeks 
of eligibility at $20 per week with 
allowances to self-employed per- 
sons in "period of development." 
Instead of direct loans, the legis- 
lation provides for a guarantee of 
fifty percent to a total guarantee 
of $2,000, four percent interest. 
Under this provision veterans 
could obtain a loan of $4,000 with 
50% guaranteed and the first 
year's interest paid by the Gov- 
ernment. 



Published weekly at 333 Pine St., San 
Francisco, Zone 4, County of San 
Francisco, California. Will Williams, 
Editor. Telephone EXbrook 45 1 1 . Sub- 
scription, Fifty Cents a Year (Included 
in Annual Dues). 

Entered as Second-Class matter April 
26, 1944, at the Post Office at San 
Francisco, California, under the act of 
March 3, 1870. 



C of C Board Approves Street, 
Highway Policies of U.S. Chamber 



List of Shortages Available 

A list showing a number of 
shortages in hard goods items for 
civilian use compiled by the War 
Production Board's Office of 
Civilian Requirements is avail- 
able to anyone interested, at the 
San Francisco Chamber office. 



San Francisco Advertisers 
Urged to Support War Effort 

"Today, we have a wonderful ex- 
ample of advertisers' cooperation 
with the war program . . . given 
the Fifth War Loan Drive by San 
Francisco advertisers," said Harold 
R. Deal, chairman, executive com- 
mittee, Victory Advertising Com- 
mittee of the San Francisco Advertis- 
ing Club. 

• However, Deal urges advertisers 
to continue their support by aiding 
in "recruitment, salvage, blood dona- 
tions, crop harvesting, food processing, 
canteen work," and other important 
war activities. 



i/Jake every advertise 
produced in San Francisco 
aid oar Country's war effort. 



Thirteen resolutions ranging from 
financing of highways to the establish- 
ment of off-street parking facilities, 
upon which a referendum was recently 
conducted by the Chamber of Com- 
merce of the United States, have been 
approved in principle by the Board of 
Directors of the San Francisco 
Chamber. 

Board approval was based upon 
results of a study by theChamber's 
Street and Highway Committee. 

• The Board stipulated, however, 
that wherever these resolutions are in 
conflict with practices authorized by 
the California State Highway Code, 
the policies created especially for the 
State should prevail. 

Wherever resolutions conflict with 
proposed postwar federal aid road leg- 
islation, the Board reserved judgment 
for consideration of special factors in- 
volved in the situation. 



New Color Photographic 
Method Announced 

A new method for color photog- 
raphy, called Thomascolor, has been 
developed by Richard Thomas Enter- 
prises, Inc., with plants and labora- 
tories in Hollywood and offices in 
Oakland. 

• The new process, invented by 
Richard Thomas, photographs ob- 
jects in natural color, using regular 
black and white panchromatic film 
with the aid of special lenses. 



The San Francisco Chamber of Commerce 

333 Pina St., Son Franclico, 4 
EXbrook 4511 




SW# Beaton ^>oc4irte44~ 

* W PUBLISHED BY THI 



Volume I 



PUBLISHED BY THE 

SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 

Thursday, July 6, 1944 



Number 14 



Business Activity Edition 



Vol. 15, No. 5 of Business Activity Series 



Thumb Nail Sketch 

The Research Department 

San Francisco Chamber 

of Commerce 

I War contracts and project orders 
>laced in the Bay Region during the 
March-April period amounted to $69,- 
S66,000 and carried the cumulative 
or this area to S4.522, 500,000. Proj- 
:ct orders accounted for S47,124,000 
)f the March-April awards, supply 
;ontracts for S19,620.000, and indus- 
trial facility contracts for 52,822,000. 
The cumulative total through 
April for supply contracts 
amounted to $3,003,794,000 of 
which $2,484,098,000 were for 
ships, $74,691,000 for ordnance, 
and $441,578,000 for unidentified. 
Project orders cumulative through 
April amounted to $855,702,000. 
Facility contracts cumulative 
through March totaled $657,004,- 
000 of which $361,721,000 were 
industrial and $295,283,000 for 
military. 

• May employment in the manu- 
facturing industries in the San Fran- 
cisco Industrial Area was 1.1 per cent 
under April and 6.0 per cent below 
May last year. Of the 252,600 total, 
202,200 were in the durable group 
and 50,400 in the non-durable group 
compared to 205,000 in the durable 
group and 50,400 in the non-durable 
group in April. 

The non-durable group was at 
the highest level this year and 
was 1000 above May last year. 

• Payrolls in the manufacturing in- 
dustries during May were 1.8 per cent 
below the preceding month and down 
JL7 per cent compared to last May. 
The cumulative for the 5 months 
ftras up 5.5 per cent compared to the 

iame period last year. 
Average hours worked per week 
mounted to 45.1 compared to 
5.3 in April and 44.5 in May a 



year ago. Average hourly earnings 
amounted to $1.32 compared to 
$1,326 in April and $1,284 last 
May. Average weekly earnings for 
May amounted to $59.53 com- 
pared to $60.03 in April and $57.10 
last May. 

• May department store sales in 
the Bay Region reported by the 
Federal Reserve Bank were 12 per 
cent above last May, and apparel 
store sales up 23 per cent, with the 
five months' cumulative sales up 7 per 
cent and 14 per cent respectively 
compared to the same period last 
year. 

Department store sales during 
May and for the 5 months' cumu- 
lative compared to the same pe- 
riod last year for other areas were 
as follows: Central Valley, 21 per 
cent and 12 per cent; Fresno, 35 
per cent and 31 per cent; Sacra- 
mento, 18 per cent and 6 per cent; 
Stockton, 18 per cent and 9 per 
cent; San Jose, 15 per cent and 10 
per cent; and Santa Rosa, 21 per 
cent and 12 per cent. 

• Trade at wholesale during the 
first 4 months on the Pacific Coast 
compared to the similar period last 
year was up 3 per cent based on 271 




reports to the Census Bureau. Auto- 
motive supplies led the groups with 
a 31 per cent increase. The plumbing 
and heating group showed a drop of 
17 per cent, the greatest of all groups. 
• Bay Region financial transac- 
tions measured by Mav bank debits 
amounted to $1,951,447,000. This 
was $198,908,000 or 11.3 per cent 
above last Mav. The 5 months' cumu- 
lative of S10,i91,843,000 was up 15 
per cent over the same period last 
year. 

•{May freight movements within 
the San Francisco-Oakland switching 
limits climbed to a new monthly high 
of 71,148 cars or 12 per cent above 
last May; cumulative carloadings for 
the 5 months amounted to 330,454 
and were 10 percent above last May. 
•iMay general business activity in 
San Francisco turned up 2.8 per cent 
from the April level to 174.8 by our 
index, and was 12.9 per cent above 
May last year. Cumulative activity 
for the first 5 months was 13.2 per 
cent above the same period last year. 
May real estate sales in San Fran- 
cisco numbering 1,109 valued at 
$9,723,137 made a spectacular in- 
crease over last May of 33 per cent 
in number and 58.3 per cent in 
amount. Building permits value, 
in contrast, slumped to the lowest 
monthly level this year and were 90.6 
per cent below last May, although the 
additions, alterations, and repairs 
group was up 58 per cent in number 
of permits and 90.5 per cent in value. 
San Francisco May postal receipts 
amounting to $3,323,674 were 153.3 
per cent above last May, with air 
mail loaded topping last May by 
(Continued, Page 2, Column 1) 

Announcement of School on 

Contract Termination 

(See Page Z, Column 3) 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Thursday, July 6, 1944 



Tilton, Planning Expert, 
To Speak at C of C Lunch 

A luncheon to be held for L. Dem- 
ing Tilton, Director of Planning, City 
of San Francisco, on Thursday, July 
13, will give San Francisco business- 
men the opportunity to learn firsthand 
the plans for improving this city as 
projected by the municipal govern- 
ment, according to Chamber Presi- 
dent Adrien J. Falk. 

• The luncheon will be held in the 

San Francisco Commercial Club and 
is sponsored by the San Francisco 
Chamber and the Club. 

• Guest Speaker Tilton has been en- 
gaged in city planning and architec- 
tural engineering activities since 1915. 

He has had experience in the 
preparation of master plans and 
city planning reports in over fifty 
cities in the nation, including 
New York, Washington, D. C., 
Pittsburgh, New Orleans, and was 
Director of Planning for Santa 
Barbara County, and Planning 
Consultant for numerous Cali- 
fornia counties and cities. 

From 1934 to 1942, Tilton was Con- 
sultant, National Resources Planning 
Board, and from 1941 to 1942 he was 
acting Regional Chairman for the 
Board. 

• He has prepared numerous pub- 
lished and unpublished reports and 
special studies on state and regional 
planning, master plans, zoning, and 
plans for institutions, schools, new 
town sites, subdivisions and play- 
grounds. 



Business Activity 

(Continued from Page 1) 

106.7 per cent. Passenger traffic at 
the San Francisco Airport established 
a new monthly high during May of 
20,851. Industrial and commercial 
gas sales were only slightly below 
the previous monthly total which was 
the highest on record. 

• Placements in San Francisco 
during May were 10,431 persons; 
industrial placements accounted for 
9,173 and were 16.2 per cent over last 
May, while commercial placements 
accounted for 1,258 and were off 
2.6 per cent. 

• May cost of living represented by 
the U. S. Labor Department's index 
for San Francisco at 129.1 was up 0.8 
per cent from the preceding month 
and also compared to May last year. 

During the first 5 months, living 
costs averaged 1.2 per cent above 
the same period last year. 



China Aircraft Plant 
Established in S. F. 

Establishment of a Chinese airplane 
factory in San Francisco was an- 
nounced last week by. the San Fran- 
cisco Chamber. 

Within a year over three thou- 
sand Chinese workers are expected 
to be engaged in producing air- 
plane sub-assemblies under a con- 
tract with Douglas Aircraft Com- 
pany held by China Aircraft Cor- 
poration. 

• The factory is being established at 
122-15th Street in San Francisco, 
work having already commenced on a 
new building to provide 80,000 square 
feet of space. 

"The project reflects a new 
era in international relations and 
augers well for postwar trade," 
commented Chamber President 
Adrien J. Falk. 

• Establishment of the plant is the 
result of over a year's negotiations by 
Dr. S. C. Hu, one of China's outstand- 
ing aeronautical engineers. 

• The corporation, formed by Dr. 
Hu, holds its contract with Douglas 
Aircraft Company with the coopera- 
tion of the Army Air Forces Materiel 
Command, headed in San Francisco 
by Col. A. E. Howse. 

Dr. Hu's negotiations involved 
the State, War, Navy and Treasury 
Departments, the Immigration 
Office of the Department of Jus- 
tice, War Production Board, War 
Manpower Commission, Alien 
Property Custodian, Selective 
Service, Defense Plant Corpora- 
tion, Chinese Embassy, and the 
Washington Office of the Chinese 
Air Forces. 

• The Defense Plant Corporation 
has provided all the necessary funds 
and facilities for the project. 

The China Aircraft Corporation 
is a California company in which 
thirty large Chinese families, rep- 
resentative of San Francisco, are 
interested, including Shuck Ho, 
B. S. Fong, Robert Lee, Dock Joe 
Chin, U. Ong Li, Y. C. Yu, David 
Shew and others. 



Transportation Board Opposed 

The San Francisco Chamber has 
gone on record in opposition to the 
bills which would allow the Board of 
Investigation and Research to func- 
tion another four years. 

The Chamber believes that this 
Board has not carried out its 
assigned duties, but has, on the 
other hand , engaged in extraneous 
activities with a decidedly polit- 
ical tinge. 



Four-Day School on 
Contract Termination 
To be Held Here in July 

A Termination Training Course 
for War Contractors and Suppliers 
will be held July 11 through 
July 14. 

• The course, sponsored by the San 
Francisco Area Office, Materiel Com- 
mand, Army Air Forces, and the San 
Francisco Chamber of Commerce, will 
be held at the Commerce High School 
Auditorium, Hayes and Franklin 
Streets. 

• All local procurement agencies 
are participating, including the Mari- 
time Commission; Chemical Warfare 
Procurement District ; San Francisco 
Loan Agency, Reconstruction Fi- 
nance Corporation; Bureau of the 
Budget; and Army and Navy Pro- 
curement agencies. 

• Among the high ranking Army 
and Navy officials participating either 
as instructors or discussion leaders 
are: Brig. Gen. F. M. Hopkins, chief, 
Resources Division, AAF, Washing- 
ton, D. C. ; Col. David N. Houseman, 
chief, Readjustment Division, AAF, 
Washington, D. C; Col. E. S. Pills- 
bury, chief, Termination Section, 
Hq., AAF Materiel Command, 
Wright Field, Ohio; Col. A. E. Howse,, 
AAF Representative, San Francisco; 
Area Materiel Command; Capt. A. BJ, 
Court, Inspector of Naval Materials; 
and Col. H. E. Bullis, assistant chief,, 
Contract Termination Branch, Read- 
justment Division, AAF, Washington^ 
D. C. 

"Now that procedures have beem 
made uniform by legislation, in- 
formation given in this course* 
will be applicable to all war con- 
tractors and suppliers," said 
Chamber President Adrien J. 
Falk. 

"The Chamber feels strongly that 
anyone doing war work or engaged inr 
services connected with war work< 
such as bankers, accountants, and at< 
torneys. should be given every oppor- 
tunity to become thoroughly familial 
with this subject. 

"Full performance in the wai 
effort must be maintained. Ter- 
mination of a contract does not 
mean victory is around the cornerr 
but if each contractor is equipped 
to perform his part in settling s; 
terminated contract, he will b« 
able to resume normal activity 
quicker and more effectively. 



Buy Bonds Now 



Thursday, July 6, 1944 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



SURVEY OF BUSINESS CONDITIONS 
IN SAN FRANCISCO 



BRANCH OF ACTIVITY 



CONSTRUCTION PERMITS 

Total (number* 

(valu 

Residential. New (number) 

I value 

Single-Family Dwellings. New (number) 



Non-residential. N< 
Additions. Alteratic 
Installations. 



(valu 

. (numbej 

(number) 

. (number) 
(value) 



REAL ESTATE 

Sales (number) 

(value) 
Mortgages and Deeds of Trust (number) 

(amount) 
Releases (number) 

(amount) 



6.677.070 

T.059 

5.414.391 



-30.7 
-90.6 
-S4.1 
-97.1 
-83.9 
-82.0 
-68.8 
-54.1 
58.1 
90S 
173.5 
701.7 



33.0 
58.3 
-3.5 



5.297 
49.085.055 

5.296 
36.795,606 

5.894 
38.223,989 



3.571 
26.199.409 

24,102!008 



FINANCE 

Bank Debits (S000) 

Bank Clearings ($000) 

Postal Receipts 

S. F. Stock Exchange (no. shares traded) 

(market value) 

COMMERCIAL FAILURES (number) 

EMPLOYMENT & PAYROLLS— Bay Area (5 Co. 'si (a) 

Employment (Manufacturing) (Index) 

Payrolls (Manufacturing) (Index) 

NON-MFG. INDUSTRIES (5 Co.'s) (a) (Index) 

Laundering. Cleaning. Dyeing (Payroll) 

Wholesale Trade (Payroll) 

Retail Trade tPayroll) 

Hotels (Payroll) 

PLACEMENTS IN SAN FRANCISCO— U. S. E. S. . 

Industrial Placements (number) 

Commercial Placements (number) 

TRANSPORTATION 

Carloads (numbei 

S. F. Airport Traffic (no. planes) 

(no. passengers' 
Express Shipments — Rail (number ) 



Air 



nber) 



Air Mail Loaded (pounds) 

UTILITIES AND NEW DEVELOPMENTS 

Electric Energy Sales Index (k.w. hrs.) 

Industrial and Commercial Gas Sales (cu. ft.) 

Water Consumers (net gain) 

Tourist and Settler Inquiries (number) 

DAIRY RECEIPTS. FRUITS AND VEGETABLES 

Butter (pounds) 

Cheese (pounds) 

Eggs.. (cases) 

Poultry. Dressed (pounds) 

Fruits and Vegetables (carlots) 

LIVESTOCK SLAUGHTER (b) (total number) 

Cattle (number) 

Calves tnumber) 

Sheep and Lambs (number) 

Hogs (number) 

S. F. LIVING COSTS 1935-39 Average = 100 

Food (Index) 

Clothing (Index) 

Rent (Index) 

Fuel and Liphl (Index) 

House Furnishing Goods (Index) 

Miscellaneous (Index) 

All Items (Index) 



1.4S7.975 
1.166.781 
3.323.674 
439.853 
7.878.328 



149.9 
153.8 
128.6 
180.6 



10.431 
9.173 
1.2S8 



31.414 
1.593 
20.851 
294.764 
9.040 
770.820 



1 .029.284.600 



5.362.640 

1.247.644 

217.237 

2,697.894 

1.785 

242.942 
33.112 
17,178 
85.674 



1.027.356 

1.312.059 

532.535 

7.208,730 



153.8 
128.6 
127.5 
152.2 



28.531 

1.239 

14.958 

241.845 



6.961.188 
1.650.550 

119.139 

702.027 

1.792 

258,348 
21,145 
5,675 

186,113 
45.415 



148.0 
127.5 
106.0 
92.2 
119.0 
12J.7 
128.1 



11.9 
13.6 
153.3 
-17.4 



10.1 
28.6 
39.4 
21.9 
42.9 
106.7 



15.S 
-48.5 
-30.3 



-23.0 

-24.4 

82.3 
2S4.3 

-0.4 ' 

-6.0 
56.6 
202.7 
-54.0 
135.6 



7.809.060 
5.842.488 
14.726.002 
2.404.352 

37.861.437 



150.6 
141.4 
128.6 
181.9 



53.471 
48.335 
5.683 



154.141 

7.074 

87.805 

1.424.832 

38.626 

3.207.650 



4.380.129.700 



15.669.362 

4.S34.5S4 

758.240 



1.012.254 
158.156 
46,164 
435.776 
372.158 



142.9 
134.3 
106 1 
92.4 
120.9 
126.3 
127.8 



6.755.300 
5.095.902 
5.936.S8S 



150.4 
127.7 
126.8 
147.0 

47.988 
40.510 
7.478 



139.593 

5,784 

68.248 

1.268,748 

35.298 

1.518.782 



3.854.997.200 



880.964 
114.060 
17.103 
515.235 
234.567 



144.5 
127.0 
105.2 
92.6 
119.0 
121.4 
126.3 



(ai These data are based on reports submitted to the Dh 



[ Labor Statistics and Law Enforcement, State of California. 



(b) Federal Inspection — San Francisco District. 

Acknowledgment is hereby made to Thomas Magee & Sons. Dun & Bradstreet. Inc.. local utilities, private organizations. Federal 
Reserve Bank of San Francisco. California State Departments of Industrial Relations. Agriculture, and Employment, and the United 
States Departments of Labor. Agriculture, and Commerce, and the United States Bureau of the Census, for the basic data each con- 
tributed toward this survey compiled by the Research Department, San Francisco Chamber of Commerce. 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Thursday, July 6, 1944 



FOREIGN TRADE TIPS 



The Chamber of Commerce cannot 
undertake to guarantee the financial 
standing and responsibility of any 
firm or individual mentioned in 
TRADE TIPS, and it is suggested 
that the usual investigation be made 
in each instance. For further details 
regarding an item call the World 
Trade Department of the San Fran- 
cisco Chamber of Commerce, EX- 
brook 4511, and refer to inquiry by 
the Trade Tip's number. 

3294 REPRESENTATION IN ARGENTINA 

Florencio Heriticr, Avenida Forest, numero 1530, 
Buenos Aires. Argentina, seeks contact with ex- 
porters and importers for their representation in 
Argentina. 

3295 SILVER ARTICLES . . 
Hermilda P. viuda de Urrutia. Monte de Piedad 
numero 3-408, Mexico D.F.. Mexico, is interested 
in the exportation of silver products, made in 
Mexico. 

3296 TRADE WITH ARGENTINA 

A. Colombo Leoru e Hijo. San Lorenzo 1682. 
Rosario. Argentina, wants to be put m touch with 
exporters and importers for their representation 
in Argentina. Bank references supplied. 

3297 PRODUCTS FROM CHILE 

Santiago Pacific Export Soc. Ltda.. Bandera 60. 
20. Piso. Oncina 7. Santiago, Chile, desires con- 
tact with San Francisco importers, interested in 
the purchase of beans, lentils, "lentejones." wax. 
fibre of hemp of different kinds and a gTeat va- 
riety of lumber. 

3298 MEXICAN FURNITURE 

Benjamin Preciado Zepeda. Prisciliano Sanchez 
837. Guadalajara. Jalisco. Mexico, is in position 
to export typical Mexican furniture, [brightly 
painted chairs, sofas, etc.. with rush seats. 

3299 EXPORTATION TO PALESTINE 
Berthold Steinberg, 18 Rothschild Blvd.. Tel- 
Aviv. Palestine, seeks connections with American 
manufacturers and exporters for the sale of then- 
products in Palestine. Reference available at the 
World Trade Department. 

3300 HANDWOVEN TEXTILES 

Carlota Samayoa de Mandrile, 3a Calle Poniente 
de Jocotenango. numero 2. Guatemala City. 
Guatemala. Central America, seeks importers 01 
bandwoven textiles in Mayan style. She makes 
"rebajos." blankets, "huipiles." belts, etc. Design 
sketches and samples of cloth are available at the 
World Trade Department. 

3301 COMMODITIES FROM ARGENTINA 
Schur y Cia.. Alsina 670. esc. 1. Buenos Aires. 
Argentina, is interested in the exportation ol food 
products, liquors, perfumery, textiles, leather 
products, etc. They also want to represent San 
Francisco exporters in Argentina. 

3302 MACHINE FOR PACKING 

Sobrino de Izquierdo. Inc.. P.O. Box 4232. San 
Juan. Puerto Rico, is interested in buying a ma- 
chine for packing olives and capers in glass jars. 

3303 TRADE WITH CUBA 

Pita Hermanos. Estevez 67 y 69. La Habana. 
Cuba, desire contact with American tobacco 
manufacturers and buyers. 



RADIO: KPO— 8:15 a.m., July 
7 — Jane Lee, "Women's Maga- 
zine of the Air" — featuring in- 
terviews of San Francisco women 
harvesters in fields near Sebas- 
topol. 



Published weekly at 333 Pine St., San 
Francisco, Zone 4, County of San 
Francisco, California. Will Williams, 
Editor. Telephone EXbrook 4511. Sub- 
scription, Fifty Cents a Year (Included 
in Annual Dues). 

Entered as Second-Class matter April 
26, 1944, at the Post Office at San 
Francisco, California, under the act of 
March 3, 1870. 



Public Relations and 
Community — Subject 
of Lundborg Lectures 

Louis B. Lundborg, general man- 
ager, San Francisco Chamber, de- 
livered two lectures on "Public 
Relations and the Community" before 
the Western Institute for Commercial 
and Trade Association Executives at 
the University of Oregon, Eugene, on 
June 29 and 30. 

• Keynote of Lundborg's talks was 
that the "community relations" of a 
firm should be viewed "as a special 
problem in the purest part of public 
relations." 

Elaborating, he proceeded to 
show that the most successful 
public relations of a firm result 
from winning and retaining the 
friendship of the public as a whole 
by means of the firm's deeds and 
policies. 

• The job of public relations should 
not be left merely to one man, but 
should be the work of the entire or- 
ganization with especial emphasis on 
the part which executives of the firm 
take in the program. Only through 
such a program, Lundborg main- 
tained, which would result in the bet- 
terment of the whole community, 
could success be attained. 

"There is no business that 
doesn't depend upon having a 
healthy community — and no busi- 
ness that doesn't pay a heavy 
price if the community is not of 
that nature." 



The San Francisco Chamber of Commerce 

333 Pine St., San Francisco, 4 
EXbrook 4511 



DOMESTIC TRADE TIPS 



A digest of correspondence received from 
those desiring or offering lines of merchandise 
for representation. Inquiries are listed here as 
a service without necessarily bearing endorse- 
ment of the Chamber. For further details, 
contact the Domestic Trade Department, 
EXbrook 4511, Ext. 74. 

D-6023— GEORGE G. YYURLZRUGER, 
NOX-WEED, 3257 East Slauson Avenue, 
Los Angeles, 11, California, interested in find- 
ing distributor for Nox-Weed, a herbicidal 
spray. 

D-6024— E. L. FROST, THE INSTRU- 
MENT LABORATORY, INC., 934 Elliott 
Avenue, West, Seattle, 99, Washington, 
wishes to make contact with Western manufac- 
turers of electrical, mechanical or electronical 
instruments for the purpose of representing 
them on the Pacific Coast. 

D-6025— HARRISON MATHEWS, VICE 
PRESIDENT, ELECTRON EQUIPMENT 
CORP., 917 Meridian Avenue, South Pasa- 
dena, California, seeking distributor in this 
city for line of electronic equipment. 

D-6026— R. T. MATHIAS, MGR. EX- 
PORT DEPT., BRITISH LIQUID METER 
COMPANY, 605 West Washington Street, 
Chicago, 6, Illinois, wants to secure repre- 
sentation in this territory for their line of 
industrial felts and mechanical fabrics. 



FLASH ! 

• Louis B. Lundborg, general 
manager, San Francisco Cham- 
ber, has been elected to the 
Board of Governors, Western 
Institute for Commercial and 
Trade Association Executives at 
its annual session at the Uni- 
versity of Oregon, Eugene. 

• Also elected from the Bay 
Region were J. Delbert Sar- 
ber, general manager, Berkeley 
Chamber ; Russell E. Pettit, man- 
ager, San Jose Chamber; and 
John G. Rooks, secretary, Ala- 
meda Chamber. 




V W PUBLISHED BY THE 

SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 



Volume I 



Thursday, July 13, 1944 



Number 15 



WASHINGTON NOTES 



• Private construction throughout 
the United States is holding its own as 
programmed, while military and other 
public construction is declining ac- 
cording to schedule, the War Produc- 
tion Board has announced. 

Due primarily to the extremely 
tight position in lumber, total con- 
struction activity for the year is ex- 
pected to be only about $3,550,000,- 
000, or 46 per cent of the 1943, and 27 
percent of the 1942 volume. 

Private construction represented 
about 38 1 2 per cent in June as con- 
trasted with only 20 per cent in 
June, 1943. It is significant that 
the proportion of private to public 
construction is continuing to rise. 

• Postwar homes — The Director of 
the Bureau of the Census has pointed 
out that there has not been a decade 
since 1900 in which fewer than five 
million dwelling units have been built. 

Estimates by the Census Bureau in- 
dicate an increase in the number of 
families of approximately five million 
during the postwar decade. Thus, a 
building program of five million homes 
during that decade would not include 
replacement of obsolete structures, or 
make any gains against the tremen- 
dous backlog of existing demand . 

• A procedure has been established 
by the War Production Board under 
which a person who has excess ma- 
terials on hand may obtain permission 
to use such materials and products 
himself, rather than sell them under 
procedures for special sales. Permis- 
sion will be granted under the follow- 
ing circumstances: (1) If the intended 
use of the same materials were ac- 
quired through a special sale under 
Priorities Regulation No. 13, and 
(2) If the use of the materials in pro- 
duction in any one plant, or the labor 
requirements for that production, will 
not interfere with war production in 
that plant or in any other plant lo- 
cated in the same area. 

From the Chamber's Washington Office. 



"End Labor Stalemate" 
S. F. Chamber Wires to 
President Roosevelt 

"Metals Trades members of this or- 
ganization and this entire community 
are seriously handicapped as result of 
continued defiance of War Labor 
Board order by Lodge 68 Interna- 
tional Association of Machinists in- 
volving weekly hours of work by 
union members," according to a wire 
sent by the San Francisco Chamber to 
the President of the United States. 

"The San Francisco Chamber of 
Commerce urges such immediate 
steps as The President deems ad- 
visable to end stalemate and re- 
store productive capacity of plants 
which have been making vitally 
important contribution to the 
war effort." 

• In connection with labor con- 
tract negotiations between San Fran- 
cisco machine shop operators the 
union representing them put into 
effect a ruling prohibiting its members 
from working in excess of 48 hours a 
week. The ruling has resulted in an ex- 
tended controversy involving Regional 
and National War Labor Boards, both 
of which issued orders for cancellation 
of the work-week limitation. 



Extension of San Francisco 
Airport Underway at Present 

Work is now underway on extension 
of the prevailing wind runway at the 
San Francisco Airport and also on the 
fill for additional apron and parking 
space. 

• Contractors are the Macco Con- 
struction Company and Morrison- 
Knudsen Company. 

Day and night a steady stream 
of trucks is carrying fill material 
from hills north of Millbrae to the 
airport, using a new, direct road 
across the meadows. 



World Market for U.S. 
Gold, Urged by C. of C. 
for American Miners 

Benefits of the world demand for 
gold at prices greatly in excess of S35 
an ounce should be available to Amer- 
ican miners, according to a resolution 
just adopted by the Board of Direc- 
tors of the San Francisco Chamber on 
recommendation of its Mining Com- 
mittee. 

• George B. Dodge is chairman of 
the Committee, whose members in- 
clude representatives of large and 
small companies engaged in gold min- 
ing throughout the West. 

• Markets 

After noting that a market for gold 
bullion exists in India and North 
Africa, as examples, at prices in excess 
of the legal price in the United States 
and that the American government is 
supporting armed forces for the de- 
fense of countries where there is a 
great demand for gold, the resolution 
proposes procedure by the President 
of the United States and the State 
Department whereby both the Amer- 
ican government and domestic pro- 
ducers could obtain the benefits of the 
high gold prices. 

Support of the Chamber's posi- 
tion is being sought from all of 
the Congressmen of the Western 
States as well as various organiza- 
tions concerned with domestic 
mining industry. 

• Wartime conditions have brought 
many problems to American gold 
producers and it is believed that par- 
ticipation in the present world market 
for gold will help them defray exces- 
sive current costs and be prepared to 
afford important employment in the 
postwar period. 



Marsh, Here in August 

Frank E. Marsh, manager, San 
Francisco Chamber's Washington 
Office, will be in San Francisco for a 
brief stay during August. 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Thursday, July 13, 1944 



Chamber Stand on Monetary Plan 



New Yosemite Highway 
Discussed at Meet Here 

Possibilities of bringing Yosemite 
Valley 34 miles nearer to the Bay 
Region, via a new highway route ex- 
tending easterly from Modesto to 
Briceburg where it would connect 
with the All-Year Highway, were pre- 
sented by representatives of Modesto 
at a recent meeting arranged jointly 
by the San Francisco and Modesto 
Chambers of Commerce. 

• Engineering studies show that 
the Modesto-Yosemite Airline High- 
way would reduce the round-trip dis- 
tance by 68 miles. 

It was also pointed out that 
only 28 miles of new highway, 
costing approximately $1,750,000, 
were required to connect an exist- 
ing secondary highway with the 
All-Year Highway at Briceburg. 

• It was proposed that the State of 
California bear the cost for that por- 
tion not on Federal lands and that the 
balance be built by the Federal 
Government. 



Work Exchange Praised 

Attention of Personnel managers 
encountering difficulties because 
women employes have been obliged to 
quit or stay home on account of house- 
hold problems is called to the Neigh- 
bor's Work Exchange of the San 
Francisco Junior Chamber of Com- 
merce. 

"It is filling a real need, and I 
commend it to the attention and 
support of every San Francisco 
firm," Adrien J. Falk, San Fran- 
cisco Chamber President, declares. 



Attention, California Chambers ! 

According to information re- 
ceived from the Oakland Cham- 
ber of Commerce, Halvorfold- 
Kwikprint Co., with annual pay- 
roll of $50,000, wants location in 
a small California community. 

Chambers of Commerce 
should contact Olaf Halvor- 
sen, 605 West Washington, 
Chicago, 6. 

• Company name is Halvor- 
fold-Kwikprint Co. Leather 
goods and gold stamping equip- 
ment are manufactured by the 
firm. 



Tax Limitation Opposed by 
Chamber Board of Directors 

A constitutional limitation on fed- 
eral income, estate and gift taxes is 
opposed by the Board of Directors of 
the San Francisco Chamber of Com- 
merce, it was announced today by 
officials of the Chamber. 

• Although the Board opposed the 
limitation on tax rates for a variety of 
reasons it stated that the present tax 
rates are oppressive; that in time of 
peace the nation could not prosper 
under them; that they would be 
destructive of initiative and the in- 
centive to earn, and that they would 
make it impossible for individuals and 
corporations to retain funds necessary 
for progressive development. 

• Among the reasons for opposing 
the income tax limitation proposal the 
Board included the charge that such 
a limitation could hamper future prep- 
arations for war; that it would not 
preclude the raising of other types of 
taxes, such as corporate excise taxes 
and exorbitant capital stock taxes, to 
say nothing of preventing dollar de- 
valuation or levying payroll taxes at 
high rates. 

At the same time the Board an- 
nounced itself in favor of a state 
constitutional amendment allow- 
ing the legislature to fix the sal- 
aries of certain state officials. 



Pan American Airways 
Announces Expanded Services 

Pan American Airways System 
has announced inauguration of 
direct service to Curacao, N. W. I., 
and by transshipment thereat to 
Aruba and Bonaire. 
• The Airways also announced to 
shippers resumption of charges col- 
lect and C.O.D. services to the sys- 
tem's Airports in many of the islands 
and countries of Central America. 



Master Plumbers Association 

The Master Plumbers Association 
has announced transfer of its State 
office from Los Angeles to San Fran- 
cisco. 

• At the same time, Daniel Hayes 
of Security Plumbing Supply Com- 
pany of San Francisco, who is State 
President of the Association, was 
elected national president, Heating, 
Piping and Air Conditioning Contrac- 
tors Association. 



The following wire was sent by the 
San Francisco Chamber to Secretary 
of the Treasury Henry Morgenthau, 
Jr., at the United Nations Monetary 
and Financial Conference at Brctton 
Woods, New Hampshire: 

"Believing that an Interna- 
tional Stabilization Fund cannot 
of itself be permanently effective 
in stabilizing world currencies and 
believing that the fundamental 
basis for stability of currencies is 
a balance of exports and invisible 
receipts with imports, invisible 
payments, amortization require- 
ments and service charges on for- 
eign indebtedness, and a sound 
internal economy, country by 
country, the San Francisco Cham- 
ber of Commerce on July 6, 1944, 
enunciated the following declara- 
tion of policy on international 
currency stabilization: 

" 'International cooperation should 
be given by the United States favor- 
able to an early restoration of sound 
and stable currencies in the various 
countries engaged in world trade. 
Realizing the almost unsurmountable 
task of creating simultaneously the 
requisite conditions within the various 
countries conducive to external sta- 
bility of their currencies, we recom- 
mend that a loan be granted by the J 
United States to Great Britain. This 
loan, under adequate safeguards, 
would be for the purpose of exchange 
stabilization between the British 
pound sterling and the United States . 
dollar. A joint, progressive effort 
should then be made by Great Britain 
and the United States to facilitate 
sound currency programs of other 
nations as and when their internal 
economies are restored to a sound and 
stable basis.' 

"Simultaneously this Chamber 
of Commerce enunciated the fol- 
lowing declaration of policy on 
foreign loans: 

" 'In the interest of a lasting world 
peace, we favor American participa- 
tion in the reconstruction of the world 
and in the development of unde-j 
veloped areas. Our contribution will 1 
consist primarily of government and] 
private loans to other nations. Such] 
foreign loans as are made by the} 
United States Government, or itst 
agencies, to assist in this reconstruc-' 
tion shall be subject to constitutional) 
processes. Such loans should be ar-> 
ranged as far as possible on a self-} 
liquidating basis, and upon reasonable} 
(Continued on Page 4) 



rhursday, July 13,1944 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



State Office Located Here for 
Bay Region Postwar Activities 

In response to requests from the San 
Francisco Chamber and other organi- 
zations around the bay, Alexander R. 
Heron, director, State Reconstruction 
Bid Reemployment Commission, last 
week announced the establishment of 
| field office for the San Francisco Bay 
Region. 

• The office is being established in 
(he State Building in San Francisco 
and will serve as Bay Region head- 
quarters for the Director and other 
commission representatives. 

"This is very good news," com- 
mented Louis B. Lundborg, San 
Francisco Chamber general mana- 
ger. "It is especially gratifying 
that the office is Bay Regional in 
character, because the postwar 
problems of every community in 
the Bay Area are interrelated." 

Retailers' 5th War Loan 
Successes Discussed 

A round table discussion on the re- 
tailers' activities in the 5th War Loan 
was held in a broadcast over station 
KFRC, Wednesday, July 5. 

• The program was conducted by 
N. L. Bourgeault, chairman, Re- 
tailers' Division, War Finance Com- 
mittee, with Dave Street, managing 
director, Retail Merchants Associa- 
tion; Karl Stull, managing director, 
Retail Dry Goods Association; and 
Bob Willson, manager, California 
Chain Stores Association participating. 

They told of various instances in 
which the "Third Army" had 
proved successful beyond any 
other machinery set up to pro- 
mote sale of war bonds. 



Cotton Textile Industry Survey 
Planned at Bakersfield Meeting 



Women's "Work Pile" 
Dinner Meeting Set for 
Tuesday, July 18 

Progress on the Womens' "Work 
Pile" survey will be subject discussed 
at a dinner meeting in the Palace 
Hotel at 6:30 p.m., Tuesday, July 18. 

The dinner meeting is sponsored by 
the San Francisco Women's Round- 
table. 

Among the guests of honor at the 
"Work Pile" dinner will be Adrien J. 
Falk, president, San Francisco Cham- 
ber of Commerce; and Louis B. Lund- 
borg, general manager, San Francisco 
Chamber. 

Ralph Fallen of Navy Public Rela- 
tions will present the opinions of serv- 
icemen on such postwar preparations 
as the building of the San Francisco 
"Work Pile." 

Miss Marguerite Downing, presi- 
dent, Women's Roundtable, will pre- 
side at the dinner. 



Proposed New Air Service Here 

A. N. Kemp, president, American 
Air Lines, the nation's largest domestic 
air carrier, announced this week that 
his company made application to the 
Civil Aeronautics Board for permis- 
sion to operate its transcontinental 
and Mexican services directly into San 
Francisco. 

• Hearing on the application will 
not be held for some months. 



BAY AREA WAR HOUSING PROGRAM 

TOTAt WAR HOUSING PROGRAM FOR BAY REGION AS OF APRIt 30, 1944 



V J * s^ 




South 


San 
Francisco 












San 


San 


North 


Alameda 










Francisco 


Francisco 


Bay 


Oakland 


Richmond 


iSausalltn 


Total 


TOT AL -ALL TYPES: 
















Assigned 


.'M(,l 


2,507 


19,691 


22,919 


32,089 


3.710 


104.380 


Completed. 


15.081 


1.581 


17,202 


15,441 


27,034 


3,505 


79,844 


Yet to be completed 


8,38.1 


926 


2,489 


7,478 


5,055 


205 


24,536 


FINANCING 
















Privately financed. . . 


10,626 


1,469 


3,143 


9,695 


4,281 


748 


29,962 


Publicly financed 


12,838 


1,038 


16.548 


13,224 


27.808 


2,962 


74,418 


OCCUPANCY RATIO" 
















Private 


99 


98 r ; 


91'i 


99' , 


99', 


94 r ; 




Public 


7» % 


98<" c 


85^ 


84', 


87', 


76', 





•The occupancy ratio on privately financed war housing is computed on the basis of the number of units 
vhich the builders reported tu the Federal Housing Administration a> disposed of. The occupancy ratius 
>n publicly financed projects are based on all completed units upon which occupancy reports are available. 



Final plans for a detailed survey of 
conditions pertaining to the establish- 
ment of the cotton textile industry in 
California were developed at a con- 
ference in Bakersfield on July 6, ac- 
cording to G. L. Fox, manager, San 
Francisco Chamber's Industrial De- 
partment. 

• The proposed survey will be 
financed by Kern, Kings and Tulare 
counties, the survey program having 
been sponsored by the San Joaquin 
Valley Association of Commercial Or- 
ganization Secretaries. A committee 
of the Association has been working 
on the survey for some months and it 
is now expected that the actual survey 
will be launched within a few weeks 
under the direction of Ernest Nelson, 
Professor on Textiles, Engineering De- 
partment, University of Southern 
California. 

The facts which are developed 
will be used to attract the develop- 
ment of textile mills in California 
through the cooperation of indus- 
trial interests throughout the 
state. 

• Participating in the meeting at 
Bakersfield were representatives of 
the Industrial Departments of the 
Hanford, Los Angeles, Oakland, Sac- 
ramento, San Diego, San Francisco 
and Stockton Chambers of Commerce. 
Emory Gay Hoffman, Manager of the 
Kern County Chamber of Commerce, 
who is President of the SJVACOS, has 
been very active in the program to 
afford large employment in textile in- 
dustries in California. 

Colonel Alexander R. Heron and 
other representatives of the State 
Reemployment and Reconstruc- 
tion Commission also participated 
in the session, as well as repre- 
sentatives of cotton grower organi- 
zations and power and power 
equipment companies. 



Contract Termination 
School Ends Tomorrow 

Brigadier General F. M. Hopkins, 
chief, army air forces division of re- 
sources, will be final speaker tomorrow 
in the last day of the War Contract 
Termination school held in the San 
Francisco High School of Commerce 
since Tuesday of this week. 
• Other speakers tomorrow will 
discuss the settlement of fixed price 
contracts and subcontracts, and the 
practises and procedure of contract 
auditing in termination cases. 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Thursday, July 13, 1944 



FOREIGN TRADE TIPS 



The Chamber of Commerce cannot under- 
take to guarantee the financial standing and 
responsibility of any firm or individual men- 
tioned in TRADE TIPS, and it is suggested 
thatthe usual investigations be made in each 
instance. For further details regarding an 
item call the World Trade Department of the 
San Francisco Chamber of Commerce, EX- 
brook 4511, and refer to inquiry by the Trade 
Tip's number. 

3304 TRADE WITH MEXICO 

Distribuidora Leon, Avenida 16 de Septiembre 5. 
Despacho 214. Apartado de Correos 7301. Mexico 
D.F., Mexico, wants contact with manufacturers 
and exporters of general merchandise for their 
representation in Mexico. 

3305 LIQUORS FROM ARGENTINA 

Casimiro Polleda S.A.C.G.. Calle Alsina 2930- 
2934. Buenos Aires. Argentina, desires to be put 
in touch with importers of liquors who might be 
interested in buying gin, Pelayo cider. Galeon 
champagne, wines, liqueurs, etc., made in 
Argentina. 

3306 REPRESENTATION— PUERTO RICO 
Ernesto J. Goodman. P.O. Box 2774. San Juan. 
Puerto Rico, is interested in obtaining the repre- 
sentation of packers of sardines, fruits, garlic and 
vegetables. U. S. References are given. 

3307 EXPORTATION TO ECUADOR 
Armengol Aguilar Orellana. Casilla numero 796, 
Guayaquil. Ecuador, wants contact with manu- 
facturers and exporters of different products of 
textiles, bazaar and stationery articles, wheat 
flour, hardware products, novelties, etc., for their 
representation in Ecuador. 

S308 TOMATO JUICE 

Miguel B. Perellada, Apartado de Correos 831, 
Ciudad Trujillo. Dist. Santo Domingo. Republica 
Dominicana, is desirous to represent in that 
country exporters of paste and tomato juice in 
tins. Bank references supplied. 

3309 MEXICAN COMMODITIES 

Viverto Gomez Garduno, Calle Nayarit 83, 
Mexico D.F., Mexico, is interested in wholesale 
of Mexican silver jewelry and picturesque photo- 
graphs with Mexican motifs and desires contact 
with rirms interested in the buying of these 
articles. 

3310 ARGENTINE PRODUCTS 

Cabiro Hnos. y Cia.. Avenida de Mayo 1430. 
Buenos Aires, Argentina, seek contact with San 
Francisco importers of diverse products from 
Argentina. 

3311 CURIOS FROM TAHITI 

Teari a Taoutuarai Fils. Papeete. Tahiti 



South Sea Islands. He is in position to offer a 
large variety of objects made from carved pearl 
shell, woven mats, purses, etc. 

3312 SPICES 

Melchor D. Caballero, Calle Constitucion 506 
Sur, Apartado de Correos 160. Durango. Durango. 
Mexico, exports canary seed, laurel leaves, dry 
chili and wild marjoram. He also desires relations 
with importers and packers of these products. 

3313 WOODEN PENHOLDERS 

Compania Importadora y Exportadora de Jalisco. 
Calle Ocampo. numero 139. Guadalajara Jalisco. 
Mexico, wants contact with importers who might 
be interested in the buying of wooden penholders, 
made in Mexico. 

3314 LIQUORS FROM MEXICO 

Represent aciones Mundiales GAS. S. de R. L.. 
Avenida Juarez 56 Apartado Postal 2S72 Mexico 
D.F.. Mexico, is interested in the exportation of 
Mexican liquors such as tequila, habanero. vodka 
made from Mexcal spirits (no cane alcohol) and 
other similar products. 

3315 BUSINESS WITH URUGUAY 

S. Reches, Casilla de Correos 291. Montevideo. 
Uruguay, wishes to represent American manu- 
facturers in Uruguay. He is particularly interested 
in electric supplies, hardware, novelties, woolens, 
stationery, rayon and cotton yarns for industri" 



Mateo. California, represents manufacturers of 
all lines of general merchandise in territory and he 
is in position to export this merchandise for Pales- 
tine, Syria, Lebanon and Transjordana. Complete 
list of articles desired is available at the World 
Trade Department. 
3317 LUXURY GOODS TO CANADA 

Central Purchasing Agencies Ltd.. 57 Bloor Street 
West. Toronto. Canada, is anxious to make con- 
nections with San Francisco manufacturers and 
exporters of luxury goods, for handling their 
products in Canada. 



Position of Bay Region 
for Future China Trade 
Told by Ambassador 

Stating that San Francisco holds a 
position as gateway of America to the 
Orient and enjoys an historical associa- 
tion with China, Dr. Wei Tao-ming, 
Chinese ambassador in a speech be- 
fore the China-American Council of 
Commerce and Industry on July 7 in 
San Francisco, predicted that this city 
would occupy a most important posi- 
tion in the postwar development of 
the Asiatic republic. 

More Bay Area Directors of 
Western Institute Announced 

In addition to local chamber of 
commerce officials announced in the 
last issue of Bay Region Business as 
new members of the Board of Direc- 
tors of the Western Institute for Com- 
mercial and Trade Association Ex- 
ecutives, William E. Hammond, 
Western Division manager, U. S. 
Chamber of Commerce, was elected 
at the recent Western Institute ses- 
sions in Eugene, Oregon. 
• Bay Region Trade Association 
executives also elected are Miss Merle 
Brothers, Assistant Secretary, Retail 
Merchants Association, Oakland, and 
O. R. Mennenga, Assistant Manager, 
California Bankers Association. 



3318 TRADE WITH NICARAGUA 

Porfirio Perez hijo, 204 3a Avenida N.E., Mana- 
gua. Nicaragua, Central America, desires contact 
with distributors and exporters of chemicals, 
pharmaceuticals, biologicals. toilet preparations; 
also of oils, fats, resins, drugs, etc.. for their repre- 
sentation of these articles in Nicaragua. Bank 
references supplied. 



Published weekly at 333 Pine St., San Francisco. 
Zone 4, County of San Francisco. California. Will 
Williams, Editor. Telephone EXbrook 4511. Sub- 
scription, Fifty Cents a Year (Included in Annual 
Dues). Entered as Second-Class matter April_ 26, 



The San Francisco Chamber of Commerce 



333 Pine Street, 
EXbrook 4511 




A digest of correspondence received from 
those desiring or offering lines of merchandise 
for representation. Inquiries are listed here as 
a service without necessarily bearing endorse- 
ment of the Chamber. For further details, 
contact the Domestic Trade Department, 
EXbrook 4511, Ext. 74. 

D-6028— CARL F. SUTTON. 7621 South East 36th 
Avenue, Portland. Oregon, well acquainted in Alaska, 
desires San Francisco lines to sell there. 

D-6029— CLYDE G. LARSEN. 1315 Second East 
Street, Salt Lake City. 4, Utah, interested in securing 
the representatk 



i manufactured in this locale. 

D-6030— JOSEPH M. ROSENTHAL. CHARLES 
BLOCH COMPANY. Room 616. 833 Market Street 
San Francisco. 3, is seekine spi-ually lines for repre 
sentatinn in Northern and Central California. 



i for substantial local i 



International Monetary Plan 

(Continued from Page 2) 
commercial terms, to preclude the! 
onus of exploitation on one hand, orl 
sentimental considerations on thej 
other. Flotations of foreign loans inj 
the United States, in the form of bond I 
issues to be distributed to the public, 1 
should be made subject to the ap-l 
proval of the Securities and Exchange 1 
Commission, or similar United States | 
regulatory body.' 

"We respectfully submit these dec-] 
larations of policy to you with a yiewl 
to the foreign loan policy being given! 
consideration by the American delega- j 
tion and with a view to the interna-1 
tional currency stabilization policy! 
being given consideration by the con-1 
ferenceasa whole. 

San Francisco 

Chamber of Commerce 

Adrien J. Falk, 

President" 



Sec. 562 P. L. & R. 



Permit No. 1880 




*Su4we44- 



PUBLISHED BY THE 

SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 



Volume I 



Thursday, July 20, 1944 



Number 16 



WASHINGTON NOTES 



• The War Production Board has 

issued an official interpretation of 
Lumber Control Order, L-335, in the 
form of eighty-six questions and 
answers. Copies are available at the 
chamber office. 

• The small business committee 
of the senate would provide that 
small manufacturers would be given 
a head start to change over from war 
to peacetime production. In its recent 
report the committee urges that small 
distributors be safeguarded against 
cornered markets during the transi- 
tion period and recommends broader 
powers for the smaller war plants cor- 
poration with complete divorcement 
from the war production board. 

• Operators of commercial motor 
vehicles are warned by the office of 
defense transportation that the man- 
ner in which they operate and main- 
tain their vehicles in conformity with 
jood maintenance practices may be a 
Factor in determining whether or not 
they are entitled to new equipment. 

There continues to be evidence 
that many motor trucks and mo- 
tor truck tires are being abused 
and prematurely worn out by 
some truck operators even though 
the great majority of the opera- 
tors are doing a very good job of 
unserving their equipment, the 
3DT said. 

• Vice-Admiral Emory S. Land, 
:hairman of the United States Mari- 
ime Commission and war shipping 
idministrator has stated: 

"Military requirements for 
nerchant ships are increasing, 
rhe rising tempo of our mili- 
:ary and naval campaigns places 
greater burdens on the merchant 
leet for the transportation of men 
ind supplies to and in all theatres, 
rhere are no immediate "cut- 
>acks"or"reconversions" in pros- 
>ect for ship building or ship 
>perations. Our entire shipping 
sffort must be given to fulfill mili- 
:ary demands." 
"rom the Chamber's Washington Office. 



Editorial 

The sale of "E" bonds for San 
Francisco is 50 per cent behind the 
quota for this citv. With a goal of 
S77, 468,440, only $39,792,332 worth 
of "E" bonds have been sold so far. 

We, in this city, have always prided 
ourselves on our reputation as the 
"city that knows how." In peace 
time, we have been the city that 
knows how to be hospitable, to enter- 
tain, and to appreciate the arts, good 
food and gracious living. 

It's war time now — we must adapt 
our slogan to the nation's goal — win- 
ning the war. 

We must provide our fighting men 
with the materiel they need. Indi- 
vidual bond sales play a vital part in 
financing this war program. 

Many of you have already done 
your share. We are asking you to do 
a little extra — 

Buy "E" bonds in your own 
name, for your family, and urge 
your employees to join you in an 
all-out effort to prove conclusively 
that, in war or in peace, this IS 
the "city that knows how." 



Buyers Office Establishes 
Agency in San Francisco 

aed Merchandising Corpora- 
tion, buying organization for 20 of 
the nation's largest department stores, 
opened offices in San Francisco, Tues- 
day, July 18, at 442 Post Street, 
according to San Francisco Chamber 
Domestic Trade Department. 

This represents the sixth office 
established in the United States, 
the others being New York, Bos- 
ton, Chicago, St. Louis, and Los 
Angeles. 

Miss Edna Roland is Manager, San 
Francisco office. 

• The Emporium, H. C. Capwell's 
(Oakland) and Bullock's (Los An- 
geles) represent western stores serv- 
iced by this agency. 



Small Business Hearing 
by Senator Murray Set 
(or July 31 to August 1 

"As Chairman of the Special 
Senate Committee to Study the 
Problems of American Small Busi- 
ness, I am planning to hold con- 
ferences in the San Francisco Bay 
Region on July 31 and August 1 
for the purpose of meeting with 
representatives of industry and 
business and obtaining from them 
an expression of their views and 
plans for postwar reconversion." 

So says a letter received by Adrien 
J. Falk, President of the San Fran- 
cisco Chamber, from Senator James 
E. Murray of Montana. 

• Desires Information 
Inasmuch as Senator Murray de- 
sires to obtain expressions on prob- 
lems of small business, organizations 
which have not already arranged for 
representation at the conferences and 
desire to submit statements are urged 
to communicate with G. L. Fox, Man- 
ager of the San Francisco Chamber's 
Industrial Department — EXbrook 
4511. 

• Senator Murray says, "The im- 
mediate postwar problems of tax re- 
vision, prompt and orderly contract 
termination, protection of the thou- 
sands of small sub-contractors and 
the orderly transition of their facili- 
ties from a wartime to a peacetime 
production basis, will be thoroughly 
explored. A proper and adequate em- 
ployment compensation program is 
also under study. 

"It is my belief that this coun- 
try must maintain a very high 
standard of production if we are 
to provide jobs for our people, 
those now in industry and the 
members of our armed services, 
after the war." 

• Organizations desiring represen- 
tation at the hearing are advised that 
a comprehensive statement should be 
prepared by each spokesman for the 
record and a short synopsis made 
which can be read into the record. 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Thursday, July 20, 1944 



Furniture and Home Goods 
Market Week Starts July 24 



Three-Phase Program 
Launched by CofC On 
Contract Termination 

The chief steps taken by the San 
Francisco Chamber of Commerce re- 
cently to put all possible information 
on the termination of war contracts 
before contractors in the Bay Area 
are believed to have been highly in- 
strumental in obtaining the desired 
results. 

While probably the most significant 
of the three steps was the holding of 
the War Contracts Termination 
School from July 11 to 14 here in San 
Francisco, the bulletin on the subject 
sent out to contractors in June met 
with such approval that requests for 
many additional copies were received. 

Many of the requests for addi- 
tional copies have come from 
other Chambers of Commerce. In 
addition to those from St. Louis, 
Pittsburgh, New Orleans and sev- 
eral others, the Chamber of Com- 
merce of Portland has requested 
permission to reprint the entire 
bulletin for distribution to its 
membership. 



Street and Stull Named 
to Advertiser's Groups 

Karl Stull, managing director, Re- 
tail Dry Goods Association, and Dave 
Street, managing director, Retail Mer- 
chants Association of the San Fran- 
cisco Chamber of Commerce, have 
been elected division chairmen of the 
Local Advertisers Committee, Vic- 
tory Advertising Committee of the 
San Francisco Advertising Club. 

• Stull is chairman of the Retail 
Dry Goods Division. 

• Street is chairman of the Retail 
Merchants Division. 

In his letter of invitation, 
Harold R. Deal, chairman, execu- 
tive committee, said, "The local 
stores have done such a magnifi- 
cent job in support of the 5th War 
Loan that it would be a shame not 
to have this effective cooperation 
extended to other important war 
activities influential in our ulti- 
mate victory." 

JOIN U. S. Coast Guard, 

Volunteer Port Security Force, and 
PROTECT San Francisco's 

Busy War-time Waterfront! 



With the opening of the Fall Mar- 
ket Week lasting from July 24 to 29 
buyers of furniture and home equip- 
ment are coming to San Francisco 
from all over the West to acquire 
merchandise for their customers at 
the Western Merchandise Mart, it 
was announced today by the Domes- 
tic Trade department of the Chamber 
of Commerce. 

Fourteen thousand invitations 
have been extended to buyers 
throughout the trading area of 
the eleven Western States by the 
San Francisco Chamber of Com- 
merce. 

• Because of the wartime emer- 
gency the holding of such markets as 
these have assumed a greater impor- 
tance than ever before, according to 
Frank R. Runvan, president of the 
Mart. 

Centralized markets and mar- 
ket weeks perform a vital func- 
tion, Runyan says, especially to 
the smaller merchants. 

Furthermore, Runyan holds that 
such markets provide the most effec- 
tual means of coordinating the facili- 
ties and efforts of the industry in sup- 
plying the essential needs of civilians. 

• From August 6 to 10 a Fall Mar- 
ket Week for the Women's Apparel 
Trades will be held by the Manufac- 
turers and Wholesalers Association 
under the sponsorship of the San 
Francisco Chamber of Commerce. 

Fisher Announced Chairman 
Oakland C.E.D. Committee 

Ralph T. Fisher, vice president, 
American Trust Company, has been 
named chairman of the Oakland Com- 
mittee for Economic Development, 
according to an announcement by 
Joseph R. Knowland, chairman of 
CED for Alameda and Contra Costa 
Counties. 

Vice chairman of the committee is 
A.J. Bale. 

Mineral Bulletin 

State Mineralogist Walter W. Brad- 
ley of the Division of Mines an- 
nounces availability of Bulletin No. 
126, California Mineral Production 
and Directorv of Mineral Producers 
for 1942. 

The bulletin may be purchased 
from the State Division of Mines. 
Ferry Building, San Francisco, or 
State Office Building, Sacramento, for 
75 cents plus 2 cents sales tax for Cali- 
fornia residents. 



Tilton, City Planner, 
Outlines Plans for the 
Future San Francisco 

Postwar projects ranging from tide-f 
land reclamation to the construction 
of freeways and the redevelopment 
of the city's blighted areas formed the 
subject of a talk by L. Deming Tilton, 
city director of planning, at a luncheon 
given jointly by the San Francisco 
Chamber of Commerce and the Com-i 
mercial Club last Thursday in tha 
Club's dining room. 

Stating that the projects would: 
cost "large sums — staggering; 
sums" Tilton urged the necessityi 
of beginning them soon after thei 
war, and before it was indicated: 
that mass unemployment mighti 
again threaten. 

• The adoption and activation at 
the proper time of such plans, Tilton) 
held, would not only result in cushion- 
ing the effects of unemployment, bufli 
projects would have the virtue of: 
paying for themselves and yielding 
a profit through facilitating and stim- 
ulating the flow of trade through Satjr 
Francisco. 

Regarding the financing of the* 
projects, Tilton said that evenn 
though it might be necessary ton 
borrow the money to carry them 
out it would be well worth it. , 
Specifically he stated in this con-> 
nection, "borrowing money is 
merely bringing projects intc|o 
being now — like our Bay bridges— , 
instead of at some time in the 
distant future." 

• Among the projects especially 
urged were parking terminals, im- 
provements for rapid transit servicJJ 
new thoroughfares for safer access tat 
different parts of the city and a new 
bay bridge for the use ot trains. 



San Francisco Surveyed by 
Honolulu Chamber Official 

Clifford L. Stark, executive secret 
tary, Retail Board of the Chambei 
of Commerce of Honolulu, is in Sail 
Francisco making a survey of retail 
association operations and a studf 
of the financing and the details or 
organization of better business bull 
reaus. 

• Stark attended the Western In- 
stitute for Commercial & Trade Aa 
sociation Executives, which was helii 
in Eugene, Oregon, June 24 to July 1:1 

Stark's itinerary includes San' 
Diego, Los Angeles, Portland.! 
Eugene, San Francisco and Baj 
Area communities. 






BAY REGION BUSINESS 



The Philippines 



a 



A Special Report 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Thursday, July 20, 1944 



FOREIGN TRADE TIPS 



The Chamber of Commerce cannot under- 
take to guarantee the financial standing and 
responsibility of any firm or individual men- 
tioned in TRADE TIPS, and it is suggested 
that the usual investigation be made in each 
instance. For further details regarding an 
item call the World Trade Department of the 
San Francisco Chamber of Commerce, EX- 
brook 4511, and refer to inquiry by the Trade 
Tip's number. 



New York 4. N. Y., offer their 
farturers for shipment of their prod 
American and neu 



3320 EXPORTATION TO IRAQ 

The Orient Trading Corporation Ltd.. P.B. 90. 
26-32 Rewake Street. Baghdad. Iraq, is interested 
in the importation of cotton piece goods, sun 
goggles, radio and accessories, stationery goods, 
cinema equipment and hardware lines. 

3221 SARDINE PACKING MACHINERY 

Productos Cruz de Oro, Bolivar numero 374. 
Monterrey. Nuevo Leon, Mexico, seek contact 
with manufacturers of sardine packing machinery. 

3322 SPANISH LIQUORS 

Bodegas de la Vina "Pollero Alto," Apartado 
numero 11. Jerez de la Frontera. Spain, are in 
position to export to the United States, sherries 
; available at the World 



3323 TRADE WITH CUBA 

Cuban Products Corporation. Edificio Larrea, 
Apartamentos 31 7-18-19, Aguiar esq. Empedrado, 
La Habana. Cuba, desire to be put in touch with 
San Francisco importers of liquors, chocolates, 
, tapioca flour, etc. 



Orient. Akilli & Cie. P.B. 178, Alep. Syria, is 
interested in the importation of American prod- 
ucts of all kinds and wants to represent exporters 
of this merchandise. 

3325 BUSINESS WITH AUSTRALIA 

Lober Service Pty. Ltd. P.B. 3306 PP. G.P.O.. 
Sydney, N.S.W., Australia, seek contact with 
exporters of building equipment, tools, hardware 



•ing devices for the home. 



desires contact with San Francisco manufac- 
turers and exporters of foodstuffs, chemical and 
medical products, industrial raw materials, iron 



supplied. 

3328 POST-WAR BUSINESS 

Post-war representation of manufacturers and 
exporters of building materials, machinery and 
equipment, is sought by Mr. C. G. D. Butler. 
Director. Cooperative Brick Association. Temple 
Court. Collins Street. Melbourne, Australia. He 
can be reached at Stewart Hotel, San Francisco, 
until July 25. 

3329 CANNED COMMODITIES 

Martin Nussbaum, Edificio Agustin Nieto. Apar- 
tado Aereo 4257. Bogota. Colombia, wants to 
canned fruit 



Anyone interested may see a bulletin con- 
taining trade opportunities issued by the 
Brazilian Government Trade Bureau of the 
Department of Industrv and Commerce of 
Brazil, 551 Fifth Avenue, New York, N. V., 
now on file at the World Trade Department, 
San Francisco Chamber of Commerce. 



Published weekly at 333 Pine St., San Francisco. 
Zone 4, County of San Francisco, California. Will 
Williams. Editor. Telephone EXbrook 4511. Sub- 
scription. Fifty Cents a Year (Included in Annual 



foroia. under the act of March 3. 1870. 



Bay Region Men Appointed 
To Government Agencies 
Industry Advisory Groups 

The following Bay Region men 
were recently appointed to Industry 
Advisory committees of the Office of 
Price Administration and the War 
Production Board: 

• M. E. Wangenheim, president 
California Conserving Co., San Fran- 
cisco, has been appointed to the 
Pickle Industry Advisory Commit- 
tee, OPA. 

• Milo G. Spaich, American Forge 
Company, Berkeley, has been ap- 
pointed to the 'Open Die Forgings 
Advisory Committee, OPA. 

• W. J. McGuire, McGuire & Co., 
Emeryville, has been appointed to the 
Reconditioned Steel Drum Industry 
Advisory Committee, WPB. 



Special Notice 

• Effective July 15, 1944, freight 
rates on the National Railways of 
Mexico will be increased on import 
merchandise from the United States 
to Mexico, on both, less than carload 
and carload shipments, from about 
15 to 30 per cent, and on export mer- 
chandise from Mexico to the United 
States, on less than carload ship- 
ments and on some carload commodi- 
ties 100 per cent, but on most of the 
carload commodities only from about 
IS to 30 per cent. 

• Effective the middle of July, the 
New York and Cuba Mail S.S. Co. 
(Ward Line) will put in service a 
steamer and will accept freight for 
Veracruz and Tampico, and return 
cargo from these ports to New York. 



The San Francisco Chamber of Commerce 

333 Pine Street, San Francisco 4 
EXbrook 4511 



C of C States Federal 
Expenditures Policies 

An eight point statement of policy 
on Federal expenditures ranging from 
a recommendation limiting federal 
and state matching plans for the fi- 
nancing of certain projects to another 
urging that all local improvements 
should be paid for by local govern- 
ments, was passed by the San Fran- 
cisco Chamber Board recently. 

• The recommendations were ar- 
rived at after a consideration of the 
fact that income of the federal gov- 
ernment has exceeded outgo in only 
one year, 1937-38, since 1920, and 
that the federal debt, as of the end of 
the last fiscal year, is in excess of 
8206,000,000,000. 

These facts, in light of conserv- 
ative estimate for the national 
budget in the immediate postwar 
period set at $25,000,000,000 annu- 
ally, impelled the Board to its 
recommendations. 

• Following are the additional six 
points recommended: No public im- 
provements at taxpayers' expense un- 
less its current need is justified; pub- 
lic improvements to be restricted to 
such as are a necessary facility in the 
administration of government as dis- 
tinguished from activities in compe- 
tition with private enterprise; limita- 
tion of federal and state aid projects 
to those matters essential to general 
welfare or to matters made necessary 
by acts of government; approval of 
federal-state highway construction; 
immediate federal aid for veterans; 
placing of responsibility for postwar 
unemployment in war production cen- 
ters on federal government. 





*au tectum *Su4xMete- 

r J PUBLISHED BY THE 

SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 



Volume 



Thursday, July 27, 1944 



Number 17 



WASHINGTON NOTES 



• Construction activity in the United 
States during the first half of this year 
showed the first break in the long monthly 
series of decreases in evidence since August, 
1942, the War Production Board has an- 
nounced. The slight upturn of approximately 
3 per cent, which began in April, was due to 
mild seasonal increases in private construction 
as public construction continued its long de- 
While it is expected that this trend 

will continue through the early summer, 
seasonal factors and decreases in public 
construction will cause the downtrend to 
be resumed in the fall, WPB said. 

• The War Production Board has re 
leased a statement by Arthur H. Bunker. 
Vice-Chairman of the Production Executive 
Committee of the Board, outlining the pro- 
cedure by which the staff of the committee 
will handle cutbacks and other production 
adjustments so that there will be the least 
possible dislocation of employment and the 
greatest utilization of resources. 

The membership of the staff includes 
representatives of the War and Navy 
departments, the United States Mari- 
time Commission, various sections of the 
War Production Board, Smaller War 
Plants Corporation, and the War Man- 
power Commission. 

• WPB plans to merge its Gold and Silver 
Section with the Rare Metals Section and 
the Mercury Section, it has been announced, 
with Henry E. Stauss, of Millburn, N. J., 
now head of the Rare Metals Section, as the 
new chief. — From the Chamber's Washing- 
ton Office. 



"G. I. Bill of Rights" Copies 
Available at Chamber Offices 

Copies of the "G.I. Bill of Rights" (Pub- 
lic Law 346, 78th Congress, Servicemen's 
Readjustment Act of 1944) are now avail- 
able at the San Francisco Chamber of Com- 
merce. 

• Those interested may call or write Miss 
Marie Hogan, 333 Pine Street, Telephone: 
EXbrook4511. 



Small Business Hearing Here 
Set for July 31 and August 1 



Chamber Staff 100% 
"£" Bond Purchasers 



The San Francisco Chamber staff 
subscribed 100 per cent to extra bonds 
for "E" Day, according to an an- 
nouncement by Louis B. Lundborg, 
general manager. 

Bay Region Business (July 20) car- 
ried .an editorial asking businessmen to 
urge employees to join them in pur- 
chasing "E" bonds. 

"To practice what we preach, 
the Chamber staff was asked to 
sign up for that extra 'E' bond — 
and response was 100 per cent," 
Lundborg declared. 



New Bay Area Plant Result 
Kaiser-Standard Gypsum Deal 

A deal between the Henry J. Kaiser Com- 
pany and the Standard Gypsum Company 
announced on July 25, by which the entire 
building materials industry on the Pacific 
Coast will be vitally affected during the post- 
war period, will result in the establishment of 
at least one plant in the San Francisco Bay 
Area, Kaiser informed a San Francisco 
Chamber of Commerce representative early 
this week. 

9 In addition to that Kaiser announced 
that one of the new organization's biggest 
markets will be the Orient. 

In connection with this S. A. Perkins, 
president of the Standard Gypsum 
Company, said that postwar business 
between the new firm and the Orient 
would more than double the 50,000 tons 
that Standard shipped to the Orient in 
the last year before the war. 



Even if you do not testify, you are in- 
vited to attend conferences to be conducted 
on Monday, July 31, and Tuesday, August 1. 
in San Francisco by the Special Committee to 
Studv Problems of American Small Business 
of the U. S. Senate, according to G. L. Fox, 
manager, San Francisco Chamber Industrial 
Department. 

• Conferences will be held in Room 276 
(Judge Welch's Courtroom) of the Post Of- 
fice Building at 7th and Mission Streets from 
10 a.m. to 12 noon and 2 to 4 p.m. daily. 

Senator James E. Murray of Mon- 
tana will preside and it is expected that 
Senator Tom Stewart of Tennessee and 
Senator Kenneth S. Wherry of Ne- 
braska will be present. In preparation 
for the conferences, Alfred J. Van Tas- 
sell, staff director for the Committee, 
arrived in San Francisco last week. 

• From Washington, representatives ol 
the Interior Department, Department of Ag- 
riculture, Smaller War Plants Corporation, 
Defense Plant Corporation, War Manpower 
Commission, and War Production Board will 
be present to outline plans and views of these 
government agencies. 

• Others, in addition to representative busi- 
ness men who will testify, will include repre- 
sentatives of the State Re-employment and 
Reconstruction Commission, California State, 
San Francisco and Oakland chambers of com- 
merce, CIO and AFL. 

In anticipation of the conferences, 
the San Francisco Chamber, on recom- 
mendation of its Industrial Committee, 
is polling its entire membership on im- 
portant questions regarding govern- 
ment and "small business" policies. 



Back the Attack! 
BUY "E" BONDS 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Vacation Here is Theme for New 
Campaign to Reduce Travel 

"Bay Area People: Vacation Here 
This Year." 

That slogan has been decided upon as 
the 1944 victory vacation theme for San 
Francisco as a campaign to prevent unneces- 
sary travel gets underway, sponsored by the 
San Francisco Chamber of Commerce at the 
request of the Office of Defense Transporta- 
tion. 

• A meeting Monday, July 24, in the 
Chamber headquarters, 333 Pine Street, of 
city officials, civic organizations, service clubs, 
trade associations and labor officials charted 
campaign strategy. 

Representatives of the railroads and bus 
lines will join with the committee in exploring 
all means of making the campaign effective, 
particularly to induce San Franciscans to 
spend their vacations at or very close to home. 

"Make it a Bay Area vacation this 
year," says Chamber President Adrien 
J. Falk. "By not traveling you will aid 
the war effort and have a priceless op- 
portunity to explore the attractions of 
this beautiful city." 

An unprecedented transportation crisis has 
caused the ODT to make an urgent request 
that vacations this year be spent at home. 

Chamber President Falk pointed out 
that vacations in the Bay Area have un- 
limited possibilities for interest and rec- 
reation. "This will not only reduce rail 
and bus travel materially but will also 
benefit the city, its merchants and 
amusement enterprises." 



Western Crown Makes 
Progress on Purchase 
of New Factory Site 

Establishment of a large factory on the 
Bayshore Boulevard by Western Crown Cork 
& Seal Corporation has been facilitated by 
decision of the Board of Supervisors of San 
Mateo County to re-zone a portion of the 
proposed factory site to light manufacturing. 
• Re-zoning was previously recommended 
by the San Mateo County Planning Commis- 
sion, but due to protests by a few residents, 
the proposal was continued over to a hearing 
which was attended by San Francisco Cham- 
ber representatives. 

Western Crown Cork & Seal proposes 
to buy a site west of the Bayshore Boule- 
vard for construction of a factory on 
which millions of dollars will be expend- 
ed and which will employ 500 workers 
as soon as men and materials are avail- 
able, according to G. L. Fox, manager, 
Chamber's Industrial Department. 

The 33-acre factory site selected is in San 
Francisco and San Mateo counties. Part of 
the property in San Mateo required the re- 
zoning which the supervisors have now ap- 
proved. 

Property purchase for the factory will 
be completed when permits for spur 
track facilities are secured. 



Thursday, July 27, 1944 

PortChkagoOfferedAid 
by C of C in Expediting 
Community Rebuilding 

Assistance in facilitating rehabilitation of 
Port Chicago has been offered by the San 
Francisco Chamber of Commerce, according 
to an announcement by Adrien J. Falk, pres- 
ident. 

In a letter to Judge Otto Litchi, Port 
Chicago, Falk stated that the Chamber 
"is anxious to be of help to you and the 
citizens of your community in every 
way possible to expedite reconstruction 
work and to bring the Port Chicago area 
back to its high level of productiveness 
and service. 

"If the facilities of this office or our 
Washington Bureau can be of service to 
you, you have only to let us know and 
they will be placed at your command." 
• Copies of the letter offering Chamber 
assistance were sent to Honorable W. J. Bu- 
chanan, President, Board of Supervisors of 
Contra Costa County, Pittsburg, California, 
and Mrs. lone Booth, secretary, Contra Costa 
County Development Association. 



Appliances Clinic Held at Mart 

A two-day "diagnostic clinic" in which ap- 
pliance dealers and their service personnel 
will study latest methods of keeping home- 
vital electric appliances at work for the dura- 
tion is being held in the Green Room of the 
Merchandise Mart, today and tomorrow, 
Thursday and Friday. 



Foreign Economic Administration 



Based on studies and recommendations made by the Postwar Plan- 
ning Committee for Foreign Trade, a sub-committee of the San 
Francisco Chamber's Foreign Trade Committee, the Board of Direc- 
tors has now enunciated as Chamber of Commerce Policies the fol- 
lowing Declarations relating to the Foreign Economic Administra- 
tion (FEA) : 
1— POSTWAR LIQUIDATION OF FEA: 

All units of the Foreign Economic Administration should be liqui- 
dated as rapidly as possible after termination of hostilities. Any of its 
functions that may be proved useful to United States postwar com- 
mercial activities should be combined with foreign trade functions 
of the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce into one agency 
to operate as a part of the Department of State. The Department of 
State would then have two functions: one, diplomatic; the other, 
commercial. These functions should be blended for one common ob- 
jective: world trade promotion and protection within a system of 
free, private enterprise. 

2— WAR-TIME RELAXATION OF FEA FOREIGN 
TRADE CONTROLS: 

Import and export licensing procedure acts as a deterrent to for- 
eign trade. It is important to the future economy of the United 
States that marketing be interfered with only to the extent necessary 



for the war effort. Postwar trading must be released as rapidly as is 
practicable from all license control. It is necessary that FEA be so 
constituted as to abandon license control as and when changing cir- 
cumstances permit. 

Therefore, recommendation should be made to Congressional rep- 
resentatives that within FEA a unit be maintained for the purpose 
of receiving from the FEA Advisory Committees at periodic inter- 
vals control-relaxation recommendations, of studying the degree of 
need for export and import licensing, to the end that according to 
the commodity, the supply thereof, the country of origin and of des- 
tination, control shall be abandoned promptly in all instances where 
such may be done without adverse consequences to the war effort. 

3— FUTURE, PROGRESSIVE RELAXATION OF FEA 
CONTROLS: 

Because of shipping space shortage and shortage of supplies that 
could be spared from war production and lend-lease operations, for- 
eign traders willingly and cooperatively tolerated export and import 
licensing and other controls. As soon as materials, commodity by 
commodity, become in free supply, and shipping space, trade area 
by trade area, becomes adequate, it is urged that export and import 
licensing controls be relaxed, in the interest of the resumption of 
freely-flowing foreign commerce. 



Thursday, July 27, 1944 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS 



V J J J 



Thursday, July 13, 1944, the Board of Di- 
rectors of the San Francisco Chamber of 
Commerce met at the San Francisco Com- 
mercial Club. The following business was 
transacted: 

1. The board approved a recommen- 
dation that Chamber participation be 
confined to filing of a statistical exhibit 
in the case of Civil Aeronautics Board 
Docket No. 250 et. al. — the West Coast 
Case. 

2. The board voted to take no action 
on U. S. Chamber Referendum No. 82 
on Airport Policies because of a division 
of opinion among the membership. 

3. The board approved a recommen- 
dation that legislation be enacted to 
amend the Shipping Act of 1916 to fully 
regulate wharfingers, port authorities. 
and terminal operators. 

4. The board approved as Chamber 
policy recommendations by the Foreign 
Trade Committee in opposition to in- 
ternational cartels and in favor of an 
educational program on the importance 
of foreign trade. 

5. Mr. Arthur W. Towne reported on 
a successful visit to San Francisco by a 
delegation from the San Jose Chamber 
of Commerce and announced that the 
Domestic Trade Committee would be 
host to a committee from the Sacra- 
mento Chamber of Commerce on Au- 
gust 16. 

6. The Public Relations Department 
reported present Chamber membership 
at 4,607. 



Surplus War Properties — 

Tool Price Policies Told by Chief 



Standard Oil Man 
SpeakerOakland Lunch 

Howard R. Cuyler, general sales manager, 
Standard Oil Company of California, will be 
guest speaker at a luncheon sponsored by the 
Oakland Chamber of Commerce tomorrow, 
Friday, July 28, at the Hotel Leamington in 
Oakland. 

Cuyler will discuss the partnership of 
the oil industry in the future develop- 
ment of the East Bay counties. 

The luncheon is being held to welcome the 
new Oakland district sales office and staff of 
Standard Oil Company of California. 

Army Pre-induction Training 
Bulletin Announced 

The 9th Service Command has published 
a bulletin for the enlightenment and guid- 
ance of those who are about to be inducted, 
containing many hints about the settling of 
the inductees' personal affairs prior to induc- 
tion. 

• Interested members may see or borrow 
the San Francisco Chamber's copy of bulletin. 

7. Apricots grown by Mr. R. Vince 
Garrod, president, California Division 
of the Farmers' Union, at his ranch in 
Saratoga, were served to members of the 
Board, and Mr. Garrod gave a brief 
account of the importance of apricot 
growing to California agriculture. 



U.S. WAR EXPENDITURES 



MILLIONS OF DOLLARS 

350 



DAILY RATE 



300 
250 
200 
150 
100 
50 



MILLIONS OF DOLLARS 

350 



JAN 


UARY 1941- JU 


NE 1944 





















































300 
250 
200 
150 
100 
50 



JFMAMJJAS0NDJFMAMJJAS0NDJFMAMJJAS0NDJFMAMJ 

1941 1942 1943 1944 



According to an announcement received by 
the Chamber's Industrial Department, Wil- 
liam L. Clayton, Surplus War Property Ad- 
ministrator, has established a price policy for 
disposal of government surplus used general- 
purpose machine tools which will be of great 
interest to current and prospective users of 
such equipment and which is one of the first 
indications of SWPA pricing methods. 

• The schedule reflecting the policy has 
two bases: when tools are not in the purchas- 
er's plant, they are sold with an immediate 
depreciation of 15 per cent, less 2!' 2 per cent 
per month for the first six months, 1 per cent 
per month for the next four months, and 
eight-tenths of 1 per cent per month for the 
next 26 months. When tools are sold to a pur- 
chaser or lessee who has the tools in his own 
plant, the price is five points higher than the 
preceding formula. The five-point difference 
-S said to arise from the fact that a purchaser 
of tools in his own plant not only has knowl- 
edge of their condition, but is under no neces- 
sity of paying freight charges. 

The administration says: 

"The depreciation price policy is 
based on the machine tool manufactur- 
er's original price, inclusive of electric 
equipment and standard accessories, f. 
o. b. builder's plant. The price to the 
buyer is f. o. b. cars or trucks at storage 
location. Tooling is available for pur- 
chase at the customer's option on the 
above depreciated price formula. 

"The depreciation price period is 
fixed from the date a machine was orig- 
inally put in use (actual or estimated) 
to the date of termination of the 
lessee's facilities contract, or to the time 
the machine is withdrawn from con- 
tract, placed in storage, or sold (which- 
ever is earlier)." 

Under the preceding formula the new 
price of equipment in use for 12 months 
would be 64.4 per cent or 69.4 per cent of the 
original price; 24 months, 54.8 per cent or 
59.8 per cent; 36 months, 45.2 per cent or 
50.2 per cent. 



Transcript Available 

An indexed transcript of all presentations 
— both talks and questions and answers given 
at the termination training course — has been 
made by the Stanley J. Mansfield Enter- 
prises, 333 Montgomery Street, DOuglas 
8377. 

Transcripts, available in 10 days, checked 
by procurement agencies, will cost not more 
than S7.50. 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Thursday, July 27, 1944 



FOREIGN TRADE TIPS 



of Commerce cannot undertake 



>sponsibility 
n TRADE 



The Chambi 
guarantee the financial sti 
of any firm or individual 
TIPS, and it is suggested that the usual investi 
tion be made in each instance. For further det 
regarding an item call the World Trade Dep. 
ment of the San Francisco Chamber of O 
EXbrook 4511, and refer to inquiry by the Trad. 
Tip's number. 

3330 MEXICAN TRADE 

International Business Co., S. of R. L., Ma 
dero 54, Suite 308, Mexico D. F„ Mexico lie 



American couu- 

33 31 PLASTIC GOGGLES 

M. & R. Plastic Products Company, II Jo \\ . 
Olympic Blvd., Los Angeles 25, California, 
manufacturers of all plastic safety eye protec- 
tors, is interested in selling these articles in for- 
eiga markets. 

3332 MACHINERY FOR SHOES 

Alberto Heres Z., Panama, Republica de Pan- 
ama, wants to buy machinery for making wom- 
en's shoes, and also materials and accessories 
for the fabrication of shoes, 

3333 REPRESENTATION IN MEXICO 

i 'ki. Transcontinental de Comercio, S. de R. L. 
de V. C, Paseo de La Reforma 12, Despacho 
611, Mexico D, F-, Mexico, is desirous to rep- 
resent American exporters and importers of all 
kinds of products in Mexico and Central Amer- 

3334 TRADE WITH TUNISIA 

M. Scetbun, Rue Maillot 5 Bis, Case Postale 
54, Tunis, Tunisia, wants connections with San 
Francisco manufacturers and exporters for 
their representation in Tunisia. 

3335 EXPORTATION TO ECUADOR 

Mauri Hnos., Apartado postal 117, Calle Bal- 
len 817, Guayaquil, Kcuador, desire to import 
second-hand machinery. 



ebuilt i 



eltit 



ish Guiana, is interested 

is available at the World Trade 



CURIOS FROM TAHITI 
Tai Ping, Rue Du 22 Septembre. P. O. Bo 
242. Papeete, Tahiti, wants to be put in touc 
i of different curios from Tahit 



, Ausi 



COMMODITIES FROM ARGENTINA 
Cia. Argentina de Exportation, S. R. L., Calle 
Bulnes 1877, Buenos Aires, Argentina, desire 
contact with importers of dairy products, 
canned meat, animal fat, dried fruits, vege- 
tables, etc.. and liquors. 
JEWELRY AND CURIOS 
l». L. \Y. I.eiris. 286 B. WackweUa Road, 
GaJle, Ceylon, seeks connections with San 
Francisco importers of diverse jewelry articles, 

REPRESENTATION IN CHILE 
Santiago Pacific Kxpurt Sue. Ltda., Bandera 
60, 2o Piso, Oficina & Clasificador 528. Santi- 
ago, Chile, is interested in the representation of 
San 1- "ranci$o> manufacturers and exporters of 
various kinds of products. 
GENERAL MERCHANDISE 
H. L. Tealdo. Avenida Grau 144, Apartado 
Postal 1876, Lima, Peru, wants to represent 
San Francisco manufacturers and exporters of 
all classes of merchandise, with the exception 
of chemicals, raw materials, and machinery. 
SISAL BAGS 

Em. Wallon, P. O. Box A-69, Port-Au-Prince, 
Haiti, desires to export sisal bags of different 
sizes, in multicolored rainbow and pastel de- 
signs. 

MEXICAN LIQUORS 

Cia. Vinicola "Etna" S. de R. L.. Avenida 
Chapultepec, numero 123. Colonia Niiios He- 
roes, Mexico D. F., Mexico, is anxious to en- 
tact San Francisco importers of Muscatel wine, 
Oporto, Terez, Russian vodka, etc. 
REPRESENTATION IN CANADA 
McKendry's Sales Agency, 2215 Queen Street 
East, Toronto. Canada, wants to represent San 
Francisco manufacturers of druys. baby and 
novelty lines, in Canada. 
PRODUCTS FROM TAHITI 
"Vahine," Papeete, Tahiti, is in position to ex- 
port a gre.,( variety of Polynesian airu^itic* 
and all types of Tahitian articles. Price? and 
references are available at the World Trade 
Department. 



Board Gets "Taste" of 
California Production 

Directors of the San Francisco Chamber 
have made it a practice to invite members of 
the Agricultural Committee to Board meet- 
ings to enlighten them on different phases of 
California's agricultural industry. 
• Last week, R. Vince Garrod, presi- 
dent, Farmers Educational and Cooperative 
Union of America, California Division, gave 
an illustrated talk on his crops. 

Garrod is a large grower of prunes 
and apricots — and for dessert at the 
Board luncheon, directors were served 
fresh apricots from Garrod's ranch. 



FOREIGN TRADE TIPS-&»w 

3346 EXPORT FOR MAURITIUS. REUNION, 
MADAGASCAR 

Ernest Baumann. Bach & Bauinann. 313 
Grove Street, Berkeley, California, with cot 
nections in Mauritius, Reunion and Madaga: 
car, desire^ manufacturers" lines for represent; 
tion in those Indian Ocean islands. 

3347 AUSTRALIA-NEW ZEALAND TRADE 
CONNECTIONS 



official 



bus: 



September. Mr. Keith F. 
Dureau, of Browne and Dureau Pty. Ltd., 434 
Collins Street, Melbourne. Australia (branches 
throughout Australia and Xew Zealand), is de- 
sirous of appointments being scheduled now for 
representation interviews with importers, ex- 
porters and manufacturers, with particular in- 
terest in machinery equipment. Mr. Dureau 
may now be contacted: care of Otto Gerdeau 
Co.. 82 Wall Street. Xew York, X. Y 
3 348 SURPLUS WAR MATERIALS 

Simbaldi & Company, 420 Market Sitr.i, San 
Francisco 11, California, are interested in any 
kind of surplus war materials. This company 



also seeks 



creasing expo 



interested in developing or 
sales on commission basis 
and Other world markets m 



Published weeklj at 133 Pine St., San 


Francisco, 


Zone 4, County of San Francisco. 1 alif' 


rnia. Will 


Williams, Editor. Telephone EXbrook 


511. Sul>- 


scription, Kiftv Cents a Year ( Included 


n Animal 


Dues). Entered as Second Class mattei 


April 26, 


1944, at the Post Office at San Franc 


sco. Cali- 


lornia under the act ol March 3. ism. 





The San Francisco Chamber of Commerce 

333 Pine Street, San Francisco 4 
EXbrook 4511 



War Bond "Generals" 
From San Joaquin 
Entertained Here 

The highest ranking War Bond Generals 
of the "Third Army" from the San joaqum 
Valley were brought to San Francisco as 
guests of the Women's Naval Reserve re- 
cently. 

• "Third Army" Generals' tour in- 
cluded a visit to Oak Knoll Naval Hospital, 
Alameda Naval Air Station, and Treasure 
Island. 

War Bond Generals who made the tour in- 
cluded: Norine Steinam and Emma Linde- 
man of Visalia; Robbin Burr, Wanda Mc- 
Kenzie, and Mrs. Peggy Downerd of Han- 
ford and Avenal; Mrs. Vera Hegg, Mrs. 
Loda B. Shephard, Mrs. Elsie D. Tripp, and 
Mrs. Mary Bibb of Fresno; Margaret Cec- 
carelli of Dos Palos; Mrs. Clara Searcy of 
Dinuba; Mrs. Ethel Rucher and Mrs. Mamie 
Rahilly of Merced; May Simon of Turlock; 
Mrs. M. L. Wilkinson of Modesto; Mrs. 
Norma Steed, Miss Margaret Zeeter, Mrs. 
Olive Grimsley, and Mrs. Elsie M. Sangui- 
netti of Stockton. 



"Parking Reservoirs' 1 Wind 
Up Cof C- City of Paris Exhibits 

An exhibit of projected parking reservoirs 
for San Francisco, sponsored by the City j 
Planning Commission, which would enable 
out of town visitors to obtain parking space 
within five minutes of any particular down- 
town shopping district or business building 
will be on display for a week, starting July 29 
in a City of Paris display window. 

• This is the last in a series of ten exhibits 
sponsored by the San Francisco Chamber of 
Commerce. 





<2# Beaton ^>c<Ai*tete, 

* W PUBLISHED BY THE 



SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 



Volume 



Thursday, August 3, 1944 



Number 18 



Business Activity Edition 



Thumb Nail Sketch 

The Research Department 

San Francisco Chamber 

of Commerce 

• More than one-half million mi- 
grants from all parts of the United 
states came into the San Francisco 
Bay Area between April 1940 and 
^pril 1944. Of these, 16.7 per cent 
:ame from States east of the Missis- 
sippi River, 19 per cent from the 
Southwestern States of Oklahoma, 
rexas, Louisiana, and Arkansas, 14 
3er cent from the West North Central 
states of Missouri, Nebraska, Kansas, 
Iowa, Minnesota, and the Dakotas, 
ind 36.1 per cent from the Pacific 
roast of which 20.2 per cent were 
rom Northern California, 11.1 per 
:ent from Southern California, and 
1.8 per cent from the Washington- 
Oregon area, with the remaining ema- 
lating from the balance of the States, 
according to the U. S. Census. 

In-migration and the employ- 
nent of housewives not normally 
n the labor force have brought 
he Bay Area (five Counties) war- 
ime civilian labor force to 834,700 
is of May 1944 compared to 552,- 
iOO in April 1940. At the same 
ime, additional thousands from 
his area have entered the Armed 
•"orces. 

> The greatest employment bulge 

iccurred in shipbuilding and other 
vartime manufacturing industries, 
ifting the ratio of the employed in 
he manufacturing group from 21 per 
:ent to nearly 37 per cent of the total 
mployment, and raising the number 
>f persons in this group in May 1944 
o 306,200, or nearly 200,000 above 
he 1940 level. 

Although this is a major factor re- 
ated to most all post-war planning for 
his area, it is reasonable to assume 
hat of this group more than one-half 
rould be diffused to the trade and 
ervice activities under normal peace- 
ime operations and ratios, as is re- 



vealed by the following comparisons 
of the gainfully employed in the Bay 
Area (five Counties) in 1940 and dur- 
ing the current year based on the 
State Department of Industrial Rela- 
tions' recent report : 

May 1944 April 1940 
Activity Per Cent Per Cent 

Manufacturing 36.68170.47 20.71l69.97 

Trade and Service 33.79/ 49.26/ 

Government 13.90 9.32 

Transportation. Communica- 
tions & Related 9.34 10.77 

Construction 3.59 5.27 

Agriculture 1.98 2.77 

Mining 0.14 0.24 

Not Reported. 0.58 1.66 

• Bay Area June bank debits, bol- 
stered by a strong increase in San 
Francisco, established a new all-time 
monthly high of §2,344,187,000 and 
were 22 per cent above last June. The 
half-year total of 812,536,030,000 sur- 
passed the similar period last year by 
one and three-quarters billion dollars, 
or 16.3 per cent. 

• New war contracts and project 
orders, reported bv W.P.B. placed in 
the Bay Region during the April-May 
period, amounted to 863,867,000. 
However, due to some change in gen- 
eral supply contracts, the net gain was 
only S34,004,000 and carried the cu- 
mulative during the war period for 
the Bay Area to 84,556,504,000. May 
supply contract awards included $31,- 
031,000 for ordnance, 818,386,000 for 




ships, and $8,825,000 for aircraft. Mav 
project orders amounted to S2, 996, 000. 
New industrial facility contracts re- 
ported for April amounted to S2.629,- 
000. Cumulative supply contracts 
through May amounted' to 83,032,- 
173,000, ships accounting for S2.502,- 
484,000, ordnance for 8105,722,000, 
aircraft for 812,252,000, and all other 
for S41 1,715,000. Project orders cu- 
mulative through May amounted to 
S864,698,000. Facility contracts cu- 
mulative through April of 8659,633,- 
000 included industrial of 8364,350,- 
000 and military of 8295,283,000. 

• June payrolls in the manufactur- 
ing industries (five Counties) were off 
4.2 per cent compared to last June, 
but the cumulative for the first half 
of the year was 3.8 per cent above a 
year ago. Average hours worked in 
June amounted to 45.2, average 
weekly earnings to 860.56, and aver- 
age hourly earnings to 81-339 com- 
pared to 44.2 hours, S56.63 and SI. 282 
respectively in June last year. June 
wage earners totaled 248,100 of which 
196,200 were in the durable group and 
51,400 in the non-durable. 

• June retail department store 
sales in the Bay Region were up 7 per 
cent over last June with the 6 months' 
cumulative also up 7 per cent. In the 
12th District sales were up 5 per cent 
in June and 7 per cent for the cumu- 
lative period. 

The Central Valley showed gains 
of 9 per cent and 12 per cent; 
Fresno 18 per cent and 29 per cent; 
Stockton 8 per cent and 9 per 
cent; Sacramento 6 per cent and 
6 per cent; Vallejo 18 per cent and 
15 per cent; Santa Rosa 16 per 
cent and 13 per cent; San Jose 10 

(Continued on page 2) 



SPECIAL NOTICE 

Alembership Meeting 
Announcement 

Page 2 — Column 3 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Thursday, August 3, 1944 



Bay Area Vacation Plans 
Announced by Travel 
Conservation Committee 

Plans for vacations at home to in- 
clude visiting of local historical spots, 
hikes, picnics, sports events, parties 
and exhibits were being developed to- 
day by the Travel Conservation Com- 
mittee of the San Francisco Chamber 
of Commerce as a means of keeping 
railroads and buslines free for the flow 
of military and naval traffic to and 
from Pacific Coast ports during the 
summer months. 

"The cooperation of San Fran- 
cisco vacationists is imperative at 
this time as the offensive against 
Japan intensifies," said Adrien J. 
Falk, president of the Chamber, 
who stated that detailed plans for 
interesting two week vacations in 
the Bay area would be released 
shortly as suggested by the Travel 
Conservation Committee. 



Business Activity 

(Continued) 

per cent and 10 per cent; and Los 
Angeles area 7 per cent and 11 per 
cent. 

• Trade at wholesale on the Pacific 
Coast based on 244 reports to the 
Census Bureau was up 7 per cent in 
May and 4 per cent for the 5 months' 
cumulative compared to similar peri- 
ods last year. 

• General business activity in San 
Francisco during the first six months 
was 13.9 per cent above last year. Our 
index established a new high for June 
at 192.9 compared to 173.0 (revised) 
in May and 163.3 in June last year. 

• Carloadings in the San Francisco- 
Oakland Switching Limits during 
June were up 4.7 per cent over last 
June while the 6 months' cumulative 
of 397,413 cars was up 9.1 per cent. 

• At the end of the first half of 
1944 in San Francisco, real estate sales 
were up 47.4 per cent in number and 
74.5 per cent in value; construction of 
new single-family dwellings rose 22.5 
per cent in number and 33.1 per cent 
in value; postal receipts gained 136.7 
per cent; bank debits 17.3 per cent; 
market value of transactions on the 
San Francisco Stock Exchange 20.7 
per cent; electrical energy sales 16.6 
per cent; industrial and commercial 
gas sales 12.9 per cent; San Francisco 
plane traffic 24.8 per cent and pas- 
senger traffic 24.2 per cent; air mail 
loaded 115.9 per cent; total place- 
ments 14 per cent and industrial 
placements 19.8 per cent. 



FALK HONORED 




"I want to get the right man." 
—Mayor Lapham. 

Adrien J. Falk, president, San Francisco 
Chamber of Commerce, has been appointed 
by Mayor Lapham to the San Francisco 
Board of Education, subject to confirmation 
of voters, for term beginning Jan. 8, 1945. 



Navy Supply Depot 
To Be Built at Stockton 

Approval of S20,000,000 appropria- 
tion for initial establishment of a navy 
supply depot near the deep water 
port of Stockton was announced last 
week by Representative Leroy John- 
son, Stockton. 



Women's Apparel Market 
Week, August 6 to 10 

Women's Apparel Market Week, 
first showing of Fall lines in Ready- 
to-Wear and Millinery, will be held 
starting Sunday, August 6 to 10, ac- 
cording to the Manufacturers and 
Wholesalers Association of San Fran- 
cisco. 

New San Jose Factory 

General Electric Company an- 
nounced last week that it is purchas- 
ing 57 acres at San Jose for a modern 
manufacturing plant. 

• Cost of Living items in San Fran- 
cisco during June were 0.4 per cent 
above last June with the six months 
average 1.1 per cent above last year. 
Food costs declined 1.5 per cent com- 
pared to May but house furnishings 
rose 13.6 per cent. 



Marsh to Report to 
Chamber Membership 

Frank E. Marsh, manager, San 
Francisco Chamber's Washing- 
ton Office, will report to the 
Chamber membership at a gen- 
eral meeting, Thursday, August 
10, at 3:30 p.m. in the Pacific 
Gas & Electric Co. auditorium, 
245 Market Street. 

• All Chamber members are 
invited to attend and hear first- 
hand from Marsh an analysis of 
recent Washington develop- 
ments and current status of 
measures affecting San Francisco 
and the Bay Region in the Na- 
tion's Capital. 

Marsh will outline wartime 
and postwar problems of the 
Bay Region and Pacific Coast 
as seen from Washington and 
will point updevelopmentsre- 
quiring action or clarification 
by the people of this region 
for guidance of federal legis- 
lation. 

Also described will be opera- 
tions and services of the Cham- 
ber's Washington Office and its 
accomplishments during five 
months of operation. 

• While here, Marsh will ad- 
dress a number of other San 
Francisco civic and service or- 
ganizations. 



Treasury Dept. Reports 
Surplus Items Available 

Anyone eligible to purchase and I 
interested in the following articles' 
should get in touch with the Procure- 
ment Division, Treasury Department, 
30 Van Ness Avenue, HEmlock 1922.. 

1. 8488 used trucks of various types- 
for sale to farmers, oil companies, 
fruit growers, and other essential users. 
1563 are good only as salvage. 

2. 2185 five-man pneumatic life' 
rafts to be sold to eligible in-the-trade 
wholesalers and retailers. 

3. A large quantity of 55 gallon 
metal drums being offered to farmi 
cooperatives, oil companies, and in- 
the-trade distributors. 

NOTICE ! 

Waste Paper Salvage DRIVE 

Building Pickup: Throughout month of 

August. 
City-wide Home Pickup: Sunday, 

August 13. 



Thursday, August 3, 1944 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



SURVEY OF BUSINESS CONDITIONS 
IN SAN FRANCISCO 



BRANCH OF ACTIVITY 



Residential. Xew 

Single-family Dwelling?, New 

Non-residential, Xew 

Additions. Alterations & Repairs 
Installations 



Mortgages & Deeds of Trusl 
Releases 



(number) 

value 

. (number 

(value) 

(number) 

(value) 

.(number) 

(value) 

.(number) 

(value) 

. (number) 

lvalue) 

(number) 

(amount) 



FINANCE 

Bank Debits . . - 
Bank Clearings 



COMMERCIAL FAILURES 

Liabilities . 

Assets 



EMPLOYMENT & PAYROLLS— Bay Area (5 Co. 's) (a) 

Employment (manufacturing) (Index) 

Payrolls (manufacturing i (Index) 



Wholesale Trade 
Retail Trade 

Hotels.. 



. ( Payroll 
(Payroll) 
(Payroll) 

PLACEMENTS IN SAN FRANCISCO— I". S. E. S. 

Industrial Placements ... (number) 
Commercial Placements (number) 

TRANSPORTATION 

Carloads 

S. F. Airport Traffic. 



Express Shipment 
Air Mail Loaded. 



. . .(number) 
. (no. planes) 
i. passengers) 
. . (number) 
. (number) 
. . . . (pounds) 



Indus. & Com'l Gas Sales 



Tourist & Settler Inquiries 



(cu. ft.) 

. (net gain) 

(number) 



DAIRY RECEIPTS, FRUITS & VEGETABLES 

Butter (pounds) 

Cheese. .(pounds) 

Eggs . .(cases) 

Poultry'. Dressed. . (pounds) 

Fruits & Vegetables (carlots) 



LIVESTOCK SLAUGHTER ibj 
Cattle... 

Sheep & Lambs 
Hogs 



(total number) 

(number) 

(number) 
(number) 



uber 



S. F. LIVING COSTS 1935-39 Avg. = 100 

Food (Index) 

Clothing (Index) 

Kent I lnde.tj 

Fuel and Light Index) 

House Furnishing Goods i.Index,' 

Miscellaneous (Index) 

All Items (Index) 



12.840 

1.180 

11.136.821 

1.122 

8. 067. 353 

1.189 

7.631.724 

165 



1.843.336 
1.279.821 
2.359.114 
606.917 
10.745.155 

1 



152.1 
141.3 
129.5 
180.8 



29,723 

1.649 

22 (73 

289.423 

7.142 

7S1.591 



1 032 792,800 



5.891 819 

1.768.096 

214.938 

2.096.385 

2.390 



17.416 
124.054 
60.226 



142.5 
(c) 135.0 
(c) 106.0 



266 


15.4 


677.399 


-24.4 


120 


-53.3 


362.500 


-43.6 


120 


-S5.8 


362.500 


-46.0 


6 


-16.6 


17.950 


-80.9 


114 


35.1 


296.299 


-1.8 


6 


983.3 


650 


1875.3 


823 


43,4 


7,725.220 


53.2 


911 


22.9 


6.041,884 


33.5 


1.036 


14.8 


6.212.480 


22.8 


153 


7.9 


1.471.867 


25.2 


1.080.093 


18.5 


1,281.766 


S4.1 


443.826 


36.7 


6.580.038 


63.3 



149.5 
133.1 
1304 
156.3 

9.153 

8.102 
1.051 



14.787 

252.110 

6.594 

315.175 



937.882 KM 



6.S74.S69 

3.774.913 

13*674 

493.949 

2.306 

207,986 
25.218 
6.784 

125.414 
50.570 



149 S 

127.5 
106.0 
92.2 
119.0 
123.2 
128.7 



33.9 
36.0 
17.5 



36.5 
51.3 
14.8 



-14.3 
-53.2 
64.5 

324.4 



65.100 

6.477 

59.185.826 
6.418 

44.862.959 
7.087 

45.855.693 



17.085.116 
3.011.269 
4S.606.592 



150.9 
141.4 
128.2 
181.7 

65.158 
58.240 
6.918 



183.864 

8.723 

103.124 

1.714.255 



21.561.181 

6.602.650 

973.178 

13.664 481 

10.929 

1,252.308 
195.514 
63.580 
559.830 

432.384 



(d) 106.1 
(d) 92.4 
(d) 120.9 
ic 1 ) 126.3 



7,590 

4.394 

33.924.629 
4.864 

30.223.892 
5.931 

37.370.41S 

151 



8.277.167 
6.175.995 
7.218.354 
3.014316 
40.263.S23 



13 



150.3 
128.6 
127.4 
148.5 

57.141 
48.612 
8.529 



168.750 

6.992 

S3.035 

1.520.858 

41.892 

1.833.957 



4.792.879.500 



29.302.164 

11.077.400 

694.402 

8.214.935 

10.734 

1.088.950 
139.278 
23.887 
640.649 

2S5.137 



145 4 
127.1 
105.3 
92.5 
119.0 
121.7 
126.8 



(a) These data are based on reports submitted to the Division of Labor Statistics and Law Enforcement. State of California. 

(b) Federal Inspection — San Francisco District. 

Acknowledgment is hereby made to Thomas Magee & Sons. Dun &; Hrad>treet, Inc.. local utilities, private organizations. Federal 
Reserve Bank of San Francisco. California State Departments of Industrial Relations, Agriculture, and Employment, and the United 
States Departments of Labor. Agriculture, and Commerce, and the United Slates Bureau of the Census, for the basic data each con- 
tributed toward this survey compiled by the Research Department. San Francisco Chamber of Commerce, 
(c) June not available in time for survey — May repeated. (d) 5 months' average repeated. 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Thursday, August 3, 1944 



FOREIGN TRADE TIPS 



The Chamber of Commerce cannot undertake to 
guarantee the financial standing and responsibility 
of any firm or individual mentioned in TRADE 
TIPS, and it is suggested that the usual investiga- 
tion be made in each instance. For further details 
regarding an item call the World Trade Depart- 
ment of the San Francisco Chamber of Commerce, 
EXbrook 4511, and refer to inquiry by the Trade 
Tip's number. 

3349 FISH AND VEGETABLES 

Vila Hermanns. Ltda. Apartado Postal 722. 
Panama, Republica de Panama, seeks contact 
with producers and distributors of fruits and 
vegetables, fish, canned vegetables, toys, etc. 

3350 REPRESENTATION IN ARGENTINA 
Gerardo Bruck, Calle Solis Numero 905, Buenos 
Aires. Argentina, desires contact with San Fran- 
cisco manufacturers and exporters, for their repre- 
sentation in Argentina. 

3351 TRADE WITH PORTUGAL 

Sociedade Comercial Do Ocidente. S.A., Rua Do 
Crucifixo 76. Lisbon, Portugal, is interested in 
representing American manufacturers and ex- 
porters in Portugal. 

3352 BUSINESS WITH ECUADOR 

Victor Thoret. Colon 32!. Apartado Postal 100. 
Guayaquil Ecuador, wants connections with San 
Francisco exporters of all products, for their 
representation in Ecuador. 

3353 FRUITS AND VEGETABLES 

Vila Hermanos, Ltd.. Apartado Postal 722. 
Panama. Republica de Panama, is anxious to 
contact exporters of fruits and vegetables, canned 
fish, toys, etc. That company desires to represent 
American exporters and importers of different 

3354 CAPERS WASHING MACHINERY 

Sobrino de Izquierdo. Inc., Apartado Postal 4232. 
San Juan. Puerto Rico, is interested in buying a 
machine for washing capers. 

3355 CINNAMON AND PEPPER 

Centro Mercantil d-- M. .m.-rrev S.A.. Apartado 
Postal 328. Juarez Sur. 740. Monterrey. Nuevo 
Leon, Mexico, desires contact with firms that 
might be interested in exporting Ceylon cinna- 
mon and black Singapore pepper. 

3356 RAW SKINS AND FURS 

Compania Sud Americana de Comercio, Calle 
Defensa 6S3. Buenos Aires. Argentina, is inter- 
ested in exporting Argentine raw skins and furs. 
3*57 FISH PACKING MACHINERY 

Melchor D. Caballero. Calle Constitucion 506 
Sur, Apartado Postal 160, Durango. Estado de 
Durango, Mexico, wanl- to be put in touch with 
manufacturers of fish and meat packing ma- 
chinery. 

3358 PLASTIC HAIR ORNAMENTS 

Diener Inc. 405 East 4th Street. Los Angeles, 
California, manufacturers of plastic hair orna- 
ments, seek connections with export agent who 
would purchase, finance and consummate the 
complete export transaction. 

3359 COMMERCIAL FACILITIES 

Asociacion Nacional de Importadores y Exporta- 
dores de la Republica Mexicana, offers services to 
assist importers and exporters in the solution of 
all problems in connection with foreign trade and 
cooperating with the Government authorities, 
being closely and directly in connection with the 
Mexican Government Department which con- 
trols all movement of import and export. 

3360 RATTAN FOR CHAIR SEATS 

Francisco Haces Madrid, Apartado Postal Nu- 
mero 46, Tampico. Taumalipas. Mexico, is in- 
terested in purchasing rattan for chair seats. 

3361 ARGENTINE COMMODITIES 

Van Pervorgh y Cia. S.R.L., Calle Uruguay 440. 
Buenos Aires. Argentina, seek connections with 
San Francisco importers of different products 
from Argentina. 

3362 REPRESENTATION IN ITALY 

Luigi Buresti, Castellamare de Stabia. 8 Via 
Panoramica, Casella Postale 4. Napoli. Italia, 
wants to represent San Francisco exporters of 
various types of merchandise in Italy. 

3363 MACHINERY FOR MAKING MOSAICS 
Ricardo Haces. Apartado Postal 70. Ciudad Vic- 
toria, Tamaulipas, Mexico, desires to buy a pres- 
sure machine for making mn^ucs and flagstones. 
size: 10 x 20 cms. and 20 x 20 cems.. with a pro- 
duction capacity of 3.000 mosaics of flagstones a 
day, working 8 hours. 

3364 SEEDS AND PLANTS 

Hijos de S. V. Bellotti, Sociedad en Comandita, 
Calle Guanacache 5459. Buenos Aires. Argentina. 
are anxious to export select seeds and plants from 

3365 ONIONS 

Camara > 

regon. Ar 

Obregon. Sonora. Mexico, wants to be put 

touch with firms which might 

purchasing Mexican onions. 



C of C Directors at 
Supervisors' Meetings 

As of Thursday, June 8, the Board 
of Directors of the San Francisco 
Chamber of Commerce initiated a 
practice whereby several members 
would represent the Board at each 
weekly meeting of the City's Board of 
Supervisors. 

• Schedule of Directors attending 
so far is as follows: 

Monday, June 26: Adrien J. Falk, 
Prentiss A. Rowe, JohnC. McPherson. 

Monday, July 3: Herbert V. Al- 
ward, George H. Jess. 

Monday, July 10: Elmer G. John- 
son, Ralph R. Brunton. 

Monday, July 17: Harold W. Kil- 
patrick, Carl J. Eastman. 

Monday, July 24: Arthur W. 
Towne, Harvey Hancock. 

Monday, July 31: J. F. Barrett, 
Elmer G. Johnson. 



FOREIGN TRADE TIPS^-w 

3366 DRIED BANANAS 

Humberto Ferrari, 5333 Coliseum Street. New 
Orleans. Louisiana, seeks contact with firms in- 
terested in purchasing dried bananas in any quan- 
tity packed in southern Mexico. Sample and ref- 
erences are available at the World Trade Depart- 

3367 IMPORTATION FROM ARGENTINA 

G. Kullok. Calle Hualfin. 1166. Buenos Aires. 
Argentina, is in position to export women's hand 
bags, men's billfolds and bronze fasteners for 
women's hand bags. 

3368 AUTOMOBILE ACCESSORIES 
Distribuidoras de Fabrica S.A.. Apartado Postal 
Numero 166. Calles Juarez y Leona Vicario. 
Torreon, Coahuila. Mexico, want connections 
with San Francisco exporters of automobile acces- 

3369 PACKERS CANNED GOODS 

Davila Hermanos Inc.. Apartado Postal Numero 



packers of fruits, vege- 



The San Francisco Chamber of Commerce 

333 Pine Street, San Francisco 4 
EXbrook 4511 



Postwar Jobs, Subject of 
Small Business Hearing 
in San Francisco 

Statements, varied in theme, were 
submitted early this week in San 
Francisco at conferences conducted 
by Senator James E. Murray of Mon- 
tana as chairman of the U. S. Senate 
Special Committee to Study the Prob- 
lems of American Small Business. 

• Witnesses included representa- 
tives of the state and federal govern- 
ments, chambers of commerce, trade 
associations and individuals. 

In behalf of San Francisco 
Chamber members who recorded 
their views in a recent survey, 
Louis B. Lundborg, general man- 
ager of the organization, said: 
(a) business should not be ham- 
pered by government any longer 
than thejwar demands; (b) tax 
law revision to encourage capital 
to create industrial employment 
is imperative; and (c) although 
business, admittedly, will be re- 
sponsible for the solution of crit- 
ical postwar problems, it signifi- 
cantly is not the advocate of 
paternalistic legislation in its be- 
half. 

• Next week's Bay Region Business 
will carry detailed results of the sur- 
vey and other pertinent material. 



Published weekly at 333 Pine St., San Francisco, 
Zone 4, County of San Francisco, California. Will 
Williams, Editor. Telephone EXbrook 4511. Sub- 
scription, Fifty Cents a Year (Included in Annual 
Dues). Entered as Second Class matter April 26, 
1944. at the Post Office at San Francisco, Cali- 
fornia, under the act of March 3, 1870. 




r W PUBLISHED BY THE 



Volume 



W PUBLISHED BY 1 

SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 

Thursday, August 10, 1944 



Number 19 



Telegraphic Centennial 
Of Special Import Here 

The fact that the telegraph has 
completed its first hundred years of 
service this spring is especially mem- 
orable in San Francisco, the center 
for lines of communications fanning 
out into the areas of the Pacific, 
Adrien J. Falk said today. 

"It is made still more memor- 
able through the establishment 
of a new million dollar, completely 
automatic, telegraph office in 
Oakland which A. N. Williams, 
president of the Western Union 
Telegraph office recently dedi- 
cated," Falk added. 

"That the telegraph, the first mes- 
sage over which wassen tin May of 1844, 
was invented by Samuel F. B. Morse, 
a Yale graduate, who had made his 
living by painting portraits on ivory, 
is not as remarkable as it seems. It is 
merely another evidence of the in- 
superable Yankee ingenuity which has 
made this nation great." 

• Morse conceived the idea of elec- 
tro-magnetic telegraphic communica- 
tion in the year 1832. 

• The first transcontinental mes- 
sage sent over the telegraph came 
from California. Fittingly enough it 
consisted of an assurance from Stephen 
J. Field, Chief Justice of California, 
to the federal government that Cali- 
fornia would stand with the Northern 
forces in the struggle that was to be- 
come known as the Civil War. 



Luncheon 
Announcement 
Inside . . . 

See Page 3 



Tartrate-Tartaric Plant, Nation's 
Largest, Locates in Oakland 




FRANK E. MARSH 

Frank E. Marsh, manager, San 
Francisco Chamber's Washington Of- 
fice, will speak to all Chamber mem- 
bers at a special meeting this after- 
noon at 3:30 p.m. in the P. G. & E. 
Auditorium, 245 Market Street. 

"Members should welcome this 
opportunity for a firsthand report 
from Washington," said Adrien 
J. Falk, president. 

Marsh, here for a brief stay from 
Washington, D. C, where for five 
months he has been working in the 
interest of the San Francisco Bay 
Area and the West Coast, will sum- 
marize recent Washington develop- 
ments. 

He will also bring members up- 
to-date on the status of federal 
legislation and policies affecting 
the Bay region. 



Upwards of 87-50,000 will be in- 
vested by Alloychemical Corporation 
in reconversion of the Southern Pa- 
cific Company steam-electric genera- 
tor plant in Oakland into the largest 
tartrate and tartaric manufacturing 
plant in the United States, according 
to an announcement by Elmer H. 
Hammond, manager, Oakland Cham- 
ber of Commerce Industrial Depart- 
ment. 

• Conversion program will start 
immediately in the huge manufactur- 
ing plant on five acres of industrial 
property. The plant is expected to be 
in full operation by October 1, 1944. 

• Plans for the Oakland Plant, 
which will utilize waste and non-food 
products within an area of 150 miles, 
were revealed by Manager Hammond 
and George F. Tubbs, Livermore, 
vice-president and secretary of Alloy- 
chemical Corporation. 

• Purpose of Alloychemical Cor- 
poration, according to Tubbs, is de- 
velopment of chemical and metal 
enterprises related to the natural re- 
sources of the new industrial West, 
and production of raw materials for 
chemical and metal industries. 

The corporation will manufacture 
tartaric acid and by-products, includ- 
ing potable alcohol and will employ 
between 50 and 55 persons. 



Buyers Attendance Heavy at 
Apparel Market Week Here 

Showrooms of some 120 manufac- 
turers and wholesalers of women's 
apparel in San Francisco are crowded 
with buyers from all over the West 
and the United States as Fall Market 
Week for wholesalers and Mid-Season 
Market Week for manufacturers goes 
into its last day. 

The Women's Apparel and Milli- 
nerv Market sponsored by the Manu- 
facturers and Wholesalers Associatioi , 
started Sunday, August 6 and ei«.s 
todav. 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Thursday, August 10, 1944 



Acquisition of City Hotels 

Under Study by War Dept. 



Contractor's Guide is 
Available at C of C 

The San Francisco Chamber has 
secured a limited supply of the Con- 
tractor's Guide, recently published by 
the War Department, which contains 
a wealth of helpful information and 
suggestions on contract termination 
and settlement for the benefit of con- 
tractors, subcontractors, and sup- 
pliers, according to Carrol Snyker, 
Domestic Trade Department. 

Copies may be obtained from 
the Domestic Trade Department. 



San Franciscans' Cooperation 
On Paper Salvage Drive Urged 

With waste paper the No. 1 war 
material shortage in the United States 
today, the month of August has been 
designated for an extensive campaign 
to collect newspapers, magazines, 
books, cartons, cardboard boxes, 
files, etc., from business houses and 
private homes in San Francisco. 

• Throughout the month, there 
will be a building pick-up for business 
houses. 

"With the realization of the 
critical and immediate need for 
every scrap of waste paper, I want 
to ask each Chamber member to 
post a notice on his bulletin board 
or send out an office memoran- 
dum in order to enlist the efforts 
of every member of every business 
staff in this campaign to build up 
San Francisco's waste paper sal- 
vage contribution," said Adrien 
J. Falk, San Francisco Chamber 
president. 

Berkeley Expansion Told 

With anticipated good business 
conditions after the war, Berkeley's 
industrial employment will be 62 per 
cent greater than it was in 1940, ac- 
cording to Raymond M. Young, chair- 
man, C. E. D. Postwar Committee, 
Berkeley Chamber. 

• Young said that the recent San 
Francisco Federal Reserve Bank-C. 
E. D. survey of larger industry in the 
Bay Area reveals that 44 Berkeley- 
factories, an 80 per cent sample, are 
doing a 858,800,000 current annual 
business in contrast to a 834,846,000 
annual business done bv 154 plants 
in 1939. 



Although the War Department is 
considering acquisition of some major 
hotels in San Francisco for use by 
the Army, assurance has been given 
that before any final action is taken 
the matter will be taken up with local 
hotel men, Adrien J. Falk, president, 
San Francisco Chamber announced 
today. 

• The Chamber received informa- 
tion last week that the War Depart- 
ment was considering taking over 
some major hotels in the city. Oppos- 
ing such an action in view of San 
Francisco's critical housing situation, 
Mayor Lapham and Falk wired Under 
Secretary of War Patterson pointing 
out the transient population load 
which hotels here were supporting and 
the extent to which these hotels were 
housing military and war-employed 
personnel. It was suggested that ac- 
commodations be secured farther in- 
land, and that local interests be given 
the opportunity to present their case. 

• In response, Brehon Somervell, 
Commanding General, Army Service 
Forces, wired Falk stating that the 
matter was still in a survey stage and 
that members of hotel association or 
leading hotel men of San Francisco 
and other Army Ports of Embarka- 
tion will be consulted. 

Somervell said the Army's prob- 
lem was to assure adequate hotel 
facilities for men about to re-em- 
bark for overseas after combat 
earned furlough here. 



Officers, Junior Foreign Trade 
Association Announced 

The Junior Foreign Trade Associa- 
tion of the San Francisco Chamber of 
Commerce announced today election 
of the following officers and directors 
for the 1944-45 year: 

President, Joseph R. Fernandez, 
Argentine Trade Promotion Corp. ; 
Vice-President, Waldron B. Grib- 
ble, W. P. Fuller & Co. ; Secretary, 
David E. Porter, W. R. Grace & 
Co. ; Treasurer, William A. Hamil- 
ton, Fidelity <£: Casualty Co. of 
N. Y.; Lyford M. Morris, Moore- 
McCormack Lines, Inc.; Vaugn C. 
Earp, Bank of America N. T. & 
S. A.; Joseph Del Valle, Ensign, 
United States Navy. 



Policies on Government 
Purchasing and Selling 
Agencies Announced 

Recommended by the Postiuar Plan- 
ning Committee for Foreign Trade — a 
sub-committee of the San Francisco 
Chamber of Commerce Foreign Trade 
Committee, and approved by the Foreign 
Trade Committee and the Chamber 
Board of Directors . . . 

The San Francisco Chamber of 
Commerce enunciates the following 
Declaration of Policv: 
GOVERNMENT PURCHASING 
AND SELLING AGENCIES 

Argument in favor of free enter- 
prise in general finds equal application 
in international commerce. 

With a view to facilitating lend- 
lease and military operations, foreign j 
governments established during the 
war period agencies in the United 1 
States to handle bulk purchases. Our 
government established agencies to] 
handle foreign purchases of many] 
strategic materials and their distribu- 
tion to our war industries. 

Much international trade in com- 
modities has thereby been diverted 
from normal, private business chan-j 
nels. 

Recognizing the value to our do- 
mestic economy and to international 
economy of import-export merchants 
and other private trading factors, wel 
urge the immediate postwar releasel 
by our own and other governments of | 
these governmental trading opera-l 
tions, and their restoration to privatel 
foreign trade. 



Needed — Fall and 
Winter Food Gardens 

Even if the war were to end to-J 
morrow, there would still be need for 
every extra pound of food this coun- 
try could spare for the next twelve 
months. 

This is the belief of the War Food 
Administration, according to E. H. 
Spoor, Regional W. F. A. Director 
for the eleven Western States. Extra 
food must be sent to the liberated 
countries for a few crucial months at 
least. 

• From now until September 15, 
an intensive "Fall and Winter Food 
Garden" campaign is being carried 
on, activated by the National Vic- 
tory Garden Institute and the Agri- 
cultural Extension Service of thet 
Universitv of California. 



Thursday, August 10, 1944 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Chamber Gives U. S. Senate 
Committee Business Views 



MEMBERSHIP QUESTIONNAIRE RESULTS TABULATED 



Reflecting the results of a membership 
poll taken on recommendation of the San 
Francisco Chamber' s I ndustrial Committee, 
the statement presented to the L . S. Senate 
Special [Committee to Study the Problems 
of American Small Business by Louis B. 
Lundborg, General Manager, in San Fran- 
cisco on August 1. in part, was as folloics: 

"Fundamental conditions pertaining to San Francisco 
and the West — to which its affairs are so closely linked — 
are most encouraging. However, there are trends in re- 
gard to our economy which give serious concern. We 
therefore want to express to you some views in regard 
to government and 'small' business, taxes and Senate 
Bill 1913. 

"As background for three suggestions which we 
desire to convey, there are several points which we 
should enumerate: 

"(1) We are unalterably devoted to all possible efforts 
which will contribute to the financing and winning of the 
war; 

"(2) It is recognized that current manpower, mate- 
rial, price, wage and other controls, imposed by the 
Federal government, cannot be abruptly ended during 
the war, but could be tapered off in a manner that would 
afford the soundest possible solutions to war contract 
termination, plant reconversion and war materials and 
facilities disposal problems. If manpower is to be retained 
in western war plants during the emergency, it must have 
assurances that national reconversion policies will be 
applied with national uniformity and not on the basis 
of swamping the West with war work after the conflict 
ends in Europe and while the fight continues in the 
Orient. 'Cutbacks' should not be concentrated in the 
eastern states. It is essential to the welfare of all that, if 
there is piecemeal reduction of war production, there 
must be piecemeal increases in civilian production. The 
staggering of cutbacks and the staggering of reconversion 
must be intelligently planned to encourage the war 
worker to stay on the job and win the war. 

"(3) The greatest employment opportunities at the 
highest feasible wage will be afforded for demobilized 
service men and other workers by the unhampered pres- 
ervation and encouragement of the American free en- 
terprise system. 

*The figures on opposite side of page include results 
the Senate hearing. See Pg. B. 



"(4) There is no question that manpower, price, ma- 
terial, wage and other controls are a necessary part of 
the war effort, even though in the administration of 
these controls there has been a tendency for some de- 
cisions to be arbitrary and unfair, which if continued 
would defeat the fundamental principles of democracy 
that have contributed to the progress and prosperity of 
this Nation in the past. 



"Now, in the light of these points, we have three 
proposals: 

"First: — Prompt and continuing action to minimize 
the control of business by Federal or other governmental 
agencies after the war is ended. The majority of those 
whom we represent do not favor the perpetuation of 
wartime controls, let alone the creation of additional 
agencies to help solve the problems imposed on business 
by branches of government previously established. The 
taking of government out of business is probably the 
most constructive development that could occur to 
solve the problems of small business. 

"Second: — While general problems of taxation must 
have continuing attention and there must be less extrav- 
agance and greater economy in government, we would 
welcome immediate revision of Federal revenue laws to 
encourage the availability of risk-taking capital for the 
establishment and expansion of new industrial enter- 
prises. We suggest legislation which would provide an 
income tax law formula to stimulate the provision of 
new capital for industry. 

"Third: — The Smaller War Plants Corporation has 
accomplished creditable results under wartime condi- 
tions and in solving problems originally caused by 
Federal procurement agencies. Those who have been 
identified with the work of the Corporation are to be 
commended. However, enactment of Senate Bill 1913 is 
not favored. The bill would tend to socialize 'small' 
business by giving the Federal government a paternal- 
istic relationship to economic affairs which is not wanted 
by the majority of business men. If the extension of the 
life of the Smaller War Plants Corporation is required by 
wartime problems, specific legislation for this particular 
purpose would be more appropriate than S. 1913. 

"As previously mentioned, most of the views which I 
have expressed are based on a survey of our membership 
through a questionnaire. A letter from Adrien J. Falk, 
President of the Chamber, transmitted a form for reply 
to each member. Although the time has been short and 
returns are still coming in, summarized results follow." 
from all returns received, having been adjusted since 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Thursday, August 10, 1944 



Membership Questionnaire Results 



Kind of Business: — 

Manufacturing. 

Retailing 

Wholesaling 

Servicing 

Other 



Total. 



Size of Business:- 

"Small" as per 

Large 

Indeterminate 



Total. 



S. 1913 definiti. 



Is your business concern a "dominating unii 
of such dominating unit"? 

Number ("Small" Business) 

Percentages 



de or industry or othe 



1 under the management i 



Have you had assistance from the Smaller War Plants Corporate 

Number 

Percentages 



Was such assistance made necessary by problems created by government procedures, directives or bureaus? 

Number 26 , 

Percentage of those who had assistance 87 



Number 

. 223 

153 
66 




50 

35 
15 


. 442 




100 


Yes 

1 


No 


Blank 


60 
23 


190 

77 




30 

7 


398 
90 


14 
3 



such assistance made necessary by inherent problems of vour business? 

Number ' 

Percentage of those who had assistance 



Is the advice and assistance of a qualified government agent desired in the i 
service to correspond to that rendered to the farmer by the county agent? 

Number 

Percentages 



Would you favor establishment of a government "Small Business Corporation," capitalized at $1,000,000.00(1. to 
"provide for character loans to small business," no application therefore to "be rejected solely upon the basis of col- 
lateral offered or the lack of any collateral, or the status of the balance sheet or financial statement, whenever the 
corporation shall be otherwise reasonably satisfied in respect to the soundness of the loan by information concerning 
the character and competence, past performance and business prospects of the applicant"? 

Number 

Percentages 

Senate Bill 1913 was introduced in Congress on May 12, 1944. Are you at all familiar with it? 

Number 

Percentages 

If so, do vou favor its enactment? 

Number 

Percentages 

With which of the following statements do you agree? 

(a) While many governmental agencies to control operations of the nation's businesses have been necessary 
for the successful prosecution of the war, at the end of the war business will be able to provide greater 
employment if governmental controls are minimized rather than extended 388 

(b) Wartime experiences with governmental controls through the War Production Board, Office of Price Ad- 
ministration, and other agencies and the functioning of the Smaller War Plants Corporation have demon- 
strated that business will be better able to provide employment after the war if such agencies are extended 

and elaborated '2 

Conflict in answers or no answer 

(a and b) « 



50 

11 


335 57 
76 13 


6 
12 


37 7 
74 It 


Checked 


Percentag 



Total. 



.442 



Checked 

(c) In view of the cost of the war and the consequent taxation which is necessary, revenue laws should not be 
made preferential to the extent that they would encourage the investment of capital in new, risk-taking 

'ndustrial enterprises - - ■ ■ 13 

immediate revision of income tax laws to encourage the availability of capital for new risk-taking indus- 



(d) 



npcr.it i 



335 



trial enterprises 

Conflict in answers or no answer 

(candd) J* 4 _21 

Total - «2 '0" 

Remarks were added to 124 or 28% of the forms and 322 or 73% were signed and 119 or 27% unsigned. 

"The figures give impressive emphasis to these points: 

"(a) business should not be hampered by government any longer than the war demands; 

"(b) tax law revision to encourage capital to create industrial employment is imperative; and 

"(r) although business, admittedly, will be responsible for the solution of critical postwar problems, it significantly is not the advo- 
cate of paternalistic legislation in its behalf." 

(Persons interested in more details in regard to the questionnaire returns are invited to telephone 
the Chamber's Industrial Department, EX brook 4511.) 



/i 



OPA - and the Reconversion lob Ahead for Business 



ft 



A MESSAGE FROM 



CHESTER BOWLES 

Administrator, Office of Price Administration 



At Luncheon in the Commercial Club 



Friday, August 25, 1944 



SPONSORED BY 



San Francisco Chamber of Commerce 
San Francisco Commercial Club 



UST FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 
53 Pine Street, San Francisco, California 

Please reserve place(s) for me at $1.50 each at 

ncheon honoring CHESTER BOWLES on Friday, August 2 5, in 
e San Francisco Commercial Club, at 12 noon. (Kindly enclose 
lf-addressed envelope for forwarding tickets.) 



fleck 
ldosed 



Name 

Firm 

Address 



At Luncheon in 

The San Francisco 
Commercial Club 

Friday noon, August 25. 1944 

Price $1.50 per plate 
{ $1.46 plus 4c tax} 



R.S.V.P. Members will be taken care of to 
the limit of capacity and as received, but it 
will be to your advantage to make reserva- 
tions early before ticket sales are opened to 
the general public. 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Thursday, August 10, 1944 



FOREIGN TRADE TIPS 



The Chamber of Commerce cannot undertake to 
guarantee the financial standing and responsibility 
of any firm or individual mentioned in TRADE 
TIPS, and it is suggested that the usual investiga- 
tion be made in each instance. For further details 
regarding an item call the World Trade Depart- 
ment of the San Francisco Chamber of Commerce, 
EXbrook 4511, and refer to inquiry by the Trade 
Tip's number. 



468. Guayaquil. Ecuador, is interested in 
types of merchandise for selling in Ecuador. 

3371 MACHINERY AND EQUIPMENTS 

H. M. Hardy. Tegucigalpa D.C.. Honduras, Cen- 
tral America, desires contact with exporters of 
machinery of all classes, tools, and equipment, 
electrical supplies, diesel engines, automobile 
equipment. Bank references supplied. 

3372 RAFFIA 

Royal Importing Co. Inc.. 822 X. Mi 



- Raffia. 
3373 CURTAIN NET AND WOOLENS 

Isaac Modiano Brothers and Sons Ltd.. 5 LInyds 
Avenue. London. England, seek contact with San 
Francisco importers of cotton Bretonne nets, 
Nottingham laces, rayon lace nets and woolen 



■ishes to buy carnauba wax. 

3376 TRADE WITH NICARAGUA 

Marenco y Vargas, Cia Ltda., Avenida Bolivar 
frente al hotel La Tosca. Managua, Nicaragua, 
Central America, desire connections with San 
Francisco exporters and importers of various 
products for their representation in Nicaragua. 

3377 BUSINESS WITH GUATEMALA 

Leon Guttmann y Cia, Guatemala City, Guate- 
mala. Central America, want to be put in touch 
with San Francisco exporters of general merchan- 
dise and importers of coffee, broom root, honey, 
beeswax, etc. 

3378 REPRESENTATION IN PUERTO RICO 
Harry Wolkowitch, P.O. Box 1377. San Juan 6. 
Puerto Rico, desires to represent San Francisco 
manufacturers and exporters in Puerto Rico. 

3379 MEXICAN PRODUCTS 

L. Charles Field Jr.. Insurgentes Numero 323. 
Guadalajar.i, Jalisco, Mexico, is anxious to export 
Mexican products, such as gloves, hand bags, 
huaraches, sandals, etc. 

3380 CUBAN LIQUORS 

Compania Cubana Productora de Ginebra S.A., 
Apartado Postal numero 1906. La Habana. Cuba, 
seeks contact with San Francisco importers of 
liquors. That company produces different kinds 
of liquors- List of them is available at the World 
Trade Department. 

3381 TYPICAL ARTICLES 

Artes Regionales S.A.. Obregon Numero 33. Apar- 
tado Postal Numero 76. Toluca, Mexico, wants 
connections with importers of Mexican typica. 
products. They manufacture furniture, especially 
chairs, toys, ceramics, knitted fibre articles, etc. 

3382 TRADE WITH HAITI 

Alphonse Haynes, P.O. Box 121. Port-Au-Prin 



SPECIAL NOTICE: IMPORTED INDUSTRIAL 
MATERIALS FOR GOVERNMENT CONTRACTS. 

The Office of Price Administration, San Francisco Dis- 
trict Office, 1358 Market Street. 3rd floor. San Fran- 
cisco 3, California, communicates the following:"Sales 
of imported industrial materials to Government Agen- 
cies. Government Contractors or Sub-contractors are 
now subject to price control, effective July 15, 1944. 
Importers caught in a severe "squeeze" owing to pur- 



Import Price Branch. Office of Price Adrr 
Washington 25. D.C.. giving the following information 
in their letter: 

1. Description of the materials purchased. 2. Total 
quantity purchased (indicate what portion is in inven- 
tory and what is for future delivery). 3. Name and 
address of foreign seller. 4. The prices paid to the for- 
eign seller and all other cost of importation. 5. Date of 
purchase. 6. Prices charged by the foreign supplier for 
the same materials during the 30 days prior to August 
20, 1943. 7. Any outstanding contacts for sale ©f such 
materials and the agreed selling prices. 8. Customary 
markup (on cost) taken by the trade during March, 
1942. 



BOARD MEMBERS AT 
SUPERVISORS' MEETING 

Members of the San Fran- 
cisco Chamber Board of Direc- 
tors in attendance at the Board 
of Supervisors meeting, Mon- 
day, August 7, were: 

Earl Lee Kelly, vice presi- 
dent, Bank of America, N. T. & 
S. A. 

JohnM. Kennedy, president, 
Kennedy-ten Bosch Company. 



Junior Chamber Streetcar Plan 

A plan for unified operation of the 
Municipal and Market Street Rail- 
way systems aimed to effect a 25 per 
cent faster service with a less crowded 
condition of streetcars and busses has 
been presented by the San Francisco 
Junior Chamber for consideration by 
a number of local groups. 



FOREIGN TRADE TIPS-cw-w 

SPECIAL NOTICE: The Argentina Trade Pro- 
motion Corporation, a non-political and non-profit or- 
ganization, engaged in the promoting trade between 
Argentina and the United States, announces that it 
has moved into larger quarters in the Mills Building. 
Its address is now V2 l > Mills Building, San Francisco 4. 
California. That offiYe welcomes requests for informa- 
tion of an economic nature on Argentina and will assist 
foreign traders with any problems they have in con- 
nection with Argentine imports and exports. 

SPECIAL NOTICE: At the World Trade Depart- 
ment Office, is available to anyone interested, a copy 
of the Pan-American Postal and Telegraphic Guide, a 
review nf Commerce and Industry of Pan-America. 



Pi 


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ne St 


, San Fran 


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Telephon 


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Entered a 


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1870. 





DOMESTIC TRADE TIPS 



A digest of correspondence received 
from those desiring, or offering, lines 
of merchandise for representation. 
They are listed here as a service with- 
out necessarily bearing endorsement 
by the Chamber. For further details, 
contact the Domestic Trade Depart- 
ment, EXbrook 4511, Ext. 74. 

D-6032— ROBERT M. KOHN, 1414 West 
14th Street, Spokane, Washington, seeking to 
represent manufacturing or distributing or- 
ganization in Washington, Idaho, and Mon- 

D-6033— A. H. HAMILTON, HAMIL- 
TON AUTO GLAZE COMPANY, 1426. 
Alta Vista Road, Santa Barbara, California, 
manufacturers of Hamilton Auto Glaze, an 
automobile cleaner and polish. Wishes Dis- 
tributor. 

D-6034~PAUL H LAUVER, 306 Orange 
Street, Northumberland, Pennsylvania, 
wishes to represent in his territory a reliable 
local product. 

D-6035— GEORGE A. HERBERT, 42 
208th Street, Bayside, Long Island, New 
York, is desirous of representing reputable 
manufacturer in the Metropolitan Area of 
New York City. 

D-6036— H. D. GLENN, SALES MAN- 
AGER, MARCO COMPANY, INC., 511 
Monroe Street, Wilmington, Delaware, wishes 
to place their sanitary transfer pump in the 
postwar market, through a local distributor, 
preferably one selling to food and chemical 
industries. 

d-6037— j. c. McCarthy, 1122 Ho< 

son Building, Minneapolis, 1, Minnesota 
wishes to contact manufacturers who are 
terested in sales connections in his area. Pre 
fers articles in the household furnishings field 

D-6038— A. J. GREEN NOVELTY COM 
PANY, 420 Kasota Building, Minneapolis, 1 
Minnesota, serving territories of North and 
South Dakota, Minnesota, Wisconsin, and 
Iowa and are looking for sources which manu- 
facture Novelty and Notion items. 

D-6039— F.'T. MILLIGAN, EMPIRE 
COMPANY, 117 South Wilson Avenue, Jef- 
ferson, Iowa, interested in contacting suitable' 
representative for their jewelry and costume 
pin line, on a commission basis. 



The San Francisco Chamber of Commerce 

333 Pine Street, San Francisco 4 
EXbrook 4511 





'aa Beaton ^>u4iaeM- 

* W PUBLISHED BY THE 



SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 



Volume I 



Thursday, August 17, 1944 



Number 20 



Sales Managers Council for Economic 
Development to Hold Conference 



)akland Chamber Supports 
/Vorld Trade Center 

The Oakland Chamber of Commerce at 
ts latest board of directors' meeting voted 
manimously to endorse the World Trade 
Center Project originated by O. C. Hansen 
nd launched by the San Francisco Chamber. 
• Opposition to Proposition No. 11, the 
Sixty Dollars at Sixty" initiative measure 
n the November ballot, was also registered 
nanimously by the Oakland Chamber Board, 
rhe measure would provide a three per cent 
,toss income tax throughout the State of 
California. 

The Oakland Chamber Board also 
ndorsed four points of the Shoreline 
Development Master Plan which are of 
pecific concern to the East Bay. These 
toints include Bayshore Highway Ex- 
ension, establishment of engineering 
nd planning commissions, united action 
in sewage problems, and exploration of 
ilans for a second Bay Bridge. 

The Oakland Chamber has also decided to 
e-establish its Foreign Trade Department. 



Manpower Meeting 

This afternoon, Thursday, at 2:30 
in the P. G. & E. Auditorium, Sam 
Kagel, acting State Manpower Direc- 
tor for Northern California, will ex- 
plain and interpret the new amend- 
ment to the local Stabilization Program 
affecting employers in other than essen- 
tial or locally needed activities. 

The order becomes effective August 
21. 

Sponsored by the San Francisco Em- 
ployers Council and the San Francisco 
Chamber of Commerce, the meeting is 
open to all interested employers. 

Questions will be welcomed. 



Bowles to Discuss Reconversion 
and OPA at Commercial Club 

Among those who have been invited to be 
present at the luncheon are Governor Earl 
Warren; Robert W. Kenny, Attorney Gen- 
eral of California; Mayor Roger D. Lapham 
of San Francisco; Thomas A. Brooks, Chief 
Administrative Officer of San Francisco; 
Charles R. Baird, Regional Administrator for 
OPA, and the directors of the OPA offices 
of Reno, Sacramento, Fresno and San Fran- 



* The reconversion job ahead for busi- 
less and the part which the OPA will play 
n the change-over from war to peacetime 
traduction for American industry will be the 
ubject of an address by Chester Bowles, 
Wministrator of the Office of Price Admin- 
stration. at a San Francisco Chamber of 
Commerce and Commercial Club luncheon 
n the Commercial Club, Friday noon, Au- 
;ust 25. 

"All members of the Chamber are 
irged to attend," said Adrien J. Falk, 
>resident, in pointing out that the event 
vould form an opportunity to gain first- 
land knowledge of the government's 
econversion policies. 



• The luncheon is being held under the 
joint sponsorship of the San Francisco 
Chamber of Commerce and the San Fran- 
cisco Commercial Club. Reservations may be 
obtained at a total price of #1.50 per plate. 



Marketing and sales training experts from 
throughout the Nation will gather in San 
Francisco Monday, August 28, to participate 
in a five-day conference on the postwar mar- 
keting problems of western industry. 

• More than 500 leading sales managers 
and company executives will attend the ses- 
sions, sponsored by the Sales Managers Coun- 
cil for Economic Development, formed by 
the San Francisco Sales Managers Club and 
the San Francisco Sales Managers Associa- 
tion. 

Purpose of the conference, according 
to Gene K. Walker, San Francisco mer- 
chandising counsellor and conference 
coordinator, is to present modern tech- 
niques for building productive sales 
forces. Scientific tests for "screening" 
millions of available workers who want 
to sell will be explained, and advanced 
methods for training those who are se- 
lected will be analyzed. 

• The five sessions, to be held in the Pacific 
Gas and Electric Company auditorium, from 
2 to 5 p.m., August 28 to September 1, will 
be devoted to the following subjects: tomor- 
row's salesmen, selecting salesmen, training 
salesmen, the teaching process and projections 
of sales training. 

Among the speakers will be: Adrien 
J. Falk, president of the San Francisco 
Chamber of Commerce, "Marketing Re- 
sponsibility in the Postwar West"; Alex- 
ander R. Heron, State Reconstruction 
and Reemployment Director, "Recon- 
verting Manpower"; Dr. David E. Fa- 
ville, professor of marketing at Stanford 
University's Graduate School of Busi- 
ness, "Job Analysis as the Foundation 
for Sales Training"; and Dr. Samuel 
N. Stevens, president, Grinnell College, 
"Psychological and Aptitude Tests as a 
Basis for the Selection of Salesmen." 

• Other speakers will include: George S. 
Jones, Jr., vice-president, Servel, Inc.; Dr. 
Alvin C. Eurich, academic vice-president, 
Stanford University, and A. O. Malmberg, 
director of public relations, Doughnut Cor- 
poration of America. 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Thursday, August 17, 1944 



Western Chambers Unite to Tell Story 

Reports Marsh In Talk To Members 



Anti-Fraud Campaign 
Underway for Business 
in Nothern California 

A campaign to protect Northern California 
business against fraudulent enterprises and 
the activities of racketeers is to begin shortly 
through the cooperation of the Better Busi- 
ness Bureau of San Francisco and the Central 
and Northern California Association of Com- 
mercial Secretaries. 

• An important aspect of the campaign 
will be the prevention of fraudulent activity 
breaking out in one town of the district after 
it has been exposed in another. 

This is "to be accomplished by the 
immediate issuance of warning bulletins 
to all participating chambers of com- 
merce in the district upon the reception 
of reports from any chamber of com- 
merce manager," according to Bud Tan- 
ner, of the San Francisco Chamber and 
secretary of the CANCACS. 

• In addition to this all participating 
CANCACS affiliated chamber of commerce 
managers will receive the confidential semi- 
monthly letter of the Better Business Bureau. 



Berkeley Chamber 
Supports Highway Link 

The Berkeley Chamber of Commerce has 
pledged its support to the Modesto- Yosemite 
airline highway link being sponsored by civic 
and business interests in Modesto, according 
to A. W. Elkinton, president. 

Possibilities of bringing Yosemite Val- 
ley 34 miles nearer to the Bay Region, 
via this new highway route extending 
easterly from Modesto to Briceburg 
where it would connect with the All- 
Year Highway, were presented by Mo- 
desto officials to Bay Area representa- 
tives at a July meeting arranged jointly 
by the San Francisco and Modesto 
chambers of commerce. 

In endorsing the proposed highway unit, 
the Transportation Committee of the Berke- 
ley Chamber called attention to the fact that 
it also is urging modernization of the Big 
Oak Flat Yosemite highway on which Berke- 
ley's Tuolumne summer camp is located. 



Stating that "San Francisco and the West 
must tell their story long and loud in Wash- 
ington," Frank E. Marsh, manager of the 
Washington office of the San Francisco 
Chamber of Commerce, told Chamber mem- 
bers in his report to them last week that the 
capital of the nation was much nearer San 
Francisco than San Francisco is to the capital. 
Reason for the condition, he said, is that few 
Westerners hold high executive positions in 
federal government. 

After citing the cooperation existing be- 
tween Washington representatives of Coast 
chambers of commerce, as evidenced by the 
aid he received from the Vallejo representa- 
tive in getting increased housing facilities for 
Hunters' Point, Marsh described the three 
main functions of the Washington office. 

Those functions are to serve: 1. San 
Francisco and the Bay Area; 2. Indi- 
vidual departments of the Chamber; 3. 
Individual members of the Chamber. 



Marsh said that one of the chief means by 
which the functions were carried out was by 
keeping in daily contact with the constantly 
changing Washington scene. This, he said, 
could be done only by having an office in the 
capital. 

Release of True Population 
Figure for S. F. Explained 

The full population figure for San Fran- 
cisco, although "Confidential" for purposes 
of military security, is available to federal 
agency officials in cases where the allocation 
of goods to the San Francisco area is de- 
pendent on an estimate of true population, 
according to a communication from Brig. 
Gen. Edward S. Greenbaum of the War De- 
partment, Washington, D. C, to Frank E. 
Marsh, manager, Washington office of the 
San Francisco Chamber. 
• Gen. Greenbaum's statement was made 
in answer to a letter from Marsh on behalf 
of the San Francisco Chamber urging that the 
actual population figure for the city be made 
public. Marsh was questioning the figure of 
700,735 released recently by the Bureau of 
Census, which, according to the Chamber's 
Research Department, does not represent the 
citv's total population. 



Position Taken on 
International Cartels By 
Chamber of Commerce 

Following study and recommendations by 
the Postwar Planning Com?nittee for Foreign 
Trade — a sub-committee of the Foreign 
Trade Committee, and clearance with the 
latter the San Francisco Chamber of Com- 
merce by action of the Board of Directors 
has enunciated the following Declaration of 
Policy on International Cartels: 

"Economic domination of world mar- 
kets through the medium of interna- 
tional cartels is contrary to the principle 
of competitive, free enterprise; and pres- 
sure should be brought to bear for elim- 
ination of international cartels in the 
postwar period. 

"Pending their elimination, international 
cartel agreements, to which American inter- 
ests, and foreign interests within the United 
States are parties, should be filed with an ap- 
propriate agency of the United States Gov- 
ernment, protected from exposure to com- J 
petitors, yet scanned by the Departments of 
War and Navy with a view to cartel agree- 
ment provisions being not inimical to ourl 
national defense." 

• Subsequent to the Postwar Planning 
Committee's study and preparation of its 
cartel declaration, United States Senator 
Joseph C. O'Mahoney of Wyoming intro- 
duced legislation (S. 1476) paralleling in 
large part the San Francisco Chamber's 
Declaration. 

One difference between the two is that 
S. 1476 would leave it to the discretion i 
of the United States Attorney General I 
whether or not a cartel agreement's term i 
would be exposed to competitors. 

In acknowledging San Francisco Chamber's - 
communication bearing the Chamber's Dec- 
laration of Policy on International Cartels, , 
Senator O'Mahoney stated: 

"I have read with much appreciation! 
your letter advising me that the Sam 
Francisco Chamber of Commerce has* 
announced a policy toward Interna- 
tional Cartels which in principle is that I 
upon which my bill, S. 1476, was drafted.. 
I am delighted to know of this action."'' 

Pan American Move 

Pan American World Airways is now inn 
the process of moving personnel and equip- 
ment from Treasure Island to the newly con- 
structed #3,500,000 terminal at San Fran- 
cisco Airport. 

• Training planes and facilities were firsti 
to move. Navy planes with shops and mainte-' 
nance facilities and finally Boeing Clippers 
and remainder of facilities are being trans- 
ferred next. 



Thursday, August 17, 1944 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Extension of Hawaii 
Air Service Urged 
By S. F. Chamber 

Endorsement of additional air services be- 
tween the San Francisco Bay Area and the 
Hawaiian Islands has been approved by the 
Board of Directors of the San Francisco 
Chamber of Commerce on recommendation 
of the Bay Area Air Transport Planning 
Committee. 

• Applications of Hawaiian Airlines, Ltd., 
Matson Navigation Company, Northwest 
Airlines, Inc., Western Air Lines, Inc., 
United Air Lines, and Ryan School of Aero- 
nautics for certificates of convenience and 
necessity to serve the islands from various 
Pacific Coast points are before the Civil Aero- 
nautics Board, and have been consolidated 
for joint hearing commencing September 4. 

The Chamber resolution urges the 
Civil Aeronautics Board to grant these 
applications, or any of them, to the ex- 
tent necessary to provide adequate, eco- 
lomical and efficient service between the 
San Francisco Bav Area and the Islands. 



Production Underway Now at 
China Aircraft, San Francisco 

Production has now started at China Air- 
craft Corporation, San Francisco, according 
to information received by the San Francisco 
Chamber from Dr. S. C. Hu, founder and 
chief engineer of the corporation. 
• China Aircraft, a completely Chinese 
staffed enterprise, holds a contract with 
Douglas Aircraft Company to produce air- 
plane subassemblies. 

Building of the plant, just completed, 
took 67 days, and the first rivet for the 
first airplane went in Monday, August 
7, keeping a schedule set up by corpora- 
tion executives three months ago. 



Regional Survey of "Work 
Pile" Results Now Underway 

In cooperation with the State Reconstruc- 
tion and Reemployment Commission, the 
California State Chamber of Commerce is un- 
dertaking collection and regional and state- 
wide summarization of results of local "Work 
Pile" surveys by chambers of commerce, 
Kiwanis clubs, and other groups which have 
collected information on the postwar inten- 
tions of business firms for expenditures on re- 
pair and remodeling, new construction, and 
new equipment. 

• This study of deferred or prospective 
private works, is intended to supplement the 
surveys of the proposed public works projects 
which the Commission is carrying on in co- 
operation with counties, municipalities, and 
districts. 

Inquiries have been sent to Chambers 
of Commerce throughout the Bay Area. 



O P A Appoints Five 
Bay Region Men 

Five Bay Region men were recently ap- 
pointed to Office of Price Administration in- 
dustry advisory committees. They are as fol- 
lows: 

• E. R. Warren, San Francisco; to advisory 
committee on pricing of grain sorghums. 

• A. J. Flebut, Richmond; R. A. Lamo- 
ree, San Francisco; and D. A. Zannette, 
Palo Alto, to advisory committee on pricing 
of agricultural insecticide and fungicide dusts. 

• L. J. Woodson, San Francisco, to the 
Stock Millwork Jobbers Industry Advisory 
Committee. 



COMPARATIVE STATISTICAL DATA 



Subject: — Factories and Factory Wage-earners and Production (1939). Sc 
U. S. Bureau of Census Reports. Prepared by: — Industrial Department, San Fran- 
cisco Chamber of Commerce. 









Establis 
Number 
2,172 


er ol 
Ra 




Wage-e 

Number 

31.789 

76,375 

77,128 

88.729 

98.123 

275,477 

63,622 

90.324 

287.260 

429,42! 

459.044 

498,668 

7.387.899 

7.886.567 


Ratios 
.40 
.97 
.98 
1.1! 
1.24 
3.49 
.81 
1.15 
!.64 
5.44 
5.82 
6.32 
93.68 
100.0 


Value of 

Products 

Amount 

313.25! 

960. 6!6 

976.674 

1.0-6.449 

1,171,327 

2.798.180 

365. !"4 

636.650 

2.426.178 

5.800.204 

4.175.962 

4.620.037 

52.222.988 

56.843.025 


Ratios 
.55 
1.69 
1.72 
1.89 
2.06 




, lb] 

e. >d 


1 

1 

2 
6 

6 
9 
10 
11 
88 


87 
89 
19 
43 
69 
22 
76 
13 
67 
51 
85 
15 














11 S. F. Bay Area Counc 




4,474 






























































































(a) Alameda. Contra 
Oakland Industrial Area in 
Counties, referred to as Sa 
and Sonoma Counties to th 
when the term "San Ftanc 
by the waterways system c 
Washington. If) Arizona. 
Wyoming. 


On . 

Fran 

Ohio 


Mann. San Francisco a 
s reports, (bl Alameda, 
isco- Oakland Metropolis 
ding group, being parts 
■ Area." is used (dl A 
ng in San Francisco Ba 
ma, Colorado. Idaho. M 


id S.i 

rontr 
n Cm 

, the 
Ids Sa 

. (el 


n Mateo Counties, referred to as the San Francisco- 
Costa. Marin. San Francisco. San Mateo and Solano 
nties in Census reports. Id Adds Napa. Santa Clara 
area constituting an economic entity frequently meant 
cramento and San Joaquin Counties which an- served 
Arizona, California. Idaho. Nevada. Oregon, Utah. 
. Nevada. New Mexico, Oregon. Utah. Washington. 



Hotels Importance to 
Current San Francisco 
Told by Chamber 

The following is a summary of a report on 
the Significance of Hotels in Relation to Cur- 
rent Developments in San Francisco, prepared 
by the San Francisco Chamber of Commerce 
Research Department as supporting evidence 
for Chamber's opposition to possible acquisi- 
tion of some hotels in the city by the War 
Department: 

1. U. S. Bureau of Census release, August 
3, on San Francisco Congested Production 
Area reveals that only 6,720 rooms in hotels 
and dormitories in San Francisco out of 
60,935 were occupied by persons other than 
residents. 

2. To remove 2,500 hotel rooms largely 
occupied by transients would take away 37 
per cent of all the facilities occupied by non- 
residents. 

3. The National Housing Agency revealed 
August 9, that there is only one-tenth of one 
per cent vacancies in 230,000 dwelling units 
in San Francisco, indicating that under such 
acute housing shortage there is no other place 
in the city for hotel residents. 

4. Constant liaison between executives and 
regional offices located in San Francisco and 
their outlying territories and customers bring 
many thousands of businessmen and federal 
officials into the city regularly. 

5. Extent of population turnover is por- 
trayed by the fact that 151,000 residents in 
San Francisco on April 1, 1944, were not 
residents on April 1, 1940. 

6. Transient hotel facilities are a definite 
part of the reception center for in-migrant 
workers seeking local housing facilities. Cur- 
rent local manpower shortage is attributed 
to acute housing situation. Only one out of 
five applicants at the San Francisco War 
Housing Center during 1943 were accom- 
modated with housing facilities. 

7. The available transient facilities are re- 
quired to maintain sufficient population to 
provide manpower for essential war activities. 

Anyone interested may obtain a copy 
of the entire report by calling R. B. 
Koeber, Research Department, San Fran- 
cisco Chamber. 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Thursday, August 17, 1944 



FOREIGN TRADE TIPS 



The Chamber of Commerce cannot undertake to 
guarantee the financial standing and responsibility 
of any firm or individual mentioned in TRADE 
TIPS, and it is suggested that the usual investiga- 
tion be made in each instance. For further details 
regarding an item call the World Trade Depart- 
ment of the San Francisco Chamber of Commerce, 
EXbrook 4511, and refer to inquiry by the Trade 
Tip's number. 

3382 BRAZILIAN TRADE 

Naoonal de Vendas e Publicidade S.A., Rua Xavicr 
de Toledo 114. Sao Paulo, Brazil, desires contact 
with San Francisco exporters for their representation 
in Brazil. 

3383 EXPORTATION TO ECUADOR 

E. Ortiz Robles. Malecon Simon Bolivar 603. Guay- 
aquil, Ecuador, wishes to represent in Ecuador 
manufacturers of various types of merchandise. List 
available at the World Trade Department. 

3384 BUSINESS IN COLOMBIA 

Josi Romero Gitalin, Ayenida 5A, A— Niimero 
1761. Call. Colombia, is anxious to contact firms 
interested in future development of inter-American 
trade, especially with Colombia. 

3385 CUBAN LIQUORS 



3386 RADIO AND AUTOMOTIVE LINES 

P. J. Manlev. 3640 Parramatta Road, Camper- 
down, Sydney, Australia, c/o General Steamship 
Corporation. Ltd.. 465 California Sweet. San Fran- 






in Australia. 

3387 ARGENTINE PRODUCTS 

A great variety of Argentine products, list of them 
available at World Trade Department, are available 
for exporr. Firms that might be interested in this 
matter, may connect with Emilio Brenner, Rivadavia 
532, Buenos Aires. Argentina. 

3388 REPRESENTATION IN CANADA 

J. A. Taggart, 550 Beattv Street. Vancouver, B. C, 
Canada, wants to represenr American manufacturers, 
as brokers, of smokers' sundries, twine, picnic sup- 
plies, shoe polish, ere. 

3389 METAL SLATS FOR VENETIAN BLINDS 
With permission from Washington to import six 
thousand pounds of metal slats for Venenan blinds. 
Jesus Garcia Jr.. Cuathemoc 210 Norte, Monterrey. 
Nuevo Le6n. Mexico, wants contact with some firm 
who can send him that order. 



ith San Fr 

facturers and exporters of all kinds of merchandise 
for their representation in Chile, All replies pertain- 
ing to this matter, should be forwarded to: 5503 
West 8th Street. Los Angeles 36. California. 

3391 EXPORTATION TO INDIA 

Kanialal Moolchand, 8 Sind Market, Bunder Road, 
Karachi, India, wants to be put in touch with im- 
porters of liquors, isinglass, shark liver oil, etc. 

3392 MEXICAN REPRESENTATION 

J. D. Pryor. well-known in San Francisco and in 
Mexico, is leaving for Mexico on September 2, 1944, 
and is available to handle businessmen's interests in 
Mexico. Until September 2. Mr. Pryor may be ad- 
dressed in care of the Office of Tax Collector. Room 
105. Ciry Hall, San Francisco; after that date ad- 
dress him: Mr. J. D. Pryor. Hotel York. Cinco de 
Mayo. Mexico D.F.. Mexico. 

3393 FANCY GOODS AND JEWELRY 

Wm. H. Watson. Sarotonga, Cook Islands, desires 
to export novelty goods and jewelry and seeks con- 
nections with importers of these products. 

3394 ALMOND LIQUEUR 

Erasmo J. Mena. Apartado Postal 654 Mexico D.F., 
Mexico, is interested in the exportation of that 

3395 SALMON AND SARDINES 

Productos Cruz de Oro, Bolivar 374, Monterrey, 
Nuevo Leon, Mexico, wants to buy canned salmon 
and sardines. 

3396 WOODEN TOYS 

Propaganda Moderna, Apartado Postal 1611. Mexico 
D.F.. Mexico, desires to buy exclusively modern roys 
made of wood. 

3397 CUBAN TRADE 

Teodoro Kaufmann, O'Reilly 522 Altos, La Habana, 
Cuba, is interested in the representation of San 
Francisco exporters of hardware, corton and rayon 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

rKKD^rsg 



0,0,0,0, 



Thursday, August 10, 1944, the Board of 
Directors of the San Francisco Chamber of 
Commerce met at the San Francisco Com- 
mercial Club. The following business was 
transacted: 

1. A resolution was adopted urging 
the Civil Aeronautics Board to grant 
certificates to applicants for permission 
to operate additional air service between 
the Hawaiian Islands and the Mainland. 

2. The General Manager reported on 
the status of the hotel survey being 
made by the Army and on small busi- 
ness hearing of Senator Murray's Com- 
mittee. 

3. Nine members of the Senior Coun- 
cil joined the regular board meeting to 
hear a special report from Frank E. 
Marsh, manager of the Washington 
Office of the Chamber. 

4. Gravenstein apples grown in the 
Sebastopol orchards of Oscar A. Hall- 
berg were served. Mr. John Pickett gave 
an account of the importance of apple 
growing in the economy of California. 
Mr. Hallberg and his son were guests 
of the board of directors at the meeting. 



Contribute 

All Waste Paper to 

The Paper Salvage 

Campaign 

The San Francisco Chamber of Commerce 

333 Pine Street, San Francisco 4 

EXbrook 4511 



DOMESTIC TRADETIPS 



A digest of correspondence received from those 
desiring, or offering, lines of metchandise for repre- 
sentation. They are listed here as a setvice without 
necessarily bearing endorsement by the Chambet. 
For further details, contact the Domestic Trade 
Department, EXbrook 4511, Ext. 56. 



the Sai 

and Northern California for their indoor and outdoor 
meral advertising signs. 

D-6041— FREDERICK R. SNYDER, INDUSTRIAL 
REPRESENTATIVES. INC., 711 Gwynnc Building. 
Cincinnati, 2, Ohio, wishes to contact manufacturer desir- 
ous of domestic sales representation. Glyes complete cov 
erage from Gulf to Great Lakes in Middle Western 
States, and also Atlantic Seaboard. Also coyers Latin 
American countries. 

D-6042— JOHN MYERS, SECRETARY, AMERI- 
CAN FLANGE & MANUFACTURING CO.. INC., 
30 Rockefeller Plaza, New York, desires distriburorship in 
this territory for Ferro-Therm, an all metal insulation. 

D6043— H RYNVELD. MARSHALL FOSTER 
PRODUCTS CORP.. 240 Fifth Ayenue. New York City, 
1. wishes local distributing agent for their waste paper 



BOARD MEMBERS AT 
SUPERVISORS' MEETING 

The member of the San Francisco 
Chamber Board of Directors who at- 
tended the Board of Supervisors meet- 
ing, Monday, August 14, was: 

Charles A. Dostal. 



I'ubli 


hed weekly 


at 333 Til 


e St 


, San Francisco, 




. County of San F~r.ni 




California. Will 


Williams, Editor. 


Tclcphiuii 


EXbtook 4511. Sub- 


script 


on. Fifty Cents a \ ca 


(In 


:luded in Annual 


Dues) 


. Entered a 


s Second Class 




1944, 


at the Post 


Office at 




Francisco, Cali- 


fornia 


under the 


let of Mai 


ch 3 


1870. 



Sec. 562 P. L. & R. 

U. S. POSTAGE 
VAc PAIfi 

San Francisco Calif. 
Permit No 1880 



3 398 POWDER PUFFS 

Bavastro. Cozzi y Cia. Bacacay 5175, Buenos Air 
Argenrina, desire to export powder puffs made frc 
goose and duck down for toilet use and vanity cas 
of different kinds. Also arc interested in selling w 
animal furs. Samples and information on oow< 
puffs are available at the World Trade Deparrmei 




2W tectum ^u&ivtete- 

* W PUBLISHED BY THE 

SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 



Volume I 



Thursday, August 24, 1944 



Number 21 



$4,000,000 Apparel Center Slated 
for San Francisco; Will Cover 25 Acres 



Bay Area Residents 
Urged to Vacation 
Here This Summer 

Bay Area residents who have de- 
cided to spend their vacations at 
home this summer rather than to take 
up space on buslines and trains needed 
by the government for the transporta- 
tion of military and naval personnel 
have a wide variety of places to visit, 
according to an announcement by 
Travel Conservation Committee of 
the San Francisco Chamber of Com- 
merce. 

• Places on the peninsula, in Ma- 
rin county, and across the Bay in 
Contra Costa and Alameda counties 
offer attractions which before the war 
drew thousands of visitors from the 
East and MiddleWest. 

Quoting John McLaren, builder 
of Golden Gate Park who said of 
the Peninsula that it has "almost 
every type of scenery that Europe 
boasts" the committee urged Bay 
Area residents to spend this year 
in the Bay Area. 



New Withholding Tax Forms 

Because the 1944 Tax Simplifi- 
cation Act made changes in per- 
sonal exemptions, employers must 
obtain a new withholding tax cer- 
tificate from each employee by 
December 1, 1944. 

• Revised Forms W-4 likely will 
not be available in quantity from the 
office of the Collector of Internal 
Revenue until the forepart of October, 
though some samples may be secured 
from that office for identical repro- 
duction by employers. 

• A new W-2 form, combined with 
a short form return, will be available 
about September 1. 



Equal Opportunities 
Asked For Workers 
in Postwar Jobs Here 

Efforts to retain post-war job op- 
portunities for thousands of Bay Area 
workers at least equal to those pre- 
vailing elsewhere in the country were 
endorsed last week by the San Fran- 
cisco Chamber of Commerce. 

• The campaign, which is being 
conducted by the Northern California 
Labor-Management committee of the 
War Manpower Commission, urges 
reconversion to peacetime production 
on a national scale in order that west- 
ern industry and labor should suffer 
no disadvantage over labor and manu- 
facture in the East. 

• Pointing out that sufficient man- 
power must be retained in the Bay 
Area for essential war work in the 
struggle against Japan, the Chamber 
urged specific measures to give the 
225,000 in-migrant workers of the 
Bay Area opportunities for postwar 
job security equal to those in other 
areas. 

Said Adrien J. Falk, president of 
the Chamber, "If this is not done 
the war effort here will be seri- 
ously hampered." 

• Reconversion — 

Measures suggested by the Cham- 
ber to expedite conversion to peace- 
time production with the least pos- 
sible delay are scheduling of retooling, 
creation of stockpiles, and the per- 
formance of necessary preliminary 
paper work. 

In making these suggestions 
the Chamber advocated the carry- 
ing out of government war pro- 
duction curtailment policies on a 
uniform national basis that will 
give Bay Area workers the maxi- 
mum assurance of peacetime jobs. 



Announcement of a $4,000,000 ap- 
parel center to be erected soon requir- 
ing 25 acres of land for its location 
was made at a luncheon in the St. 
Francis Hotel, Tuesday, August 15. 

The center which will contain 
37 buildings from one to seven 
stories high, in which 10,000 peo- 
ple will work, will be the result of 
a plan of a committee headed by 
Milton Dorman of the Ever Ready 
Products Company. 

• The plan is backed by the Pacific 
Coast Garment Manufacturers Asso- 
ciation of which Fred Pruter is the 
manager. Articles of incorporation 
have been filed by Dorman, Charles 
Fleischman, president of the San Fran- 
cisco Manufacturers and Wholesalers 
Association, and Pruter. 

• Financing of the project is to be 
carried out by the apparel industry 
itself, of which individual firms will 
buy shares of stock at $100 a share 
with one vote going with each share. 
Limit on the amount of stock which 
may be owned by an individual is set 
at $25,000. 

A unique feature of the financ- 
ing is that stock may be sold to 
manufacturers anywhere. It is not 
restricted to those in San Fran- 
cisco or the Bay Area. 

Reason for this, according to Pru- 
ter, is to draw as many manufacturers 
and representatives to San Francisco 
as possible. 

• Construction of the center is to 
begin as soon as materials have been 
made available and the necessary pri- 
orities have been secured. 

Among those present at the 
luncheon Mayor Roger D. Lap- 
ham, Adrien J. Falk, president of 
the San Francisco Chamber of 
Commerce, and Colonel Alexander 
R. Heron sat at the speakers table. 

Apparel City will make San Fran- 
cisco both a style and manufacturing 
center, Pruter said. 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Thursday, August 24, 1944 



Martinez Praises C of C Aid On 
Port Chicago Claims Bill 



Berkeley Chamber Plans 
For Maintenance, High 
Postwar Industry Level 

Urging maintenance of a high level 
of industrial and business activity as 
the first objective in its postwar pro- 
gram, the Berkeley Chamber of Com- 
merce announced last week that a 
prime purpose was the provision of 
job opportunities for a maximum 
number of persons. 
• To attain this end the Berkeley 
Chamber's postwar committee has set 
itself first to stimulate planning ahead 
in all business ranks of the city, 
second, to see to it job supply chan- 
nels are kept open in order to assure 
the greatest number of job possi- 
bilities. 

Practical measures taken by the 
Berkeley committee consist of the 
development of a workpile of " pu t - 
off" jobs, plus the deferring of 
maintenance projects by business 
to be available for peacetime. 

World War II Memorial 
Urged For San Francisco 

Construction of a War Memorial to 
men and women of San Francisco who 
have served in the country's armed 
forces during the present conflict, as 
advocated on the editorial pages of the 
Call-Bulletin recently was commented 
upon this week by Adrien J. Falk, 
president of the San Francisco Cham- 
ber of Commerce, when brought to his 
attention. 

Falk said that the erection of a 
Memorial, to take place at the 
earliest opportunity following the 
return of peace, would not only 
honor "those who have offered 
their lives as the price of victory," 
but would otherwise be of great 
importance to the community. 
• In particular Falk said that if con- 
struction were started immediately at 
the end of the war it would serve as an 
added means of giving employment to 
veterans. 

At the same time Falk urged 
that any memorial constructed be 
so designed as to have practical, 
social and spiritual significance 
which will serve the community, 
thus acting as a continual re- 
minder of the price of victory. 



Thanks for efforts of the San Fran- 
cisco Chamber of Commerce Wash- 
ington office in working for the early 
passage by Congress of H. R. 1542, 
which will allow payment by the Navy 
of Port Chicago blast claims where 
damage had exceeded $1,000 were re- 
ceived this week from the Martinez 
Chamber of Commerce. 

The letter said that the work of 
the San Francisco Chamber's rep- 
resentative had had great "in- 
fluence in making possible the 
good progress of the bill up to 
date." 

• Necessity for passage of the bill, 
which was introduced by Congress- 
man Albert E. Carter, is seen in the 
fact that approximately 5,000 insur- 
ance claims have been filed for com- 
pensation throughout the area. 



Loss of Four Hotels 
Would Cripple City 
According to Report 

Results of a heavily answered sur- 
vey of 605 business establishments in 
San Francisco which has just been 
completed by the Research Department 
of the San Francisco Chamber clearly 
reveal how vitally this city's war effort 
would be crippled if the Army were to 
take over four or five of the hotels. 

• According to the survey of the 
605 firms 76.6% of their total business 
is related to the war effort; 26.1% 
have employees living in the hotels; 
94.2% have executives or customers 
using local hotel accommodations on 
business trips to the city. 

In this last classification 520 
firms reported monthly average 
use of 1026 rooms. 

• One extraordinary feature of the 
survey is that 46.8% of the firms vol- 
untarily commented on the urgency of 
the situation beyond the questions 
asked in the survey. 

Without exception these com- 
ments indicated that the func- 
tioning of the firms would be seri- 
ously hampered if more hotels 
were taken over. 

On the conservative assumption 
that only 25% of the city's firms gen- 
erate the demand for hotel rooms, and 
assuming a smaller number visitors 
for a shorter length of time than is ac- 
tuallv the case, 5685 rooms would be 
required out of the 6720 occupied by 
visitors in the city's hotels. 



Bowles, Tomorrow's Speaker 
Has Newspaper, Advertising 
Background 

Chester Bowles, Administrator of 
the Office of Price Administration, 
who is to speak on the reconversion 
job ahead for business at a San Fran- 
cisco Chamber of Commerce and 
Commercial Club luncheon in the 
Commercial Club, Friday noon, Au- 
gust 25, began his business career as 
a reporter on the famous Springfield 
Republican , according to an announce- 
ment by the OPA office today. 

• Bowles, who was born in Spring- 
field, Massachusetts, was a descend- 
ant of the editor-founder of the Spring- 
field paper. A graduate of Choate I 
School and Vale in the class of '24, 
Bowles, after a few months as a re- 
porter, went to New York to under- 
take merchandising and market re- J 
search. In 1929 he formed the firm of I 
Benton and Bowles and entered the 
advertising business, the announce-1 
ment stated. 

• In 1942 he was appointed stated 
head of tire rationing for Connecticut J 
by Governor Hurley. A few monthsl 
later he established the OPA office in J 
the state and became its first full-time I 
director, the announcement stated. 

In July of 1943 he was appointed 
general manager for OPA through- 
out the entire country, and in 
October succeeded Prentiss Brown 
as price administrator, according 
to the announcement. 



Library Service For 
Businessmen Praised 

Many newcomers to San Francisco's j 
business district do not realize that a| 
well equipped business branch of the! 
Public Library is maintained in Room} 
629 of the Russ Building on Mont-,' 
gomery street, according to R. B.l 
Koeber, manager, San Francisco; 
Chamber Research Department, who, 
says that since its inception it has been! 
a valuable asset to the Chamber and! 
many business firms. 

From Monday through Friday 1 
the Library is open during the 
hours from 9:30 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. 
On Saturdays the hours are from i 
9:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. 



Thursday, August 24, 1944 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Harbor Day Celebration Planned 



Postwar Marketing Meeting 
Here to be Representative 
of Bay Area and West 

Eight thousand industries and busi- 
nesses in the Bay Area and throughout 
the West will be represented at the 
five day conference on postwar mar- 
keting problems of western industry 
which is to open in San Francisco on 
August 28th, according to an an- 
nouncement today by Gene K. 
Walker, conference coordinator. 

Nearly sis hundred sales mana- 
gers and executives are expected to 
attend the sessions which are to 
be held in the auditorium of the 
Pacific Gas and Electric Company 
at 245 Market Street. 

• Participating in the arrange- 
ments for the meeting are the cham- 
bers of commerce of San Francisco, 
Oakland and Berkeley. 

• Among the speakers at the con- 
ference, chief purpose of which is to 
give a clear picture of the latest 
methods being used for building pro- 
ductive sales forces, will be John E. 
McDowell, assistant superintendent 
of the Emporium, and Floyd E. 
Brooker, director of the U. S. Office of 
Education's division of visual aids for 
war training. 



Pajaro Valley Chamber 
Sponsors Area Meeting 

The Chamber of Commerce and 
Agriculture of the Pajaro Valley is 
giving a dinner at the Deer Park 
Tavern near Rio Del Mar on August 
24th for the boards of directors of its 
chamber and the Santa Cruz Chamber 
at which the supervisors of Monterev 
County will be present as guests of the 
directors. 

• Principal speaker at the meeting 
will be Rex Nicholson, managing di- 
rector of the Builders of the West. 

• Purpose of the meeting is to dis- 
cuss further development of industry 
and agriculture in the area. 

Retail Jewelers Conference 

C. J. Christensen, who is this year's 
president of the California Retail Jew- 
elers Association, will be a speaker at 
the 1944 Conference of the American 
National Retail Jewelers Association, 
to be held August 21 to 24 in the 
Waldorf-Astoria in New York City. 

William B. Erb, executive secre- 
tary of the California group, has 
been appointed to the Resolutions 
Committee, and Marcus Rice, of 
Oakland, is to serve on the Creden- 
tials Committee for the event. 



COMPARATIVE STATISTICAL DATA 



Subject: — Wholesale Sales and Population Data. Source: — U. S. 
Census Bureau Reports. Prepared by: — San Francisco Chamber of 
Commerce, Industrial Department. 





Civilian Population 


1939 




Civilian Population 




1940 




W holesale Sales 


1943 










Thous. of 








Area 


Amount 


Ratios 


Dollars 


Ratios 


Amount 


Ratios 


San Francisco County 


630.785 


.5 


1,377,614 


2.49 


685,951 


.5 


5 S. F. Bay Area Counties a 


1.400, 226 


1.1 


1,579,142 


2.86 


1.727,369 


1.4 


6 S. F. Baj' Area Counties b 


1,447.378 


1.1 


1,584.191 


2.87 


1.822,984 


1.4 


9 S. F. Bay Area Counties c 


1,717,234 


1.3 


1.636.087 


2.96 


2,127.117 


1.7 


11 S. F. Bay Area Counties ,c 


) 2,021.211 


1.5 


1.760,640 


3.19 


2,467,090 


1.9 


48 No. Calif. Counties 


3,072,633 


2.3 


1,985,263 


3.59 


3,535,515 


2.8 


Los Angeles County 


2,782.998 


2.1 


1,585,624 


2.87 


3,138,797 


2.5 


10 So. Calif. Counties 


3.795,432 


2.9 


1.854,866 


3.36 


4,346,179 


3.4 


California 


6.868,065 




3,840,129 


6.95 


7,881,694 


6.2 


Oregon 


1.088,284 


.8 


441,310 


.80 


1,172,674 


.9 


Washington . 


1,719,143 


1.3 


767.731 


1.39 


1.905,239 




No. (.at. Ore., Wash. 


5.880.060 


4.5 


3,194,304 


5.78 


6.613,428 


5.2 


Arizona 


497.068 


.4 


96,528 


.18 


569,357 


.5 


New Melico 


530,662 


.4 


66.387 




490,119 


.4 


So. Cal., Ariz.. N. Mei. 


4,823,162 


3.7 


2.017.781 


3.65 


5.405.655 


4.2 


3 Pacific States 


9,675,492 


7.4 


5,049,170 


9.14 


10,959,607 


8.6 


7 Western States ' e 


11,355.852 


8.7 


5,468.629 


9.90 


12,716,339 


10.0 


11 Western States f 


13.808.803 


10.5 


6,137.757 


11.11 


14,979.325 


11.8 


Other 37 States 


117,520,301 


89.5 


49.127.883 


88.89 


112,328,559 


88.2 


Lnited States. . 


131,329,104 


100.0 


55,265,640 


100.00 


127,307,884 


100.0 



,t Alameda. Contra Costa. Marin. San Francisco and San Mateo Counties, referred to as the San Francisco- 
Oakland Industrial Area in Census reports. 

(b) Alameda. Contra Costa, Marin, San Francisco, San Mateo and Solano Counties, referred to as San 
Francisco-Oakland Metropolitan Counties in Census reports. 

(c) Adds N'apa. Santa Clara and Sonoma Counl ' 
an economic entity frequently meant when the tern: 

id i Adds Sacramento and San Joaquin Count] 
San Francisco Bay. 

(e) Arizona, California. Idaho. Nevada. Oregot 

(f) Arizona. California. Colorado, Idah*. Montana. Nevada, 
Wyoming. 



the preceding group, being parts of the : 
San Francisco Bay Area." is used, 
which are served by the waterw*ays system converging i 

. Utah, Washington. 

Mexico, Oregon, Ctah. Wasningtoi 



San Francisco's 15th Annual Harbor 
Day Celebration on August 26 and 27, 
as announced by the San Francisco 
Junior Chamber of Commerce, is due 
to set a high water-mark for such 
events. 

•One highlight of the celebration 
will be the return from a Richmond 
shipyard tour of 300 mayors and civic 
representatives from Northern Cali- 
fornia communities to San Francisco 
via a new Army Transport being de- 
livered from the shipyards. 
•Following docking of the trans- 
port, visiting dignitaries will be given 
a reception and cocktail party pre- 
sided over by Linn Biron, I'SO Junior 
Hostess, who was elected Queen of 
Harbor Day by popular vote in all of 
San Francisco's USO clubs. 

On Saturday, August 26, more 
than 25,000 servicemen and junior 
hostesses are expected to attend 
a huge Military Ball in the Civic 
Auditorium. 

• Music for the event, sponsored by 
Coca Cola Bottling Company of San 
Francisco, is to be furnished by Jan 
Garber and his band, which will be 
heard from coast to coast over a na- 
tional hookup on the Blue Network. 

The Harbor Day Queen and her 
court will be present at the Ball. They 
will also appear at the Water Carnival 
where more than thirty separate 
aquatic events will be combined to 
present a full afternoon of entertain- 
ment to the public. 

• A Water Carnival at the Aquatic 
Park on Sunday, August 27, a Marine 
Exhibit at the Fern- Building and a 
Merchant Seamen's art exhibit at the 
War Memorial Building are also 
among the features of the celebration. 

To stimulate bond buying the 
Army Transportation Corps will 
give rides in its amphibian trucks 
to all bond buyers at x\quatic Park 
on Sunday, August 27. 



Oakland Pepsi-Cola Plant 

Purchase of three and a half acres of 
Oakland industrial property marks 
the first step towards the erection of a 
S500 000 Pepsi-Cola syrup manufac- 
turing plant, according to an an- 
nouncement by the Oakland Chamber 
of Commerce last week which stated 
that headquarters of the Pepsi-Cola 
Company for the 1 1 Western States is 
to be established in the Oakland area. 

Erection of the plant is to be con- 
ducted as a postwar construction 
project. 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Thursday, August 24, 1944 



FOREIGN TRADE TIPS 



The Chamber of Commerce cannot undertake to 
guarantee the financial standing and responsibility 



dual mentioned in TRADE 
suggested that the usual investiga- 
l each instance. For further details 
;m call the World Trade Depart- 
i Francisco Chamber of Commerce, 
inquiry by the Trade 



of any firi 
TIPS, and it . 
don be made 
regarding an 
ment of the S 
EXbrook: 4511, and ref< 
Tip's number. 

3399 EXPORTATION TO ARGENTINA 

Camara Argentina de Comercio, Avenida de 
Mayo 560. Buenos Aires, Argentina, desires con- 
tact with San Francisco manufacturers of por- 
celain, chinaware. cutlery and toys, interested \n 
the exportation of these products to Argentina. 

3400 CUBAN CIGARS 

Oscar C Tuya, Apartado Postal 2oS. La Habana. 
Cuba, wants to be put in touch with importers of 
Cuban cigars and with brokers who wculd be in- 
terested in handling that line, on a commission 

BUSINESS WITH AUSTRALIA 

R. H. William-un, Suite $04. Belgenny. Taylor 
Square. N.S.W. Australia, is interested in repre- 



34 ■ 



senting San Francis 

porters of men's cloth ng and 

3402 PRESS FOR STENCILING IMPRESSIONS 
ON WOODEN BOXES 

Jabones Vergara S.A.. Apartado Postal 1373, 
Guadalajara. Jalfcco. Mexico, desires to obtain 
a press for making stencil impressions on wooden 
boxes for packing oap- 

3403 REPRESENTATION IN ARGENTINA 
Segismundo U.Z. Steinmetz, Calle Montevideo 
760, Buenos Aires. Argentina, seeks the repre- 
sentation of San Francisco exporters of gloves, 
handbags, clips, novelties, textiles, etc. 

3404 SWISS CHEESE 

Swiss cheese exporters are revising their postwar 
plans with a view to adjusting their export quotas 
for the United States, particularly in an effort to 
increase their direct shipments to the Pacific 
Coast. Importers of Swiss cheese (Emmental, 
Gmyere, etc.) who wish to apply for agency con- 
nections are therefore requested to communicate 
with the Consulate of Switzerland, 100 Bush 
Street. San Francisco. California. EXbrook 4554. 

3405 IRON SILOS 

Gonzalo Lourido y Cia.. Ltda.. Calle 11 Norte. 
1-9. Cali. Colombia, are interested 
with manufacturers of iron silos for the 
tion of rice, corn, beans, etc. 

3406 INDUSTRIAL TALCS 

Hermanos Tupino Aguero. S.A., Avenida Argen- 
tina 1802, Lima. Peru, want contact with manu- 
facturers of industrial talcs. 

3407 FOOD PRODUCTS 

J. Luis Cisneros. Apartado Postal Numero 296. La 
Habana. Cuba, is interested in representing 
manufacturers and exporters of all kinds of food 
products in Cuba. 

3408 TRADE WITH AUSTRALIA 

P. Worboys, c-o St. Francis Hotel. San Fran- 
cisco, California, manager director of Sydney 
Importing Co., Pty.. Ltd.. 521-523 Kent Street. 
Sydney. Australia, enroute home from a govern- 
ment mission, available for two or three days to 
interview manufacturers and exporters with 
view to securing products for distribution in 
Australia. That company engages in business as 
general import merchants. Lines of particular 
i, fancy goods, 

3409 REPRESENTATION IN ECUADOR 

Alfonso H. Delgado y Co., Apartado Postal 1108. 
Guayaquil. Ecuador, are anxious to contact 
manufacturers who require representation in 
Ecuador, on a sales commission basis. 



SPECIAL NOTICE: The Brazilian Government 
Trade Bureau. 551 Fifth Avenue, New York 17, N.Y., 
has supplied the World Trade Department Office with 
two copies of the Brazilian Bulletin in Portuguese, 
which contain trade opportunities and other valuable 
trade information. Those interested may see the bulle- 
tin by calling at the World Trade Department Office. 



Published weekly at Si3 Pine St., San Francisco, 
Zone 4, County of San Francisco, California, Will 
Williams, Editor. Telephone EXbrook 4511. Sub- 
scription. Fifty Cents a Year (Included in Annua) 
Dues). Entered as Second Class matter April 26, 
1944, at the Post Office at San Francisco, Cali- 
fornia, under the act of March 3, 1870. 



Imports Stockpiling, Foreign 
Trade Promotion Urges C of C 



Enunciated as San Francisco Chamber 
of Commerce policies are here presented 
recommendations advanced by the Post- 
war Planning Committee for Foreign 
Trade, cleared with the Foreign Trade 
Committee and approved by the Cham- 
ber's Board of Directors, covering two 
more of a series of Declarations of 
Policy: 

• Stockpiling — "We favor the stock- 
piling of goods of foreign origin which 
are essential to the military require- 
ments of the United States. We be- 
lieve that the kind and quantity of 
goods so stockpiled should be deter- 
mined by the appropriate military 
branches of the government. Where 
goods so acquired are of a perishable 
or semi-perishable nature requiring 
replacement from time to time, we 
believe that stocks so released should 
be distributed through the regular 
channels of trade and handled in such 
a manner as not to disturb the orderly 
marketing of similar goods in private 
hands. 

"Stockpiled commodities ob- 
tained from countries with lend- 
lease debits due the United States 
should be credited to lend-lease 
account to the extent that such 



BOARD MEMBERS AT 
SUPERVISORS' MEETING 

The member of the San Fran- 
cisco Chamber Board of Direc- 
tors who attended the Board of 
Supervisors meeting, Monday, 
August 21 was: 

Thos. J. Lenehan. 



The San Francisco Chamber of Commerce 



333 Pine Street, 
EXbrook 45 11 



Francisco 4 



credits do not seriously handicap 
flow of United States exports to 
those countries, nor run contrary 
to Article VII, United States- 
United Kingdom Mutual-Aid 
Agreement." 

• Foreign Trade Promotion — "We 
observe that a great many business- 
men in this country, as well as the 
majority of the general public, are 
little aware of the fact that the main- 
tenance of the standard of living on a 
basis commensurate with the large 
resources of this country is dependent 
upon the volume of our foreign trade. 

"In order to bring about a bet- 
ter understanding of this fact we 
recommend that comprehensive 
educational programs on a na- 
tional scale be adopted and car- 
ried out by all foreign trade or- 
ganizations and kindred groups in 
this country. 

"Emphasis should be laid upon the 
necessity of holding production costs 
within the range of international cost 
levels in order to insure at all times a 
maximum volume of export trade for 
the United States and thereby pro- 
moting our own economic welfare. 

"Equal stress should be laid also on 
imports from foreign countries as the 
most effective means of providing the 
countries of supply with the necessary 
dollar exchange to pay for our exports 
to them, and also on the fact that im- 
ports of goods more economically pro- 
duced in foreign countries than in our 
own will tend to increase the general 
standard of living in this country. The 
United States being a creditor nation, 
imports are indispensable for correct- 
ing our presently unbalanced inter- 
national credit position." 




^><zu Beaton 18u4we&x, 

* W PUBLISHED BY THE 

SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 



Volume I 



Thursday, August 31, 1944 



Number 22 



Five Talks, and Panel 
Discussion Scheduled 
As Conference Closes 

"The Teaching Process" will be the 
subject Thursday at the five-day sales 
managers conference on postwar mar- 
seting problems of western industry 
now being held in San Francisco at 
the Pacific Gas and Electric Com- 
pany's auditorium at 245 Market 
Street. 

The conference, attended by 
aver 500 sales managers and com- 
pany executives, is sponsored by 
the Sales Managers Council for 
Economic Development, formed 
by the Sales Managers Club and 
the San Francisco Sales Managers 
Association. 

• On the final day, tomorrow, of the 
conference two talks will be given and 
a panel discussion will be held with 
Gene K. Walker acting as moderator. 

• Subject that will be dealt with in 
the talks will be methods of keeping 
salesmen "hitting the ball", and the 
possibilities of training dealers and 
jobbers. 

Following a talk by George S. 
Jones, Jr., vice president in charge 
of sales, Servel, Inc., A. O. Malm- 
berg, director of the Doughnut 
Corporation of America, will 
speak on "The Art of Human 
Leadership". 



Statistical Exhibit Filed With 
CAB For West Coast Case 



Don't Travel Campaign 
Proves Successful, 
State Chamber Reveals 

Highlights of a meeting called by 
i lie War Service Sub-Committee of 
the California State Chamber of Com- 
merce regarding the effectiveness of 
the program to curtail non-essential 
travel revealed that as far as civilian 
travel is concerned there has been a 
definite decrease since the campaign 
opened in mid-July. 

The campaign is being partici- 
pated in by Chambers of Com- 
merce throughout the Bay Area 
and Northern California with the 
San Francisco Chamber laying 
special emphasis on vacationing 
at home during the summer 
months. 

But though Arthur Scott of the 
Great Northern Railway and S. E. 
Porter of the Santa Fe agreed that 
civilian travel had dropped it was re- 
ported that since August first travel 
inquiries jumped to the all time high 
for the year. 

In this case, however, Al Kohn 
of Southern Pacific and other rail 
executives indicated that the in- 
creased calls came from service 
families and men on furlough. 



Volunteers Needed byPortSecurity Force 



An intensive recruiting campaign 
has been underway for some time to 
complete the San Francisco regiment 
of the Coast Guard's Volunteer Port 
Security Force. 

• Especially needed are men who 
will stand daytime watches and mid- 
night to 6 a.m. watches. 

"Volunteers guard ships and 
other port facilities against sabo- 
tage and espionage, relieving regu- 



lar Coast Guardsmen for badly 
needed sea duty," states Lt. (jgj 
VVm. H. Brock, Jr., Information 
& Recruiting Officer. "Food, uni- 
forms, shoes, caps, underwear, 
shirts, and other equipment are 
furnished free." 

• Recruiting is taking place at Coast 
Guard Headquarters. 244 California 
Street. Further information may be 
obtained by calling EXbrook 421,-i, 
Extension 7. 



A statistical exhibit has been filed 
with the Civil Aeronautics Board by 
the San Francisco Chamber of Com- 
merce through Walter A. Rohde, man- 
ager, Transportation Department, 
with the request that it be made part 
of the record in the West Coast case. 

• This case covers twenty-three ap- 
plicants who are asking for rights to 
establish new air services or addi- 
tional services to more than 450 com- 
munities in the six western states. In- 
cluded are some thirty-one proposals 
for new routes or extensions that di- 
rectly concern San Francisco. 

The Chamber's exhibit does not 
express preference for any par- 
ticular applicant or type of service. 
It is merely designed to indicate 
to the Civil Aeronautics Board the 
commercial importance of San 
Francisco and its relationship 
with the other communities in- 
volved, Rohde states. 

• The hearing will commence No- 
vember 1, in Room 402, San Fran- 
cisco Civic Auditorium. 



Contract Termination 

The basic document under which 
the Maritime Commission will termi- 
nate and settle war contracts has just 
been issued. 

• Entitled General Order 57, it is 
aligned with features contained in the 
recent Contract Settlement Act. and 
should be of interest to all Maritime 
Commission contractors and subcon- 
tractors. 

• Currently, copies are not available 
locally outside of the Federal Register 
of August 12 (FR44-120.>5 I , though, 
presumably they may be obtained 
from the Procurement Division. U.S. 
Maritime Commission. Washington, 
25, D. C. 

Previously, Maritime Commis- 
sion terminations have been han- 
dled under Administration Order 
No. 79 which is now being revised 
to conform with G. O. 57. 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Thursday, August 31, 1944 



Postwar Project Hearing Held 
In Oakland by State Group 



Local Stores Awarded 
First and Fourth Prize 
For War Bond Displays 

Prizes in a nationwide window dis- 
play contest in connection with the 
Fifth War Loan campaign were won 
by the window displays of two San 
Francisco merchants, according to a 
recent article in a national trade jour- 
nal. 

• First prize of $500 in war bonds 
was won by Alton J. Bernhard, dis- 
play manager of Joseph Magnin Co., 
and Richard B. Gump of Gump's, 
took fourth place with a prize of $100. 

The contest drew hundreds of 
entries from every state in the 
Union and from Hawaii. It was 
sponsored by the National As- 
sociation of Display Industries, 
which contributed the prizes, and 
Display World. 

• Plans for a similar display con- 
test are in preparation for the Sixth 
War Loan Drive, which is to take 
place in November. At that time 
prizes will total as much as $150,000. 



Classified Organization Lists 
Available at S. F. Chamber 

Current classified lists of more than 
1,000 active organizations, the pre- 
ponderance of which have their head- 
quarters in San Francisco or in the 
immediate area, are now available at 
the Research Department of the San 
Francisco Chamber. 

Maintenance of liaison between 
the many existing organizations 
is a service carried on by the Re- 
search Department through the 
cooperation of the organizations. 

• In addition to providing an up- 
to-date card file of each separate or- 
ganization, the department compiles 
classified lists at regular intervals 
which give the organization name, 
headquarters address, telephone num- 
ber, and the president's and secre- 
tary's name, address, and telephone 
number. 

• These lists are segregated into 
11 groups, namely: Agriculture; Busi- 
ness; Civic and Improvement; For- 
eign; Government and Political; In- 
dustrial and Trade; Luncheon; Mili- 
tary; Professional; Religious, Social 
and Historical; and Transportation. 



Officials from communities through- 
out the Bay Area gathered in Oakland 
last week to attend a hearing of the 
California Reconstruction and Re- 
employment Commission in which it 
was revealed that San Francisco has 
under consideration 2,000 postwar 
projects totaling $3,000,000,000. 

In addition to the San Francisco 
postwar projects, Mayor John 
Slavich of Oakland told the com- 
mission of a suggession by Build- 
ers of the West, Inc. for construct- 
ing another bay bridge paralleling 
the present structure and costing 
more than $80,000,000. 

• Thomas M. Carlson of Rich- 
mond told the commission that his 
community is anxious to know what 
the intentions of Government are re- 
garding a restoration of normal con- 
ditions in Richmond. 

• Louis B. Lundborg, general man- 
ager of the San Francisco Chamber, 
reviewed the history of San Francisco 
"Work Pile" plan, emphasizing the 
need for translating specific reports 
of jobs into real jobs. 

G. L. Fox, manager of the Cham- 
ber's Industrial Department, in 
addition to warning against pub- 
licity which could adversely affect 
the industrial prospects of the re- 
gion, gave concrete examples of 
cooperation on a Bay Area-wide 
basis and recounted instances of 
new industrial establishments lo- 
cating here. 



Fiftieth Anniversary, 
San Mateo, Feted 

The Fiftieth Anniversary of the 
founding of San Mateo will take place 
Sunday, September 3, when a "Vic- 
tory Harvest Fair" will be held in the 
San Mateo City Park, according to 
an announcement by the San Mateo 
Chamber of Commerce. 
• Program for the day, which starts 
at 9 in the morning with an exhibition 
of San Mateo garden produce, is to in- 
clude speeches by Congressman John 
Z. Anderson, acting mayor Richard T. 
McAllister and other city and county 
officials, plus a concert by a navy 
band and a United States Navy drill. 

During the day games are sched- 
uled. Program for the evening will 
contain boxing and tumbling 
events, a band concert and pres- 
entation to the city of a drinking 
fountain by the San Mateo Cham- 
ber of Commerce. 



Retailers "Third Army" War 
Bond Sales Successes Told 

Total amount of "E" bonds sold by 
the Retailers' "Third Army" during 
the 5th War Loan drive amounted to 
over $7,000,000 for the San Francisco 
sector, according to the Retail Mer- 
chants Association of the Chamber of 
Commerce today. 

Nearest approach to the San Fran- 
cisco record for Northern California 
was made in the Oakland Sector with 
a total slightly over $4,000,000. 

• In Oakland, however, 255 persons 
attained the rank of Four Star Gen- 
erals which is given for selling over , 
$5,000 worth of bonds in the "E"| 
denomination. 

San Franciscans reaching the Four 
Star rank numbered 247. 



Santa Clara Company 
Receives "A" Award 

According to information received 
from the Santa Clara Chamber of 
Commerce, the Santa Clara Frosted 
Foods Company has just won the 
"A" award of the War Foods Ad-' 
ministration. 

"This is just recognition of the mu- 
tual patriotic effort during the 1943- 
1944 season which increased the quan- 
tity and quality of your production 
and maintained rich standards of effi- 
ciency, health, sanitation and labor 
management cooperation," stated' 
Charles Smith, regional director, Of-I 
fice of Distribution, WFA. 

"As far as we know," said F. 
B. Keip, secretary Santa Clara 
Chamber, "this is the only Frosted 
Food Company thus far receiving . 
this award." 



Berkeley Cof C Area-Wide Plan 

A Bay Area-wide publicity, adver- 
tising, and promotion campaign, fi- 
nanced from city, county and private 
funds under the name "Golden Gate 
Associated" has been proposed by the- 
Berkeley Chamber of Commerce as'" 
a major undertaking in the post- 
war development of the San Fran- 
cisco Bay Area. 

• Author of the Berkeley Chamber 
plan is Raymond M. Young, former 
president and present postwar conw 
mittee chairman. 

• The plan contemplates the carry- 1 
ing forward of industrial, tourist and! 
residential promotion on a Bay-wide 
basis. 



Thursday, August 31, 1944 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Trans-Pacific 
Representation 

San Francisco Bay Area manu- 
facturers who may be interested 
in having their products mer- 
chandised in the Territory of 
Hawaii are invited to communi- 
cate with the Chamber's In- 
dustrial Department, EXbrook 
4511, if they want further in- 
formation concerning a highly 
competent merchandising organ- 
ization which desires to add Bay 
Area lines. 



Bay Area Men Named 
To OPA Positions 

Two Bay Region men were recently 
appointed to Office of Price Adminis- 
tration posts. 

• Franklin Gindick, of Sacramento 
and Berkeley, has been named acting 
head of the Fresh Fruit and Vegetable 
Section of the Food Price Division of 
the OPA. 

• Sylvian Mirsky, San Francisco, 
has been appointed to an industry 
advisory committee for securing more 
effective price control for candy. 

• Lionel Shatz, San Francisco, has 
been named secretary and treasurer 
of the OPA Fresh and Frozen Fish 
Industry Advisory Committee. 



Veterans Information 
Center Proposed For 
Oakland by Belgrano 

Establishment of a Veterans' Infor- 
mation Center in Oakland in which all 
organizations and groups interested 
in veterans' welfare will be given desk 
space was proposed recently by Frank 
N. Belgrano, Jr., chairman of the 
Veterans' Welfare Committee of the 
Oakland Postwar Planning Commit- 
tee, according to a recent announce- 
ment by the Oakland Chamber of 
Commerce. 

• The proposal calls for the erec- 
tion of a temporary building on the 
Oakland City Hall Plaza to serve re- 
turning veterans of World War II 
during the period of demobilization. 

If the proposal wins the ap- 
proval of the city-wide postwar 
planning group it will be submit- 
ted to Mayor John F. Slavich and 
the Oakland City Council for im- 
mediate consideration. 

Under recent orders of the Ad- 
ministrator of Retraining and Reem- 
ployment Administration, Office of 
War Mobilization, an Alameda 
County Veterans' Service Committee 
has been appointed composed of Lt. 
Col. Howard P. Whitten, of Selective 
Service; Earl A. Miller, U. S. Employ- 
ment Service; and Lt. Col. Charles 
P. Murphy, Veterans' Administra- 
ion. 



COMPARATIVE STATISTICAL DATA 



Subject: — Land Area and 1943 Population Data. Source: — U. S. Census 
Bureau Reports. Prepared By: — Industrial Department, San Francisco 
Chamber of Commerce. 



Civilian Populatio 



Land Area (1940) 

Area Sq. Miles Ratios 

San Francisco County 45 .0015 

5 S. F. Bay Area Counties a 2,487 .084 

6 S. F. Bay Area Counties b) 3,314 .111 

9 S. F. Bay Area Counties ,c j 6,988 .235 

11 S. F. Bay Area Counties «J) 9,383 .315 

48 No. Calif. Counties 93.235 3.132 

Los Angeles County 4,071 .137 

10 So. Calif. Counties 63,568 2.135 

California 156,803 5.267 

Oregon 96,350 3.236 

Washington 66,977 2.250 

No. Cal., Ore., Wash 256,562 8.618 

Arizona 113,580 3.815 

New Mexico 121,511 4.081 

So. Cal., Ariz., N. Mei 298,659 10.032 

3 Pacific States 320,130 10.753 

7 Western States fe) 708,666 23.804 

11 Western States if 1,177,966 39.567 

Other 37 States 1,799,162 60.433 

United States 2,977,128 100.0 



da. Contra Costa, Marin, San Francisco and San Mateo Counties, referred to as the San Francisco- 
Oakland Industrial Area in Census reports. ibi.Uameda. Contra Costa, Marin, San Francisco, San Mateo and 
referred to as San Francisco-Oakland Metropolitan Counties in Census reports, (c)Adds Napa, 

Santa Clara and Sonoma Counties to the preceding group, being pans of the area constituting an economic entity 
frequently meant when the term "San Frandsco Bay Area", is used. (d)Adds Sacramento and San Joaquin Coun- 
ties which are served by the waterways system converging in San Francisco Bay. (e)Arizona, California. Idaho. 



Amount 


Ratios 


685,951 


.5 


1,727,369 


1.4 


1,822,984 


1.4 


2,127.117 


1.7 


2,467,090 


1.9 


3,535,515 


2.8 


3,138.797 


2.5 


4,346,179 


3.4 


7,881,694 


6.2 


1.172,674 


.9 


1,905,239 


1.5 


6,613.428 


5.2 


569,357 


.5 


490,119 


.4 


5,405,655 


4.2 


10,959,607 


8.6 


12,716,339 


10.0 


14,979,325 


11.8 


112,328,559 


88.2 


127,307,884 


100.0 



, California, Colorado, Idaho, Montana. Xevada, New Mexico, 



U.S.-United Kingdom 
Mutual-Aid Agreement 
Favored by C of C 

Based on a recommendation ad- 
vanced by its Postwar Planning Com- 
mittee for Foreign Trade, the San 
Francisco Chamber of Commerce has 
enunciated the following Declaration 
of Policy: 

"United States-United King- 
dom Mutual-Aid Agreement — As 
a guiding policy in our interna- 
tional economic relations, and in 
our country's best interests as re- 
gards our domestic economic wel- 
fare, we urge the fullest public 
support be given to the principles 
enunciated by Article VII, United 
States-United Kingdom Mutual- 
Aid Agreement : 

" 'In the final determination of the 
benefits to be provided to the United 
States of America by the Government 
of the United Kingdom in return 
for aid furnished under the Act of 
Congress of March 11, 1941, the terms 
and conditions thereof shall be such as 
not to burden commerce between the 
two countries, but to promote mutu- 
ally advantageous economic relations 
between them and the betterment of 
world-wide economic relations. To 
that end, they shall include provision 
for agreed action by the United States 
of America and the United Kingdom, 
open to participation by all other 
countries of like mind, directed to the 
expansion, by appropriate interna- 
tional and domestic measures, of pro- 
duction, employment, and the ex- 
change and consumption of goods, 
which are the material foundations of 
the liberty and welfare of all peoples ; 
to the elimination of all forms of 
discriminatory treatment in interna- 
tional commerce, and to the reduction 
of tariffs and other trade barriers; 
and, in general, to the attainment of 
all the economic objectives set forth 
in the Joint Declaration made on 
August 12, 1941, by the President of 
the United States of America and the 
Prime Minister of the United King- 
dom. 

" 'At an early convenient date, con- 
versations shall be begun between the 
two Governments with a view to de- 
termining, in the light of governing 
economic conditions, the best means 
of attaining the above-stated objec- 
tives by their own agreed action and 
of seeking the agreed action of other 
like-minded Governments.' 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Thursday, August 31, 1944 



Postwar Project Hearing Held 
In Oakland by State Group 



Local Stores Awarded 
First and Fourth Prize 
For War Bond Displays 

Prizes in a nationwide window dis- 
play contest in connection with the 
Fifth War Loan campaign were won 
by the window displays of two San 
Francisco merchants, according to a 
recent article in a national trade jour- 
nal. 

• First prize of $500 in war bonds 
was won by Alton J. Bernhard, dis- 
play manager of Joseph Magnin Co., 
and Richard B. Gump of Gump's, 
took fourth place with a prize of $100. 

The contest drew hundreds of 
entries from every state in the 
Union and from Hawaii. It was 
sponsored by the National As- 
sociation of Display Industries, 
which contributed the prizes, and 
Display World. 

• Plans for a similar display con- 
test are in preparation for the Sixth 
War Loan Drive, which is to take 
place in November. At that time 
prizes will total as much as §150,000. 



Classified Organization Lists 
Available at S. F. Chamber 

Current classified lists of more than 
1,000 active organizations, the pre- 
ponderance of which have their head- 
quarters in San Francisco or in the 
immediate area, are now available at 
the Research Department of the San 
Francisco Chamber. 

Maintenance of liaison between 
the many existing organizations 
is a service carried on by the Re- 
search Department through the 
cooperation of the organizations. 

• In addition to providing an up- 
to-date card file of each separate or- 
ganization, the department compiles 
classified lists at regular intervals 
which give the organization name, 
headquarters address, telephone num- 
ber, and the president's and secre- 
tary's name, address, and telephone 
number. 

• These lists are segregated into 
11 groups, namely: Agriculture; Busi- 
ness; Civic and Improvement; For- 
eign; Government and Political; In- 
dustrial and Trade; Luncheon; Mili- 
tary; Professional; Religious, Social 
and Historical; and Transportation. 



Officials from communities through- 
out the Bay Area gathered in Oakland 
last week to attend a hearing of the 
California Reconstruction and Re- 
employment Commission in which it 
was revealed that San Francisco has 
under consideration 2,000 postwar 
projects totaling $3,000,000,000. 

In addition to the San Francisco 
postwar projects, Mayor John 
Slavich of Oakland told the com- 
mission of a suggession by Build- 
ers of the West, Inc. for construct- 
ing another bay bridge paralleling 
the present structure and costing 
more than $80,000,000. 

• Thomas M. Carlson of Rich- 
mond told the commission that his 
community is anxious to know what 
the intentions of Government are re- 
garding a restoration of normal con- 
ditions in Richmond. 

• Louis B. Lundborg, general man- 
ager of the San Francisco Chamber, 
reviewed the history of San Francisco 
"Work Pile" plan, emphasizing the 
need for translating specific reports 
of jobs into real jobs. 

G. L. Fox, manager of the Cham- 
ber's Industrial Department, in 
addition to warning against pub- 
licity which could adversely affect 
the industrial prospects of the re- 
gion, gave concrete examples of 
cooperation on a Bay Area-wide 
basis and recounted instances of 
new industrial establishments lo- 
cating here. 



Fiftieth Anniversary, 
San Mateo, Feted 

The Fiftieth Anniversary of the 
founding of San Mateo will take place 
Sunday, September 3, when a "Vic- 
tory Harvest Fair" will be held in the 
San Mateo City Park, according to 
an announcement by the San Mateo 
Chamber of Commerce. 
• Program for the day, which starts 
at 9 in the morning with an exhibition 
of San Mateo garden produce, is to in- 
clude speeches by Congressman John 
Z. Anderson, acting mayor Richard T. 
McAllister and other city and county 
officials, plus a concert by a navy 
band and a United States Navy drill. 

During the day games are sched- 
uled. Program for the evening will 
contain boxing and tumbling 
events, a band concert and pres- 
entation to the city of a drinking 
fountain by the San Mateo Cham- 
ber of Commerce. 



Retailers "Third Army" War 
Bond Sales Successes Told 

Total amount of "E" bonds sold by 
the Retailers' "Third Army" during 
the 5th War Loan drive amounted to 
over $7,000,000 for the San Francisco 
sector, according to the Retail Mer- 
chants Association of the Chamber of 
Commerce today. 

Nearest approach to the San Fran- 
cisco record for Northern California 
was made in the Oakland Sector with 
a total slightly over $4,000,000. 

• In Oakland, however, 255 persons 
attained the rank of Four Star Gen- 
erals which is given for selling over 
$5,000 worth of bonds in the "E" 
denomination. 

San Franciscans reaching the Four 
Star rank numbered 247. 



Santa Clara Company 
Receives "A" Award 

According to information received t 
from the Santa Clara Chamber of ! 
Commerce, the Santa Clara Frosted! 
Foods Company has just won the] 
"A" award of the War Foods Ad- J 
ministration. 

"This is just recognition of the mu-. 
tual patriotic effort during the 1943- j 
1944 season which increased the quan- 
tity and quality of your production 
and maintained rich standards of effi- 
ciency, health, sanitation and labor 
management cooperation," stated 
Charles Smith, regional director, Of-j 
fice of Distribution, WFA. 

"As far as we know," said F. 
B. Keip, secretary Santa Clara 
Chamber, "this is the only Frosted 
Food Company thus far receiving 
this award." 



Berkeley Cof C Area-Wide Plan 

A Bay Area-wide publicity, adver- 
tising, and promotion campaign, fi- 
nanced from city, county and private 
funds under the name "Golden Gate- 
Associated" has been proposed by the- 
Berkeley Chamber of Commerce asl 
a major undertaking in the post-| 
war development of the San Fran- 
cisco Bay Area. 

• Author of the Berkeley Chamber 
plan is Raymond M. Young, formen 
president and present postwar com4 
mittee chairman. 

• The plan contemplates the carry* 
ing forward of industrial, tourist and) 
residential promotion on a Bay-wide 
basis. 



Thursday, August 31, 1944 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Trans-Pacific 
Representation 

San Francisco Bay Area manu- 
facturers who may be interested 
in having their products mer- 
chandised in the Territory of 
Hawaii are invited to communi- 
cate with the Chamber's In- 
dustrial Department. EXbrook 
4511, if they want further in- 
formation concerning a highly 
competent merchandising organ- 
ization which desires to add Bay 
Area lines. 



Bay Area Men Named 
To OPA Positions 

Two Bay Region men were recently 
appointed to Office of Price Adminis- 
tration posts. 

• Franklin Gindick, of Sacramento 
and Berkeley, has been named acting 
head of the Fresh Fruit and Vegetable 
Section of the Food Price Division of 
the OPA. 

• Sylvian Mirsky, San Francisco, 
has been appointed to an industry 
advisory committee for securing more 
effective price control for candy. 

• Lionel Shatz, San Francisco, has 
been named secretary and treasurer 
of the OPA Fresh and Frozen Fish 
Industrv Advisory Committee. 



Veterans Information 
Center Proposed For 
Oakland by Belgrano 

Establishment of a Veterans' Infor- 
mation Center in Oakland in which all 
organizations and groups interested 
in veterans' welfare will be given desk 
space was proposed recently by Frank 
X. Belgrano, Jr., chairman of the 
Veterans' Welfare Committee of the 
Oakland Postwar Planning Commit- 
tee, according to a recent announce- 
ment by the Oakland Chamber of 
Commerce. 

• The proposal calls for the erec- 
tion of a temporary building on the 
Oakland City Hall Plaza to serve re- 
turning veterans of World War II 
during the period of demobilization. 

If the proposal wins the ap- 
proval of the city-wide postwar 
planning group it will be submit- 
ted to Mayor John F. Slavich and 
the Oakland City Council for im- 
mediate consideration. 

Under recent orders of the Ad- 
ministrator of Retraining and Reem- 
ployment Administration, Office of 
War Mobilization, an Alameda 
County Veterans' Service Committee 
has been appointed composed of Lt. 
Col. Howard P. Whitten, of Selective 
Service; Farl A. Miller, U. S. Employ- 
ment Service; and Lt. Col. Charles 
P. Murphy, Veterans' Administra- 
ion. 



COMPARATIVE STATISTICAL DATA 



Subject: — Land Area and 1943 Population Data. Source: — U. S. Census 
Bureau Reports. Prepared By: — Industrial Department, San Francisco 
Chamber of Commerce. 



Land Area (1940) 

Area Sq. Miles Ratios 

San Francisco County 45 .0015 

5 S. F. Bay Area Counties a i 2.487 .084 

6 S. F. Bay Area Counties lb 3,314 .111 

9 S. F. Bay Area Counties c 6.988 .235 

11 S. F. Bay Area Counties d 9,383 .315 

48 No. Calif. Counties 93,235 3.132 

Los Angeles County 4,071 .137 

10 So. Calif. Counties 63,568 2.135 

California 156,803 5.267 

Oregon 96,350 3.236 

Washington 66,977 2.250 

No. Cal., Ore., Wash 256,562 8.618 

Arizona 113.580 3.815 

New Mexico 121,511 4.081 

So. Cal.. Ariz., N. Mel. 298,659 10.032 

3 Pacific States 320,130 10.753 

7 Western States ie) 708,666 23.804 

11 Western States if 1,177,966 39.567 

Other 37 States 1,799,162 60.433 

United States 2,977,128 100.0 



Amount 


Ratios 


685,951 


,5 


1,727,369 


1.4 


1,822,984 


1.4 


2,127,117 


1.7 


2,467,090 


1.9 


3,535,515 


2.8 


3,138,797 


2.5 


4,346,179 


3.4 


7,881,694 


6.2 



10,959,607 


8.6 


12,716,339 


10.0 


14,979,325 


11.8 


112,328,559 


88.2 


127,307,884 


100.0 



he San Frantisco- 
i, San Mateo and 

unties, referred toasS I tekland Metropolitan Counties in Census reports. v clAdds Napa. 

Santa Clara and Sonoma Counties to the preceding group, being parts of the area constituting an economic entity 
frequently meant when the term "San Francisco Bay Area", is u^ed. tdjAdds Sacramento and San Joaquin Coun- 
ties which are served by the waterways system converging in San Francisco Bay. (elArizona. California. Idaho, 
Nevada. Oregon, Utah. \\ "ashingiun. [f)Arizooa, California, Colorado. Idaho. Montana. Nevada, New Mexico. 
Oregon. Utah. Washington. Wyoming. 



U.S.-United Kingdom 
Mutual-Aid Agreement 
Favored by C of C 

Based on a recommendation ad- 
vanced by its Postwar Planning Com- 
mittee for Foreign Trade, the San 
Francisco Chamber of Commerce has 
enunciated the following Declaration 
of Policy: 

"United States-United King- 
dom Mutual-Aid Agreement — As 
a guiding policy in our interna- 
tional economic relations, and in 
our country's best interests as re- 
gards our domestic economic wel- 
fare, we urge the fullest public 
support be given to the principles 
enunciated by Article VII, United 
States-United Kingdom Mutual- 
Aid Agreement : 

" 'In the final determination of the 
benefits to be provided to the United 
States of America by the Government 
of the United Kingdom in return 
for aid furnished under the Act of 
Congress of March 11, 1941, the terms 
and conditions thereof shall be such as 
not to burden commerce between the 
two countries, but to promote mutu- 
ally advantageous economic relations 
between them and the betterment of 
world-wide economic relations. To 
that end, they shall include provision 
for agreed action by the United States 
of America and the United Kingdom, 
open to participation by all other 
countries of like mind, directed to the 
expansion, by appropriate interna- 
tional and domestic measures, of pro- 
duction, employment, and the ex- 
change and consumption of goods, 
which are the material foundations of 
the liberty and welfare of all peoples ; 
to the elimination of all forms of 
discriminatory treatment in interna- 
tional commerce, and to the reduction 
of tariffs and other trade barriers; 
and, in general, to the attainment of 
all the economic objectives set forth 
in the Joint Declaration made on 
August 12, 1941, by the President of 
the United States of America and the 
Prime Minister of the United King- 
dom. 

" 'At an early convenient date, con- 
versations shall be begun between the 
two Governments with a view to de- 
termining, in the light of governing 
economic conditions, the best means 
of attaining the above-stated objec- 
tives by their own agreed action and 
of seeking the agreed action of other 
like-minded Governments.' 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Thursday, August 31, 1944 



FOREIGN TRADE TIPS 



The Chamber of Commerce cannot 
undertake to guarantee the financial 
standing and responsibility of any firm 
or individual mentioned in TRADE 
TIPS, and it is suggested that the 
usual investigation be made in each 
instance. For further details regarding 
an item call the World Trade Depart- 
ment of the San Francisco Chamber 
of Commerce, EXbrook4511 and refer 
to inquiry by the Trade Tip's number. 

3410 TRADE WITH ENGLAND 

Hide. Fur and Skin Brokers Ltd., Brook's Wharf 
48. Upper Thames Street, London E.C.4. England. 
desire connection with San Francisco exporters 
of hides, furs, and skins. They also want contact 
with importers of dressed and dyed furskins and 
fur garments. 

3411 REPRESENTATION IN ARGENTINA 

Cientifica Industrial. Avenida de Mayo 1400, 
Buenos Aires. Argentina, is anxious to represent 
in Argentina, firms that manufacture laboratory 
supplies, scientific instruments, drugs, reactive 
chemical products, etc. 

3412 BUSINESS WITH MEXICO 

F. Sanchez A., 20 de Noviembre 42. despacho 407, 
Mexico D.F.. Mexico, wants to be put in touch 



3413 REPRESENTATION IN MEXICO 

Business man. familiar with markets in Moxicn, 
seeks connections with manul'aruirr-r- ->i varn.us 
lines of merchandise suitable for sale in Mexico. 



Address communications to Mr. C. H. Lindner, 
c/o World Trade Department, San Francisco 
Chamber of Commerce. 333 Pine Street. San 
Francisco 4. California. 



3414 MEXICAN TRADE 

Fomento Mercantil S.A., 1 lolores 16, despacho 
501, Mexico D.F., Mexico, is interested in con- 
tacting American manufacturer* and .■\p->nrr-, 
who might be desirous of trading with Mexico. 
Thiscomi any is especially interested in industrial 
supplies and materials. 

3415 BRAZILIAN BUSINESS 

Lino T. Ravaglio. 210 rua Riachuelo < llritibia, 
Parana. Brazil, is willing to rt-present Aukti. an 
Brms m the State of Parana. Brazil. 

3416 BOTTLING EQUIPMENT FOR CARBON- 
ATED BEVERAGES 

R. B. Searcy e hijos, Avenida "B" numero f>f>2. 
Tijuana, Baia California. Mexico, are extremely 
interested in purchasing used bottling equipment 
for carbonated beverages. 

3417 COMMODITIES FROM ARGENTINA 

Frascara y Cia., Conientes 3&M. Buenos Aires, 
Argentina, want to export handbags, belts, furs, 
champagne, gin. whisky, honey, cheese, etc. 

3418 REPRESENTATION IN GUADALAJARA 

Arturo Valdovinos C. Lopez Cotilla 255. Guada- 
lajara. Jalisco. Mexico, wants to become a repre- 
agent. acting 



3419 SULPHUR IN POWDER 

Herman"- Tupino Aguem S.A . Avi-imJ.i \u 
tina, 1802. Lima. Peru, seek contact with Vi 
! of powdered sulphur. 



SPECIAL NOTICE: The Brazilian Government 
Trade Bureau. 551 Fifth Avenue, New York 17, X.V.. 
has supplied the World Trade Department with the 
last Brazilian Bulletin in Portuguese language, which 
contains trade opportunities and other valuable trade 
information. Those interested may see the bulletin by 
calling at the World Trade Department Office. 



Published weekly at 333 Pine St., San Francisco, 
Zone 4, County of San Francisco, California. Will 
Williams, Editor. Telephone EXbrook 4511. Sub- 
scription, Fifty Cents a Year (Included in Annual 
Dues). Entered as Second Class matter April 26, 
1944, at the Post Office at San Francisco, Cali- 
fornia, under the act of March 3, 1870. 



31st National Foreign 
Trade Convention Set 
For October 9, 10 and 11 

The 31st National Foreign Trade 
Convention will lie held Monday, 
Tuesday, and Wednesday — October 
9, 10, and 11 in the Hotel Pennsyl- 
vania, New York, according to an 
announcement by Eugene P. Thomas, 
president, National ForeignTrade 
Council, Inc., who will also be con- 
vention chairman. 

• Subjects to be considered will 
include: future of Lend-Lease opera- 
tions; government controls in the for- 
eign commercial field ; disposition of 
government-owned surpluses ; postwar 
transportation ; monetary policy and 
exchange stabilization ; future of re- 
ciprocal trade agreements program ; 
foreign investments; international 
business agreements; commercial and 
tax treaties, and many others. 

• Thomas urged prompt registra- 
tion of all delegates, due to wartime 
conditions. 

• For registration or further in- 
formation, call or write Mr. William 
L. Montgomery, San Francisco Cham- 
ber of Commerce, EXbrook 451 1 , 3i3 
Pine Street. 

Transportation conditions do 
not encourage Convention Travel; 
yet San Francisco businessmen 
whose affairs require them to be 
East during early October are re- 
quested to participate in the Con- 
vention's proceedings. 

The San Francisco Chamber of Commerce 

333 Plna Street, San FranciMO 4 
EXbrook 4511 



BOARD MEMBER AT 
SUPERVISORS' MEETING 

The member of the San Fran- 
cisco Chamber Board of Direc- 
tors who attended the Board of 
Supervisors meeting, Monday, 
August 28 was: 

Frank Edwards. 



Chamber Congratulated on 
Efforts Against Hotel Seizure 

Typical of the letters of congratu- 
lation received by the San Francisco 
Chamber of Commerce on its stand 
regarding the proposed taking over of 
several hotels by the Army recently 
is a letter received from Walter G. 
Swanson, vice-president and general 
manager of the San Francisco Tourist 
and Convention Bureau. 

The letter, addressed to Louis 
Lundborg, manager of the Cham- 
ber, said in part "Congratulations 
to your president Adrien Falk, 
yourself and Ralph Koeber on the 
fine presentation made against 
the taking over of the San Fran- 
cisco hotels by the Army. I am 
sure that everyone who knows 
anything about it will be very 
grateful to you indeed." 





V W PUBLISHED BY THE 

SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 



Volume I 



Thursday, September 7, 1944 



Number 23 



Business Activity Edition 



Thumb Nail Sketch 

The Research Department 

San Francisco Chamber 

of Commerce 

• The Regional Labor Force Sur- 
rey preliminary tabulations of five 
Bay Area shipyards having a total of 
56,860 employees, reveal 58 per cent 
in-migrants. 

More than two-thirds of the 
in-migrants desire to remain in 
California; a little over one-half 
would like to remain in a similar 
type of activity; one-fifth plan to 
leave California when their war 
job is ended ; one-tenth want to go 
back to farming as owners or 
workers; about one out of twenty 
is planning to go into business for 
himself; and one out of twelve is 
indefinite as to his future plans. 

• Manufacturing industries in the 
San Francisco Industrial Area reports 
for July reveal 252,000 wage earners 
compared to 248,000 in June and 280,- 
600 last July. The durable group em- 
ploying 192,000 workers reported 
4,700 fewer in July than in June and 
36,200 less than July last year, but the 
non-durable group with 60,000 
workers reported an increase of 8,600 
over June and 7,600 over July last 
year. 

July payrolls in the manufac- 
turing industry were off 7.7 per 
cent compared to last July, but 
the average for the 7 months was 
up 2 per cent above the similar 
period last year. Payrolls in the 
non-manufacturing industries for 
both July and the 7 months were 
above the corresponding periods 
last year. Average weekly earnings 
in July amounted to $58.74 com- 
pared to $60.53 in June and $57.18 
during last July. Average hourly 
earnings amounted to $1,329 com- 



pared to $1,338 in June and $1,291 
last July. The average hours 
worked per week amounted to 44.2 
compared to 45.2 in June and 44.3 
last July. 

• Bay Region retail department 
store sales in July were up 9 per cent 
with the cumulative for the 7 months 
up 7 per cent. Twelfth District sales 
were up 8 per cent and 7 per cent 
respectively. July sales in San Fran- 
cisco compared to July a year ago 
were up 10 per cent; Oakland, 6 per 
cent; San Jose, 5 per cent; Vallejo- 
Napa, 9 per cent; Santa Rosa, 20 per 
cent; Fresno, 18 percent ; Stockton, 13 
per cent ; Sacramento, 7 per cent ; with 
the Central Valley figure up 12 per 
cent. 

• July financial transactions in the 
San Francisco Bay Area measured by 
bank debits were 1 1 per cent under 
June but 6.6 per cent above last July. 
The cumulative for the 7 months 
amounting to S14, 61 1,724,000 was up 
14.8 per cent. July freight movements 
within the San Francisco-Oakland 
switching limits were 9.8 per cent 
above last July and just under the 
highest month on record. The 7 
months' cumulative was up 9.2 per 
cent. 



SAN FRANCISCO 

BUSINESS ACTIVITY 

UNADJUSTED INDEX 1935- 




11 A S O N D 



• General business activity in San 
Francisco during July as measured by 
our index turned down abruptly from 
the abnormal June peak to a more nor- 
mal seasonal trend line. The July 
index at 178.0 was 9.8 per cent above 
July last year and carried the 7 
months' average to 179.7, or 13.2 per 
cent above the same period last year. 

• Pronounced gains. Major activi- 
ties in San Francisco showing pro- 
nounced gains in July compared to 
last July and also for the 7 months 
cumulative include: Real estate sales 
up 103.4 per cent and 79.2 per cent; 
postal receipts, 66.0 per cent and 123.4 
per cent ; market value of San Fran- 
cisco Stock Exchange transactions, 
10.1 per cent and 19 per cent; indus- 
trial placements, 57.4 per cent and 
25.3 per cent; San Francisco Airport 
plane traffic. 46.4 per cent and 28.0 
percent, and passenger traffic 71.5 per 
cent and 31.5 per cent; air mail 
loaded. 124.2 per cent and 117.3 per 
cent; electrical energy sales. 17.0 per 
cent and 16.8 per cent; hotel industrial 
payrolls. 14.4 per cent and 21.3 per 
cent ; and department store retail 
sales. 14.6 per cent and 7.3 per cent. 

There were no commercial fail- 
ures reported during July and the 
7 months' cumulative liabilities 
were less than one-half of those a 
year ago. In contrast to these im- 
provements, the value of building 
permits issued during July was 47 
per cent under last July, but the 
cumulative was down only 5.8 per 
cent; tourist and settler inquiries 
received by the Chamber were 
down 45.2 per cent and 43.8 per 
cent. 

• The July living cost index in San 
Francisco at 129.3 was practically the 
same as in June, but 3.2 per cent above 
July last year. House furnishing 

(Continued on page 4) 



Luncheon Announcement Inside See Page 3 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Thursday, September 7, 1944 



Sacramento C of C Officials 
To be Guests of S. F. Chamber 



Luncheon Celebrating 
Brazil's Independence 
To be Held Today 

In observance of Brazil's Indepen- 
dence Day, the Foreign Trade Asso- 
ciation of the San Francisco Chamber 
is holding a luncheon today at the 
Fairmont Hotel. 

• Hon. A. de Saboia Lima, Consul 
General of Brazil in San Francisco, 
will be guest speaker for the day. 

He will speak on "Brazil and 
the United States — Partners in 
Destiny." 

Consul General A. Saboia Lima's 
career in the service of Brazil extends 
over a period of 29 years and includes 
representation of his country in Lima, 
Cairo, Vienna, Berlin, Chicago and 
San Francisco (since August 1940). 

Chamber members desirous of 
attending this luncheon may 
'phone for reservations — EXbrook 
4511, Local 31. 



Walker to Speak at 
Junior C of C Lunch 

Frank C. Walker, Postmaster Gen- 
eral of the United States, will be guest 
speaker at a major luncheon in the 
Palm Court, Palace Hotel, in observ- 
ance of Aviation Day on September 8. 

The luncheon, sponsored by the 
San Francisco Junior Chamber of 
Commerce, will celebrate the be- 
ginning of the 25th year of trans- 
continental airmail service into 
San Francisco. 

• Walker will speak on "World- 
wide Future for Air Cargo." 



Sheet Metal Plant Sought 

With a view to converting postwar 
production to a new line of metal 
products, a manufacturer would be 
interested in acquiring a sheet metal 
plant in the Bay Region. If you are 
interested in selling such a plant or 
know of anyone who is so inclined, 
please communicate with the Cham- 
ber's Industrial Department — EX- 
brook 4511. 



The President and Board of Direc- 
tors of the Sacramento Chamber of 
Commerce will be guests of the San 
Francisco Chamber's Board and Do- 
mestic Trade Committee, Wednesday, 
September 13, Arthur Towne, chair- 
man, Domestic Trade Committee an- 
nounced today. 

Carrying forward the San Fran- 
cisco Chamber's "Good Neigh- 
bor" policy, guests from Sacra- 
mento will get together with their 
San Francisco hosts at luncheon 
in the Bohemian Club where they 
will be officially welcomed by 
Mayor Lapham and Chamber 
President Adrien J. Falk, after 
which there will be a brief busi- 
ness meeting. 

• Highlight of the day will be a 
tour of the United States Naval Dry- 
docks at Hunters Point, arranged 
through the courtesy of Captain N. L. 
Rawlings, Officer in Charge. 

"We are looking forward to 
meeting again with Sacramento 
Chamber officials and reciprocat- 
ing the interesting and enjoyable 
visit Domestic Trade Committee 
members had as guests in Sacra- 
mento last year," Towne com- 
mented. 

Surplus Goods Available 

The Procurement Division of the 
Treasury Department, 30 Van Ness 
Avenue, HEmlock 1922, advises that 
the following goods have been de- 
clared surplus and available to eligible 
purchasers: 

1. Five gallon containers made of 
20 gauge steel and having pouring 
spouts will be sold in carload lots f .o.b. 
warehouse nearest to buyer, the West- 
ern warehouses being located at Mid- 
vale, Utah and Mira Loma, California. 

2. 34 complete incinerator plants 
with 2000 lbs. per hour capacity. De- 
tailed specifications are available from 
F. S. Albrecht, Regional Director, 
Treasury Procurement, 50 Church 
Street, New York City 7. 

3. 800,000 lbs. of talc, packaged in 
4H lb. units. 98% of the material 
will pass through a 325 mesh screen. 

Western Air Opens New Office 

New Western Air Lines traffic of- 
fices were officially opened Friday, 
September 1, at 287 Geary Street, 
with the unveiling of a 6 x 16 foot 
mural painted by Waano Gano, na- 
tionally famous Cherokee Indian 
artist. 



Company Plans For 
Increased Cork Output 

Recent acquisition of a S3 acre site! 
in San Francisco by the Western] 
Crown Cork and Seal Corporation for 
the construction of a postwar plant j 
has given added interest to Cali- 
fornia's latest industry — the raising 
of cork oaks for cork production, ac-| 
cording to G. L. Fox, manager, Indus- 
trial Department, San Francisco] 
Chamber. 

• Native to the Mediterranean areas, 
the growth of cork oaks was first] 
advocated in the United States byj 
Thomas Jefferson. Though the first 
cork oaks were planted in California 
in 1855 the first serious steps to de-] 
velop the industry were taken in 1940 
when Western Crown Cork and Seal 
started the distribution of cork oak] 
trees throughout the state as a war J 
time necessity with a view to makingj 
California independent of other mar-| 
kets for its cork products. 

Tests made from bark stripped 
from the few trees that are ma-: 
ture reveal that quality of thei 
California product is equal to that 
of the European bark of the same 
grade. 

• While nearly 200,000 trees have 
so far been set out in the state since] 
the beginning of the company's pro-] 
gram, it is planned to have an ulti- 
mate total of more than seven million 
trees. 

Though no large production volume 
of native cork is expected for another 
ten years Western Crown is planning 
to increase grinding facilities as rap-j 
idly as the rising cork harvests war-) 
rant. 

One great value of the cork oaks 
is that they provide a valuable 
means to farmers for utilizing; 
land which otherwise would bring: 
in only a small income. 



Army Abandons Plan 
To Take Over Hotels 

The following is a wire received 
by Adrien J. Falk, president, San 
Francisco Chamber of Commerce 
from Frank E. Marsh, manager, 
Chamber's Washington Office: 

"Hotel people can be assured 
proposed plan of Army to take 
over 2500 rooms San Francisco 
has been abandoned." 

This information was fur- 
nished to Marsh by the office of 
Undersecretary of War Patter- 



Thursday, September 7, 1944 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Foreign Trade Policies 



A Report from the Postwar Planning Committee for Foreign 

Trade, a Sub-committee of the Foreign Trade Committee 

of the San Francisco Chamber of Commerce. 



New China-United States Treaty 

In cooperation with the China-America Council of 
Commerce and Industry. Inc. with Pacific Coast head- 
quarters in the Mills Building, San Francisco, the San 
Francisco Chamber of Commerce has appointed a Com- 
mittee to develop suggestions for inclusion in a new 
China-United States Treaty, to follow the recent relin- 
quishment by the United States of extraterritoriality in 
China: 

E. Russell Lutz. Executive Vice President, American 
President Lines, Chairman. 

( >-< ar G. Steen, Vice President in charge of Far Eastern 
Affairs, American President Lines, Vice Chairman. 

Major Arthur Bassett, China Director, British-American 
Tobacco Co. 

John E. Black. Manager, Foreign Trade Department, 
Standard Oil Company of California 

Percy C. Denroche, President, S. L. Jones & Co. 

Gustav A. Gumbrecht. Managing Partner, H. W. Pea- 
body Co. 

Ira S. Lillick, Admiralty Attorney. 

R. A. .May, President, Getz Bros. & Co. 

Wm. L. Montgomery. Manager, World Trade Depart- 
ment, San Francisco Chamber of Commerce. Secretary. 

Julean Arnold, Pacific Coast Representative, 
China-America Council of Commerce & Industry, Inc. 
is serving with the San Francisco Chamber's Committee 
in liaison with the Council's headquarters in New York 
City. Arnold was for thirty-eight years American 
Commercial Attache and Consular Officer in China. 

Appointment of this working Committee on the China- 
United States Treaty follows approval by the San Fran- 
cisco Chamber's Board of Directors of the following 
recommendation advanced by the Chamber's Postwar 
Planning Committee for Foreign Trade : 



"UNITED STATES-CHINA RELATIONS 

"With the relinquishment of extraterritoriality by the 
United States our commercial and other relations with 
China are now governed by the general provisions of 
international law. 

"Our interests would be well served were a new treaty 
with China to be in effect at an early date and prior to 
the resumption of normal trade relations anticipated for 
the postwar period. The new treaty should provide, 
among other features, adequate protection of United 
States rights in China covering port, property, and trad- 
ing rights; trade-marks, copyrights, and patents; and 
non-discriminatorv taxation." 



Lend-Lease Program 



Discussion of the question of lend-lease con- 
tinuance after the European phase of the war is 
concluded suggests that the San Francisco Cham- 
ber of Commerce should publish a statement as to 
its basic attitude towards lend-lease: 

"We endorse the Lend-Lease program as a necessary 
war measure if restricted to the procurement of essential 
war material. We believe, however, that it is to the 
interest of all the citizens of the United States that 
Lend-Lease operations be concluded as soon as possible 
and that foreign trade be returned to the customary pre- 
war trade channels. 

"We recommend that there should be returned now 
to private channels of export trade all commodities not 
classified as essential war material so that in the interest 
of American foreign trade now and after the war the 
customary pre-war private channels of commerce will be 
maintained and the identity of American brands and 
trademarks be preserved." 

This declaration has been enunciated as San Francisco 
Chamber of Commerce policy, following study and rec- 
ommendation made by the Postwar Planning Committee 
for Foreign Trade, a sub-committee of the Chambers 
Foreign Trade Committee, and approved by the Board 
of Directors. 



4i See Page 3 for Luncheon Announcement 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Thursday, September 7, 1944 



SURVEY OF BUSINESS CONDITIONS 
IN SAN FRANCISCO 



BRANCH OF ACTIVITY 



GENERAL BUSINESS ACTIVITY 
S. F. C. of C. Index 1935-39 Avg. = 100 

CONSTRUCTION PERMITS 

Total. (number) 

(value) 
Residential. New (number) 

(value' 
Single-family Dwellings. New (number 

(value 
Non-residential, New (number 

(value 
Additions. Alterations & Repairs (number 

(value 
Installations (number 

(value 
REAL ESTATE 
Sales (number) 

(vT 

Mortgages & Deeds of Trust. (number) 

(amount) 
Releases (number) 

RETAIL DEPARTMENT STORE SALES 

San Francisco (index) 

FINANCE 

Bank Debits (S000) 

Bank Clearings ($000) 

Postal Receipts (S) 

San Francisco Stock Exchange (no. shares traded) 

(market value) 

COMMERCIAL FAILURES (number) 

Liabilities (S 

Assets (S 

EMPLOYMENT & PAYROLLS— Bay Area (5 Co.'s) (a) 

Employment (manufacturing) (index) 

Payrolls (manufacturing) (index) 

NON-MFG. INDUSTRIES (5 Co. 'a) (a) (index) 

Laundering. Cleaning, Dyeing (payroll 

Wholesale Trade (payroll 

Retail Trade (payroll) 

Hotels (payroll) 

PLACEMENTS IN SAN FRANCISCO— U. S. E. S. 

Industrial Placements (number) 

Commercial Placements (number) 

TRANSPORTATION 

Carloads (number) 

San Francisco Airport Traffic (no. planes 

(no. passengers 

Express Shipments — Rail (number) 

Air (number) 

Air Mail Loaded (pounds) 

UTILITIES & NEW DEVELOPMENTS 

Electric Energy Sales Index .(k.w.hrs.) 

Industrial & Commercial Gas Sales (cu. ft.) 

Water Consumers (net gain) 

Tourist & Settler Inquiries (number) 

DAIRY RECEIPTS, FRUITS & VEGETABLES 

Butter (pounds) 

Cheese. - (pounds) 

Eggs. (cases) 

Poultry. Dressed (pounds) 

Fruits & Vegetables (carlots) 

LIVESTOCK SLAUGHTER (b) (total number) 

Cattle (number) 

Calves (number) 

Sheep & Lambs (number) 

Hogs (number) 

S. F. LIVING COSTS 1935-39 Avg. = 100 

Food (index) 

Clothing (index) 

Rent (index) 

Fuel and Light (index) 

House Furnishing Goods (index) 

Miscellaneous (index) 

All Items (index) 



9.736,432 

1,176 

10.463.199 



1.585,729 
1.216.414 
2.767.309 



162.1 
144.5 
129.5 
180.8 

14.255 
13.150 
1,105 



25,952 

282.562 

7,730 

832.713 



7.457.020 

1.723.654 

173.975 

2.436.711 

2.362 

217.195 
35.269 
17,067 

114,172 



142.4 
136.8 
106.3 
92.6 
137.4 
129.6 
129.3 



5.287.423 

1,136 

6.167.545 



1,488.933 
1. 146,385 
1.666,757 
499.901 
8.027,709 



135.0 
128.3 
158.0 

9.418 
8,353 
1.065 



28.311 

1.230 

15.130 

253,177 



6.030,583 

4,094,734 

103,706 

621.028 

2.093 



5.803 
123.705 
50.945 



140.0 
127.3 
106.0 
92.1 
118.7 
124.3 
125.3 



-24.2 
-47.0 
-79.6 
-78.3 
-79.6 
-78.3 
85.7 
55.2 



-57.9 
67.8 

292.3 
12.9 



22.1 
194.1 
-7.7 
-0.5 



.U'J.s.so 

1.073 

>. 135.996 



7,324 

54,599.391 

8,263 



11,238,125 
8,338,723 

19,852,425 
3,631,308 

57,443 095 



79.413 
71.390 
8,023 



214,534 
10.524 
129.076 
1.996.817 
53.498 
4,791.954 



29.018.201 
8.326,304 
1.147,153 

16,101,192 
13.291 

1,469,503 
230,783 
80,647 
674.002 
483.071 



142.7 
135.0 
106.2 
92.6 
125.6 
127.5 
128.3 



9,535 

5,233 
40.609,632 

5,750 
35.511.315 

7.067 
43.537.963 

150 



9.716.100 
7.322.380 
8.885.111 
3,514.217 

48,291.532 



16 



150.3 
129.5 
127.5 



66.559 
56.965 
9.S94 



197.061 

8,222 

98.165 

1.774.035 

48.563 

2,205,298 



6.568.064,600 



35.332,747 

15,172,134 

298,108 

8.835,963 

12,827 

1,298,281 
168.158 
29.690 
764.354 
336.082 



144.9 
127.2 
106.0 
92.4 



(a) These data are based on reports submitted to the Dn 



( of Labor Statistics and Law Enfo 



State of Califo 



(b) Federal Inspection — San Francisco District. 

Acknowledgment is hereby made to Thomas Magee & Sons, Dun & Bradstreet, Inc., local utilities, private organizations, Federal 
Reserve Bank of San Francisco. California State Departments of Industrial Relations. Agriculture, and Employment, and the United 
States Departments of Labor, Agriculture, and Commerce, and the United States Bureau of the Census, for the basic data each con- 
tributed toward this survey compiled by the Research Department, San Francisco Chamber of Commerce. 



Thursday, September 7, 1944 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



"Hawaii's Place in Pacific Policy" 



U 



A Message From The Islands In The Pacific 

to be delivered by 

n 



G 




n 



DELEGATE, Territory of Hawaii to U. S. Congress 
PUBLISHER, Honolulu Star-Bulletin 



At Luncheon in the Commercial Club 



THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 1944 



SPONSORED BY 



San Francisco Chamber of Commerce 
San Francisco Commercial Club 



* It is especially URGENT that you 
make reservations immediately for 
this luncheon because of the un- 
avoidable shortness of notice. 



SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 
333 Pine Street, San Francisco, California 

Please reserve. place(s) for me at $1.50 each at 

uncheon honoring Hon. Joseph R. Farrington on Thursday, 
September 14, in the San Francisco Commercial Club, at 12 noon. 
^Kindly enclose self-addressed envelope for forwarding tickets.) 



Check 
Enclosed 



Name.... 

Firm. 

Address 



At Luncheon in 

The San Franciscc 
Commercial Club 

Thursday noon, September 14, 194 1 

Price $1.50 per plate 

{ $1.46 plus 4c tax} 



R.S.V.P. Members will be taken care of t< 
the limit of capacity and as received, but i 
will be to your advantage to make reserva 
c ions early before ticket sales are opened t< 
the general public. 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Thursday, September 7, 1944 



FOREIGN TRADE TIPS 



The Chamber of Commerce cannot under- 
take to guarantee the financial standing and 
responsibility of any firm or individual men- 
tioned in TRADE TIPS, and it is suggested 
that the usual investigation be made in each 
instance. For further details regarding an 
item call the World Trade Department of the 
San Francisco Chamber of Commerce, EX- 
brook 4511, and refer to inquiry by the Trade 
Tip's number. 

3420 MEDICAL AND PHARMACEUTICAL 
PRODUCTS 

Fernando Ferrari Inc.. Avenida Paz Barahona. 
Numero 70, Tegucigalpa, D.C.. Honduras, Cen- 
tral America, is anxious to contact laboratories 
preparing medical and pharmaceutical products, 
vaccines, serums and general biological products. 

3421 COMMODITIES TO ITALY 

Giuseppe Giobbe S.A.. San Pasquale a Chiaia 83, 
Naples, Italy, wants to be put in touch with San 
Francisco firms who desire to do business in Italy 
and the Mediterranean basin, especially as ex- 
porters of cereals, cottons, stuffs, machines, fats, 
etc. Bank references supplied. 

3422 NATURAL SILK STOCKINGS 

G. Chadrycki. Run Uruguayana 86-10, Sala 1010. 
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, is interested in exporting 
Brazilian products in general, principally women's 
natural silk stockings. He is seeking representa- 
tives in the United States of America for his 
products. 

3423 CARVED MEXICAN SADDLES 

Fifty hand-carved Mexican saddles manufac- 
tured in Mexico, especially for the American 
trade, are ready for prompt shipment in Nogales. 
Arizona, where the stock is now available. Those 
interested in this article may get in contact di- 
rectly with: Comestibles S.A.. Apartado 22, 
Nogales, Sonora, Mexico. 

3224 REPRESENTATION IN PALESTINE 

R. J. Somekh. P.O. Box 1309 Jaffa Road. Km. 1. 
Tel-Aviv, Palestine, desires connections with 
San Francisco exporters of timber, plywood, 
paper, wheat, flour, canned fruits, fish, etc., for 
their representation in Palestine. 

3425 ENGINEERING SERVICES 

Cardenas. Martinez y Cia.. Ltda.. Edificio Crane 
306. Apartado 222, Bogota. Colombia, offer their 
services to represent American manufacturers of 
engineering and construction products. This com- 
pany is composed of four engineers, who have 
made special studies in the United States of 
America. 



Uniform Termination Financing 

The first uniform procedure pre- 
scribed by the Office of Contract Set- 
tlement was contained in that agency's 
Regulation No. 1, which is entitled 
"Procedure for Guaranteeing Ter- 
mination Loans by War and Navy 
Departments and Maritime Commis- 
sion." 

• Members interested in the con- 
tents of the regulation will find it in 
the Federal Register for August 25. 
A copy of that issue is available at 
the Chamber's Domestic Trade De- 
partment for perusal. 



FOREIGN TRADE TIPS-c*«<w 

3432 PRODUCTS FROM EL SALVADOR 

Mario Oliva Olivares. Segunda Avenida Sur 
numero 125, San Salvador. El Salvador, Central 
America, desires connections with San Francisco 
importers who might be interested in importing 
various types of products maruil'attured by small 
industries in El Salvador. 

3433 REPRESENTATION IN HONDURAS 

Agencias Pan-Americanas. Apartado 109, Tegu- 
cigalpa D.C.. Honduras. Central America, want 

to contact American manufacturers and exporters 
of a great variety of products for t heir representa- 



List 



,.], ,)>!,- . 



tin- World 



3434 BUSINESS WITH PERU 

Pedro J. Farfan e hijo. Conception 533. Casilla 
1573. Lima, Peru, are anxious to represent San 
Francisco manufacturers and exporters on a com- 
mission basis. Bank references supplied. 

3435 TRADE WITH EL SALVADOR 

Jose G. Larin. San Salvador, El Salvador. Central 
America, is interested in representing San Fran- 
cisco manufacturers and exporters of canned 
goods, dry-goods and hats. 

3436 PRODUCTS TO COLOMBIA 

Luis Cuellar Calderon. Edificio Central, Calle 
13, Numero 9-13. Oficina 308. Bogota. Colombia, 
desires to represent manufacturers and exporters 



3437 MEXICAN HANDICRAFTS 

Desiring direct connections with wholesalers, de- 
partment stores, gift shops, etc., La Malinche 
S. de R.L., Tehuantepec 237. Mexico D.F., 
Mexico, is ready to make shipment of thes 
articles in any quantil* 



this line trade. 



those interest'*'! in 



DOMESTIC TRADETIPS 



A digest of correspondence received from 
those desiring, or offering, lines of merchan- 
dise for representation. They are listed here 
as a service without necessarily bearing en- 
dorsement by the Chamber. For further de- 
tails, contact the Domestic Trade Depart- 
ment, EXbrook 45 1 1 , Ext. 56. 

D-6045— M. JOHNS, SOUTHWEST 
SALES SERVICE, P.O. Box 8073, Houston, 
4, Texas, offer their services to manufacturers 
who wish to establish products in the Texas 
market. 

D-6046— J A. SNOW, MONARCH GOV- 
ERNOR COMPANY, 1832 West Bethune 
Avenue, Detroit, 6, Michigan, is interested 
in contacting local agent to handle new collet 
chuck, adaptable to milling, grinding, drilling 
and reaming. 

D-6047— MILT WINICK AND SAM 
EISENSTARK, 900 Avenue H, Brooklyn, 
New York, interested in representing women's 
and children's clothing manufacturers. 

D-6048— GARLAND B. WERLE, 1309 
Grant Street, Denver, 3, Colorado, wishes to 
represent in his territory, local food manu- 
facturers. 

Business Activity 

(Continued from page 1) 
goods, however, compared to last July 
were up 15.8 per cent, clothing 7.5 per 
cent, and food 1.7 per cent. The 7 
months' average at 128.3 was 1.4 per 
cent above the same period last year, 
while clothing, house furnishings, and 
miscellaneous items showed gains of 
6.1 per cent, 5.5 per cent, and 4.4 per 
cent respectively. Food costs were 1.5 
per cent under the same period last 
year. Rent, fuel, and light remained 
practically identical. 



Published weekly at 333 Pine St., San Francisco, 
Zone 4, County oi San Francisco, California. Will 
Williams, Editor. Telephone EXbrook 4511. Sub- 
scription, Fifty Cents a Year (Included in Annual 
Dues). Entered as Second Class matter April 26, 
1944, at the Post Office at San Francisco, Cali- 
fornia, under the act of March 3, 1870. 



91-60. Rio de Janeiro. Brazil, is at the disposal of 
those interested in trading with Brazil. Their 
services include any information regarding the 
sale of American equipment in that country, the 
promotion of industries in Brazil or the purchase 
of Brazilian products. 
3428 BRITISH INDIA AND BURMA BUSINESS 
Sydney Scott Bah-Oh. 546 Arlington Avenue. 
Berkeley. California. LA5-3978. with British 
India and Burma connections, is available lor 
interviews with manufacturers and exporters in- 
terested in postwar distribution of their products 



The San Francisco Chamber of Commerce 

333 Pina Street, San Francisco 4 
EXbrook 4511 



Sec. 562 P. L. & R. 

U. S. POSTAGE 



3429 REPRESENTATION IN PUERTO RICO 

Floer & Baldassari. Calle Co 
(Altos) San Juan 4. Puerto Rk 



3430 GARMENTS FROM COOK ISLANDS 

D. C. Brown, P.O. Box 16, Rarotonga. Cook 
Islands, exporter of various articles manufac- 
tured in Cook Islands, seeks connections with 
American importers of hula skirts, Pikake shell 
necklaces and mixed shells. Prices and samples 
are available at the World Trade Department. 

3431 EXPORTATION TO ECUADOR 

Carlos E. Roggiero E-. Pedro Moncayo 1211 y 
Ballen (Altos). Guayaquil, Ecuador, is interested 
in connecting with it firm able to offer wheat flour, 
pork lard, edible oils, sardines, glassware, rebuilt 




W PUfilKHFH IIV TUE 



W PUBLISHED BY 1 

SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 



Volume I 



Thursday, September 14, 1944 



Number 24 



WASHINGTON NOTES 



• Acting Chairman J. A. Krug, of 

the War Production Board, has an- 
nounced that the Army, Navy, and 
major war agencies have unanimously 
igreed on a program designed to pro- 
vide the utmost stimulus to recon- 
version when Germany is defeated, 
Arhile at the same time protecting pro- 
duction necessary for the Japanese 
,var. 

Acting upon findings that there will 
lie a reduction of about 40% of war 
production within three months after 
:he defeat of Germanv, which will free 
)ver 4,000,000 workers, the Board 
lecided to: 

1. Remove almost all controls over 
naterials immediately upon the de- 
eat of Germany except those that are 
absolutely necessary to assure the re- 
luced measure of war production 
lecessary to beat Japan. This means 
:hat all manufacturers can use 
iny plant and any materials that 
ire not needed for military pro- 
luction, for any civilian produc- 
:ion. 

2. The War Production Board and 
>ther Government agencies will do 
everything within their powers to 
issist and encourage industry in re- 
iuming civilian production and main- 
lining employment through the 
'know-how" of its industry divisions 
ind industry and labor advisory 
:ommittees. 

3. The Board will maintain its or- 
ganization and powers so as not to 
elinquish authority until it is certain 
hat the war production program is 
ideq uate for victory over J apan. 

I Price Administrator Chester 
Jowles has asked Congress to remove 
ts ban on use of "Government stand- 
irds" or so-called "A.M. A. grades" in 
>ricing canned fruits and vegetables 
>ecause that ban "makes impossible 
>roper enforcement of price ceilings on 
:anned fruits and vegetables and 
nakes the American consumer the 
'ictim of widespread price increases." 

? rom the Chamber's Washington Office. 



Public Relations Group 
Establishes Bay Area 
Chapter; Falk Praises 

Formation of a San Francisco Bay 
Area Chapter of the American Council 
on Public Relations is applauded by 
Adrien J. Falk, president of the San 
Francisco Chamber of Commerce. 

"Through their association, 
workers in the public relations 
field will raise their professional 
standards and contribute to a bet- 
ter understanding among various 
groups of the community," Falk 
said. "Formation of the Chapter 
is a fine thing for the San Fran- 
cisco Bay Area, which is now way 
out in front in the significant field 
of public relations." 

• Formation of the Chapter, with 
Ray B. Wiser, president, California 
Farm Bureau Federation, as presi- 
dent, has just been announced. 

First public meeting of the Chapter 
was held Tuesday, September 12. 

"Bay Area Leadership in Public 
Relations" was the subject of the 
main address given by Wiser. 

• The Chapter was given official 
status upon presentation to Wiser of a 
charter from the American Council on 
Public Relations, which has its na- 
tional headquarters in San Francisco. 
The charter was presented by Dr. Rex 
F. Harlow, president, American Coun- 
cil on Public Relations. 



Celebrate Wars End in 
Europe by Greater Efforts 
for Final V-Day!- Falk 

"( )n to Tokio!" That should be the 
thought uppermost in the hearts and 
minds of us all when the hour of 
Europe's liberation and Hitler's down- 
fall comes, according to Chairman Ted 
Huggins of the "V-Day" Committee 
of the San Francisco Chamber. 

Adrien J. Falk, president of the San 
Francisco Chamber of Commerce, 
declared : 

"Throughout the United States 
business executives and civic 
leaders are anticipating the day 
when the collapse of the war in 
Europe will be officially an- 
nounced. There will be great re- 
joicing, and rightly so. But there 
are grave and practical reasons for 
planning in advance to control 
public demonstrations. 

"The lives of millions of fighting 
men are still at stake. There must be 
no relaxation that will retard the war 
effort in any way." 

Commenting further, Falk said : 
"For San Franciscans who have 
been so near the Japanese war 
front the day of Germany's defeat 
will be an hour of solemn rededi- 
cation of this country's strength 
for the purpose of bringing the 
Mikado's empire to unconditional 
surrender." 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS NOTES 



Thursday, September 7, 1944, the 
Board of Directors of the San Fran- 
cisco Chamber of Commerce met at 
the San Francisco Commercial Club. 
The following business was transacted : 

1. A special committee was ap- 
pointed to consider Referendum No. 
84 Chamber of Commerce of the 
U. S. — Social Security Policies. 

2. A resolution of the Victory Day 
Committee calling for re-dedication 
and redoubled efforts to complete the 
victory in the Pacific upon cessation 



of the war in Europe was approved. 

3. Foreign Trade Committee policy 
declarations covering Marine Insur- 
ance and the American Merchant 
Marine were approved. 

4. Street and Highway Committee 
reports endorsing the Junior Chamber 
plan for a "War Emergency Unified 
Transportation System" and the pro- 
posed M odesto- Yosemite Airline 
Highway were approved. 

5. A report from Mr. Kaiser of the 
Tax Committee was presented. 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Thursday, September 14, 1944 



Modesto- Yosemite Highway 
Plan Approved by S. F. C of C 



Junior C of C Plan 
for Better Street Car 
Service Endorsed 

The Unified Public Transportation 
Svstem plan of the Junior Chamber of 
Commerce, one of the main features of 
which is intended to increase streetcar 
service by 25% through increasing 
speed of service and reducing passenger 
congestion on street cars, has been en- 
dorsed in principle by the Board of Di- 
rectors of the San Francisco Chamber 
of Commerce, on the recommendation 
of the Street and Highway committee. 
•Principal means by which the plan 
seeks to increase the efficiency of 
streetcar service is through the estab- 
lishment of five major loops which 
could be accomplished at an estimated 
cost of §225,000 in approximately 
thirty days, the announcement stated. 

The proposed loops are as fol- 
lows: Geary-Sutter; McAllister- 
Turk; Sunset Tunnel-Haight; 
Kearney-Stockton, and Mission- 
Folsom. 

• If adopted, passenger carrying ca- 
pacity would be increased from 90,000 
to 120,000 per hour and the time re- 
quired between origin and destination 
would be greatly reduced. 

Full details of the plan were pre- 
sented by Junior Chamber of Com- 
merce representatives at a public hear- 
ing before the Public Utilities Com- 
mission September 1 1 . 



Berkeley C of C States 
Postwar Policies 

Ability of private enterprise to pro- 
vide high levels of business and indus- 
trial activity and maximum number of 
local jobs for Berkeley's postwar labor 
force can be increased or diminished, 
depending upon the policies which the 
Federal Government adopts toward 
postwar problems, according to Ray- 
mond M. Young, chairman, postwar 
committee, Berkeley Chamber. 

Young listed nine general prin- 
ciples adopted by his committee 
urging government encourage- 
ment of individual initiative and 
reduction of government agencies ; 
and opposing government compe- 
tition with business. 
• Young also advocated more gov- 
ernment economy and adjustment of 
taxes so as to encourage venture spirit. 



Endorsement of the Proposed 
Modesto-Yosemite Airline Highway, 
which would bring the Bay Area and 
northern section of the state 34 miles 
closer, via a natural water grade, to 
the Yosemite Valley, has been an- 
nounced by the Board of Directors of 
the San Francisco Chamber of Com- 
merce. 

• Completion of the new highway 
would be effected by the construction 
of only 28 miles of new road, at an es- 
timated cost of SI, "50, 000, connecting 
an existing highway east of Modesto 
with the All Year Highway at Brice- 
burg, the announcement said. Ap- 
proximately ten miles of the new con- 
struction could be provided for by the 
National Park Service at an estimated 
cost of $750,000, according to a letter 
from the Secretary of the Interior, con- 
curring on the desirability of the new 
construction as a postwar project. 

• Originally approved by the State 
of California, which earmarked funds 
for its share of construction costs, the 
project was shelved on the outbreak of 
war. As a result of the project's de- 
ferral, a renewal of its endorsement is 
desirable by the Chamber of Com- 
merce and interested groups in the Bay 
Area and Central California, in order 
to get the State to establish it for im- 
mediate postwar construction. 

The announcement also pointed 
out that abandonment of the Yo- 
semite Valley Railroad would make 
possible the utilization of part of 
the railroad right-of-way, thus 
reducing the cost considerably. 



Expanded S.F.-L.A. Air Service 
Announced by Western Air 

Three additional 21 -passenger planes 
are being added to Western Air Lines 
fleet, providing new air schedules 
which will double seat capacity on the 
San Francisco-Los Angeles route and 
break up traffic bottlenecks along the 
California-to-Canada network ac- 
cording to Roy Backman, local traffic 
manager. 

Starting tomorrow, September 
15, Western will operate six daily, 
non-stop, roundtrip flights be- 
tween the Bay Area and the 
Southland, Backman said. 



Four - Point Recommendation 
Advocated for Disposal 
Government Surplus Goods 

The Board of Directors enunciates ' 
as San Francisco Chamber of Com- 
merce policy the following recom-j 
mendation advanced by the Postwar] 
Planning Committee forForeignTrade] 
treating with "Disposition of United 
States Government-Owned Surplus 
Goods": 

"Surplus United States Govern- 
ment-owned foodstuffs, textiles 
and other consumer goods located 
abroad should be immediately re- 
leased for consumption in the gen- ; 
eral areas where situated and not 
be returned to the United States. 
Let distribution of these consumer 
goods surpluses first be through 
UNRRA, Red Cross and other re- 
lief agencies. After relief needs; 
have been supplied, let the bal-t 
ance of these consumer-goods sur- 
pluses first be offered for distribu- 
tion through the manufacturer of 
the goods or his agent. 

"Surplus United States Government-j 
owned durable and capital gooda 
abroad should be released only thr< nigh 
private-trade channels. Let manufac-| 
turers of these particular surplus goods 
have first opportunity to repurchase! 
them for resale abroad; or let theses 
surplus durable and capital goods be} 
turned back to related manufacturer} 
groups for orderly foreign distribution! 
by them, acting on a fee basis in be4 
half of the United States Government.] 

"Commercial distribution of I 
surplus goods, consumer, durable: 
and capital, including those bear- 
ing private brands, should be soldi 
through the American manufac- 
turer of the branded goods, or his> 
agent, if he so desires. Measures- 
should be taken to prevent any ofl 
these goods being returned to the 
United States by private buyers., 

"Foreign distribution of United' 
States Government - owned surplus 
goods should enjoy the expressed ac-j 
cord of the government within the 
country of distribution." 



Builders' Exchange Postwar Plans 

The Builders' Exchange of Alameda 
County has adopted a five-point ac-J 
tion program, according to an anf 
nouncement by the Oakland Chamber, 
designed to insure stabilization and 1 
co-ordination of the various building, 
trades in the postwar period of resi- 
dential and industrial construction. 



Thursday, September 14, 1944 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Members Give Views On Small Business Policy 



C. E. D. Announces 
New Federal Tax Plan 

Full employment and creation of 
millions of new jobs through expansion 
of private business as the goal of fed- 
eral tax revision after the war is aimed 
at in a set of tax recommendations re- 
cently issued by the Research Com- 
mittee of the Committee for Economic 
Development. 

Calling for a "new era in tax 
policy in the United States," the 
C.E.D. urges that federal taxes be 
substantially cut after the war is 
over and that main reliance for 
funds to run the federal govern- 
ment be placed on the personal 
income tax. 

• Taxes on corporate earnings, 
under the plan, would in effect be a 
pay-as-you-go tax on stockholders' 
income, similar to that now collected 
from business on wages paid out — and 
at the same rate. 

Virgil Reames, San Francisco 
Chamber, EXbrook 4511, Ext. 37, 
will take members' orders and 
send copies of the C.E.D. plan as 
soon as they are available. 



Course in Plastics Starts 
In San Francisco Friday 

Persons interested in plastics, their 
many types and applications, are in- 
vited to enroll for a course at the San 
Francisco Center of the University of 
California Extension Division, 540 
Powell Street, San Francisco, accord- 
ing to an announcement by the Cham- 
ber's Industrial Department. 
• Classes will be organized at 7:30 
P.M., Friday, September 15. The 
course will consist of two units of 
eight lectures each, one lecture to be 
delivered each Friday evening for 16 
weeks. 

George H. Brother of the West- 
ern Research Laboratory (Albany) 
of the U. S. Department of Agri- 
culture will conduct the course, 
concerning which further infor- 
mation may be obtained by tele- 
phoning the Center, EXbrook 
0100, or the Laboratory, Landscape 
5-2244. 



Christmas Exhibit at Mart 

An exhibit of Christmas merchan- 
dise is now being held at the Western 
Merchandise Mart. It will conclude 
tomorrow, September 15. 



Watsonville C of C 
Directors Attend 
Board Meeting Here 

A joint luncheon meeting between 
the boards of directors of Watsonville 
and San Francisco chambers will be 
held Thursday, September 21, in this 
city. 

• Such a meeting will carry forward 
the San Francisco Chamber's policy of 
holding inter-community meetings 
with businessmen of Northern Cali- 
fornia, according to Arthur Towne, 
Chairman, Domestic Trade Com- 
mitte. 

"The development and main- 
tenance of good-will between the 
metropolis of Northern California 
and its neighboring cities contigu- 
ous thereto, cannot but result in a 
higher degree of collaboration 
which may stand all elements in 
good stead in the postwar era," 
commented Victor H. Tuttle, vice 
chairman, Food Industries Com- 
mittee, Chamber of Commerce 
and Agriculture of the Pajaro Val- 
ley, in endorsing the meeting. 



Oakland C of C Publishes 
Vacation Here Pamphlet 

"Spend Your Vacations and Week- 
Ends at Home," an illustrated pam- 
phlet on where to go on the East side 
of the Bay on one streetcar token or 
one gallon of gas, has just been pre- 
pared by the Oakland Chamber, ac- 
cording to Harold D. Weber, general 
manager. 

The eight-page folder is part of the 
Oakland Chamber current program to 
reduce unnecessary travel and urge 
war workers and citizens to enjoy and 
visit points of interest in the area. 



Ohioan Wants Business Here 

Purchase of "a small or medium 
sized hardware, mill supply or manu- 
facturing plant" is the objective of a 
present Ohio resident who wants to lo- 
cate in the San Francisco Bay Region. 
Persons knowing of an opportunity 
that would meet these specifications 
are requested to communicate with 
the Chamber's Industrial Depart- 
ment — EXbrook 4511. 



When the Chamber's Industrial De- 
partment recently polled the member- 
ship in regard to the general subject of 
"government and 'small' business," 
125 of 451 members who made out re- 
turns appended "remarks" covering 
wide varieties of subjects and views. 
While some members urged votes 
for certain political office candidates 
to cure all ills, others were brief with 
"less government in business — more 
business in government," and it is not 
possible to quote all of the remarks 
which serve as a guide to Chamber 
policies; the following are four repre- 
sentative ones, and more will be 
quoted in Bay Region Business from 
time to time: 

"Private capital will finance any 
business whose economic exist- 
ence is justified. As an individual I 
do not wish to be taxed to do so." 

"Many ill-advised ventures by 
the inexperienced can be expected 
following the war and it is neces- 
sary, if consequent losses are to be 
avoided, that these undertakings 
be curbed ; preferably by the nor- 
mal critical checks that a private 
bank is likely to impose." 

"The argument that freeing 
business from government inter- 
ference will provide sufficient em- 
ployment is stupid nonsense." 

"No small business can be 
started under present tax laws. 
Present small business cannot ac- 
cumulate capital for expansion 
and without expansion cannot 
hire new help after close of war. 
This business now employs 11 
people. Within two years after the 
war our employment can be ex- 
panded many times provided tax 
laws were so revised as to permit 
retention of earnings." 



Factory or Mercantile 
Business Wanted Here 

Having sold his Detroit manufac- 
turing business to a larger organiza- 
tion, a substantial business man is 
seeking outright purchase or at least 
control of a sound manufacturing or 
mercantile business in the San Fran- 
cisco Bay Area. An enterprise requir- 
ing S200.000 or more is indicated. 

If you know of a qualifying busi- 
ness for sale or in which control 
would be exchanged for additional 
capital in substantial sums, please 
communicate with the Chamber's 
Industrial Department — EXbrook 
4511. 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Thursday, September 14, 1944 



FOREIGN TRADE TIPS 



The Chamber of Commerce cannot under- 
take to guarantee the financial standing and 
responsibility of any firm or individual men- 
tioned in TRADE TIPS, and it is suggested 
that the usual investigation be made in each 
instance. For further details regarding an 
item call the World Trade Department of the 
San Francisco Chamber of Commerce, EX- 
brook 45 1 1 , and refer to inquiry by the Trade 
Tip's number. 



3437 OFFERS FROM MEXICO 

Wholesalers and jobbers wishing to receive free 
of charge, bi-weekly. "Offers from Mexico." a 
list of opportunities for various articles difficult 
to obtain and offered by serious Mexican manu- 
facturers and exporters. Write: Mex-Curios. 
P. O. Box 2554. Mexico. D. F.. Mexico. 

Hi. PRODUCTS FROM URUGUAY 

Compania Uruguaya de Intercambio Panameri- 
cano. S. de R. L.. Rincon 454, Montevideo. 
Uruguay, is in position to export ready-made 
goods, raw materials, semi -fabricated products. 

3439 EXPORTATION TO ARGENTINA 

Osinalde & Cammarota. Lavalle 1473. Buenos 
Aires. Argentina, wants to be put in touch with 
manufacturers and exporters of aeronautical 
material? and precision tools. 

3440 ARGENTINE ARTICLES 

Casa Frank. Sarmiento 1999. Buenos Aires, Ar- 
gentina, desires to export wallets, belts, portrait 



frarr 



: kinds of purses. 



3441 REPRESENTATION IN PERU 

L. M. Stone & Cia.. Amargura 932. Lima. Peru. 
seek representation of San Francisco manu- 
facturers and exporters of general merchandise. 

3442 FIBER TWINE 

Rio Grande Exporting Co.. 1251 Levee Street. 
Brownsville Texa>. i< interested in selling com- 
mercial fiber twine in car lots. 

3443 BUSINESS WITH PERU 

Jack Weinhaunsen, Editicio Gallos. Oficina 360. 
Casilla 571. Lima. Peru, seeks contact with 
manufacturers and exporters of general mer- 
chandise, lor their representation in Peru. 

3444 METAL BEDS 

Morey & Morey. Aparlado 1407, Ponce. Puerto 



■sted in the Puerto Rican trade. 

3445 LEATHER PRODUCTS 

Modeca. Charcas 976. Buenos Aires. Argentina, 
wants to export various types of leather products. 



3446 EXPORTATION TO PERU 



J. F. Portugal Hijos. S.A.. Casilla 17. Arequipa. 
Peru, desire to import paper, office and desk sup- 
plies, tools, chemical products, etc. They w; 
represent mam 



. of these articles. 



> 23. San 
Salvador. El Salvador, Central America, is in- 
terested in obtaining a great variety of textiles, 
fancv products, novelties, canned goods, hard- 
ware, toys. etc. 

3448 CLOTHESPINS 

Las Arte? de Mexico. Avenida 16 de Septiembre, 
6-112, Mexico D. F.. Mexico, is able to furnish 
any quantities of clothespins with metal spring 
for exportation. Prices and samples are available 
at the World Trade Department. 

3449 ELECTRICAL APPLIANCES 

John Bradley, care of Martin Doorly & Co.. Ltd.. 
P. O. Box 220. Barbados. BAY. I., is interested in 
lundlinc apency <<i manufacturers of household 
gadgets, electrical appliances and all new types 
of products. 

3450 AGENT FROM ARGENTINA 

Buenos Aires export firm wishes to appoint repre- 
sentative on a commission basis, for textiles, 
leather articles, ribbons, etc. Interested people 
are requested to write immediately: Compania 
Exin-rtaJura Sudatricana. Corrientes 424. Buenos 
Aires. Argentina. 



Symposium on China 
To Start September 18 

A three-session symposium on 
China, the first in a group of symposi- 
ums on "Meet Your Neighbor . . . The 
World," will be presented by the 
World Trade Committee of the San 
Francisco Junior Chamber of Com- 
merce in the San Francisco Com- 
mercial Club. 

Sessions will be held at 12:00 noon, 
and the program is as follows: 
Monday, SEPT. 18— JAMES SHEN, Direc- 
tor Chinese News Service. 
Monday, OCT. 2— JULEAN ARNOLD. 
Former American Commercial Attache 
to China. 
Monday, OCT. 16— ERNEST B. PRICE. 
Director of the Institute of Pacific 
Relations. 

Reservations are required in ad- 
vance, and may be made by call- 
ing the Junior Chamber, EXbrook 
4511. 



FOREIGN TRADE TIPS^»w 

3451 REPRESENTATION IN CUBA 

Rafel Fernadez Granadillo, Apartado 443 La 
Habana, Cuba, is interested in representing 
manufacturers and exporters of food products, 
sanitary equipment, jute and cotton bags, tin- 
foils, etc. 
SPECIAL NOTICE: The Brazilian Government 
Trade Bureau. 551 Fifth Avenue. New York, 17 X. V . 
has suppUed a Brazilian Bulletin in the English lan- 
guage, which contains trade opportunities and other 
valuable trade information. Those interested may see 
the bulletin by calling at the World Trade Department 

NOTICE TO EXPORTERS: Exporters of goods 

(except foodstuff?) subjai t<> quota allocatx-ns are invited 
to list products with World Trade Department so that 
the San Francisco Chamber's Washington Office may 
telegraph immediately when quotas are. or are about 
to be, established. 



Published weekly at 333 Pine St., San Francisco, 
Zone 4, County of San Francisco. California. Will 
Williams, Editor. Telephone EXbrook 4511. Sub- 
scription, Fifty Cents a Year (Included in Annual 
Dues). Entered as Second Class matter April 26. 
1944. at the Post Office at San Francisco, Cali- 
fornia, under the act of March 3, 1870. 



The San Francisco Chamber of Commerce 

333 Plna Street, San Francisco 4 
EXbrook 4511 



DOMESTIC TRADE TIPS 



A digest of correspondence received from 
those desiring, or offering, lines of merchan- 
dise for representation. They are listed here 
as a service without necessarily bearing en- 
dorsement by the Chamber. For further de- 
tails, contact the Domestic Trade Depart- 
ment, EXbrook 4511, Ext. 56. 

D-6049-L. C. BAILEY. SALES MANA- 
GER, SMITH-JOHNSON, 727 East Pico 
Blvd., Los Angeles, California, wish to sell line 
of lubricating products through local agent. 

D-6050— B. GINSBURG, WAVERLY 
SUGAR COMPANY, Waverly, Iowa, inter- 
ested in contacting agent to handle brewery 
products locally. 

D-6051— GEORGE B. EDGAR, THE 
EDGAR STEEL SEAL AND MANUFAC- 
TURING COMPANY. Lawrence, Kansas, 
wish to open jobbers account in this area for 
sale of hurelar-nroof car seals 



CofC Representatives at 
Supervisors' Meeting 

Attending the Board of Super- 
visors meeting, Monday, Sep- 
tember 1 1 . were : 

E. J. McClanahan, member, 
San Francisco Chamber Board. 

Henry F. Budde, Sr., mem- 
ber. Chamber's Municipal Af- 
fairs Committee. 



RADIO 



• Thursday, September 14, 11:15- 
11 :-t5 p.m. — Transcribed broadcast of 
Hon. Joseph R. Farrington speech at 
noon, Thursday. 

• Saturday, September 16, 3:15- 
3:45 p.m. — Business Views the News. 
This week, a round-up of business 
events. 



Sec. 562 P. L. & R. 
U. S. POSTAGE 





* W PUBLISHED BY THI 

SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 



Volume 



Thursday, September 21, 1944 



Number 25 



WASHINGTON NOTES 



• Cutbacks — It is the opinion of 
Washington officials and aircraft 
manufacturers that when the Euro- 
pean war ends there will be cutbacks 
amounting to 35 per cent on an aver- 
age for the industry. However, it is 
believed here that 75 per cent of this 
cutback will be in the East and Middle 
West and only 25 per cent on the 
Pacific Coast. 

•Ration Point Adjustment — The 
Office of Price Administration has an- 
nounced that provision has been made 
for retailers to apply to their local war 
price and rationing boards for an ad- 
justment if they suffer point losses 
in excess of 25 per cent of their allow- 
able inventories because of the re- 
moval of processed food items from 
rationing. 

• "Paper holidays" are being de- 
clared in cities and towns throughout 
the country in an effort to stretch 
limited supplies of paper, the War 
Production Board has announced. 
During the "paper holidays," retail 
merchants will use no bags or wrap- 
ping paper, except for articles that re- 
quire wrapping for sanitary and pro- 
tective purposes. 

• Ceiling Price Adjustment — 
Wholesalers who are selling commodi- 
ties at OPA ceilings that are below the 
March 1942 minimum prices for sales 
by wholesalers established under State 
Fair Trade Acts may in some cases ap- 
ply for an adjustment of their ceilings, 
according to the Office of Price Ad- 
ministration. 

• Total new construction activity in 
the United States in August amounted 
to S316,000,000, a 2 per cent increase 
over the previous month's level of 
8310,000,000, but less than half the 
$638,000,000 volume of August 1943. 

From the Chamber's Washington Office. 



WPB Establishes New Policy 

For Gold Mining Firms 



Huge Factory Product 
Demand In Prospect 
According to Fox 

Whereas the population of the 
five Bay Area counties has in- 
creased about 23T- since 1940 and 
the population of California has 
gained about 15%, during the war 
period, San Francisco bank de- 
posits have gone up more than a 
full 100^, indicating a huge pent- 
up demand for all types of prod- 
ucts, including those made in the 
Bay Area. 

So said G. L. Fox, Manager of the 
Chamber's Industrial Department, in 
an address before the Richmond Rota- 
ry Club last week. 

• Fox reviewed fundamentals per- 
taining to Bay Area factory growth 
and presented statistical data justify- 
ing optimism with regard to economic 
conditions in central California. 



Warehouse Space Obtained 
for Over Quota Coffee Storage 

Permission to store over - quota 
coffee discharged at San Francisco in 
non-bonded warehouse space has been 
granted by the Commissioner of Cus- 
toms, according to information re- 
ceived by William L. Montgomery, 
manager. World Trade Department, 
San Francisco Chamber of Commerce, 
from Frank E. Marsh, Chamber's 
Washington Office Manager. 

Permission was granted after 
Marsh's services were secured to ex- 
plain the situation existing in San 
Francisco whereby so much of the 
warehouse space is taken up by the 
military that little of any kind is avail- 
able for normal commercial business. 



A new policy to permit gold mining 
firms to obtain materials and equip- 
ment needed for rehabilitation of 
properties and machinery has just 
been prepared by the War Production 
Board, according to information re- 
ceived from the Chamber's Washing- 
ton office. 

Purpose of the new policy, which is 
made in anticipation of the revocation 
of Order L-208 by the War Production 
Board, is to make mines available for 
immediate operation at that time. 

Revocation of the order is expected 
to take place on "X" day, the an- 
nouncement indicated. 



Member for 64 Years 
Renews Subscription 

"Somewhere in the annals of the 
San Francisco Chamber of Commerce 
fur the year 1880 is listed an event of 
which the Chamber can rightly be 
proud," Louis B. Lundborg, general 
manager, declared today. 

"That event was the addition 
of a certain new member to our 
organization. 

"On the first of September, M. Hall 
McAllister, retired San Francisco busi- 
nessman, now of Redlands, California, 
sent a communication to the Chamber. 

"That communication renewed his 
membership for the 64th vear — from 
1880 to 1944. That's a tribute!" 



*=^~ RADIO ^^~ 

• Monday, September 25, 12 45 - 
1:00 p.m. — War of Enterprise, a 
dramatization of American Industry 
at war, prepared by the Chamber of 
Commerce of the United States and 
sponsored in San Francisco by the 
San Francisco Chamber. 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Thursday, September 21, 1944 



C of C Policy on Federal 

Spending Commended 



SJ VACOS Announce 
Progress on Cotton 
Production Survey 

Comprehensive survey of cotton 
textile production prospects in the San 
Joaquin Valley will soon get under- 
way, it was announced recently by the 
San Joaquin Valley Association of 
Commercial Organization Secretaries 
(SJVACOS), when the association re- 
vealed that the firm of Lockwood 
Greene Engineers. Inc., New York 
City, had been engaged to handle the 
project. 

• Extent of cotton production and 
markets which could use cotton prod- 
ucts manufactured in the valley will 
be questions answered by the survey, 
M. W. Phillips, chairman, special Cot- 
ton Textile Project of the Association 
stated. 

Kern, Tulare and Kings counties 
will finance the program which 
has had the active interest of the 
San Francisco Chamber's Indus- 
trial Dept. 



S. F. to Keep Office of 
National Railway of Mexico 

Instructions for closing the San 
Francisco General Agency Office of 
the National Railways of Mexico, an- 
nounced mid-August, have been can- 
celed, according to a wire from Benja- 
min Mendez, Traffic Manager, Na- 
tional Railways, to Felipe N. Puente, 
who has served as General Agent in 
the office since its establishment in 
1924. 

When decision to close the office 
was announced in August, the 
San Francisco Chamber called 
upon 150 of its members trading 
with Mexico to join in asking re- 
consideration of the decision, be- 
cause of the value of services ren- 
dered to importers, exporters and 
travelers here. 

• As a result, closure of the office has 
been abandoned. 



Airlines Contract for 
High Speed Transports 

United Air Lines, American Air- 
lines, and Pan American-Grace have 
ordered 93 high speed postwar trans- 
ports costing §50,000,000, according 
to a United announcement last week. 



. The San Francisco Chamber of Com- 
merce statement of policy toward fed- 
eral spending has been commended by 
Utah, Arizona, Arkansas and Tennes- 
see taxpayers' associations. 

For instance, in the Arizona 
Associations Taxpayers' Maga- 
zine, the Chamber's statement 
was described as "one of the clear- 
est and most important state- 
ments that has come out of the 
maze of postwar planning." 

• The statement of policy, prepared 
by the Chamber's Tax Committee 
under the chairmanship of Leland M. 
Kaiser, consists of a recapitulation of 
the condition of the federal treasury, 
which leads to the conclusion that 
"A sound government can rest only on 
a sound fiscal policy, and a sound fis- 
cal policy is dependent upon a budget 
in balance except in limited periods of 
extreme emergency." 

Guided by the principle that 
"only private enterprise can fi- 
nance government," the commit- 
tee outlined a series of eight pol- 
icies. 

• Anyone interested in obtaining 
copies of this statement of policy may 
do so by calling Carroll Snyker, Do- 
mestic Trade Department. 

Oakland Airport 
Improvements Told 

Oakland Municipal Airport on com- 
pletion of present improvement pro- 
gram will represent an investment of 
approximately S11,000,000, according 
to A. H. Abel, port manager and chief 
engineer. 

• Development program planned 
for the airport in addition to improve- 
ments now under way will include 
building of terminal facilities for ocean 
carriers in San Leandro Bay. 

New Product Available 

Bay Area manufacture of a dry 
cleaning machine invented and per- 
fected in San Francisco is sought by a 
local business man. The machine may 
be produced in various sizes and its 
use is said to improve work and serv- 
ice, being suitable for use by retail 
shop owners, cleaning establishments 
in small communities, laundries and 
department stores. The machine con- 
sists of tanks, valves, pumps, piping 
and other metal units and would re- 
quire production facilitiesaccordingly. 

Anyone interested should call the 
Chamber's Industrial Department — 
EXbrook4511. 



S. F. Businessmen Approve 
WPB's Green Light for 
Civilian Goods Production 

Decision by top mobilization and 
production authorities in Washington, 
D. C, to lift civilian production con- 
trols is consistent with repeatedly ex- 
pressed demands of San Francisco 
businessmen, according to Adrien J. 
Falk, president of the San Francisco 
Chamber. 

"While all parties concerned will 
continue to do their utmost to expe- 
dite victory over Japan, progress in 
Europe already has tended to empha- 
size the necessity of eliminating 'red 
tape' for manufacturers seeking to en- 
gage in civilian production," he said. 

"Full effect of the decision 
reached in Washington last week, 
so far as the Bay Area is concerned, 
will be contingent on administra- 
tion of manpower controls in this 
region," Falk declared. 
% Falk added: "As cutbacks are im- 
posed with the clearing up of the 
European situation, the San Francisco 
Chamber has been determined that 
except for sheer war necessities the 
same opportunities must be afforded 
here for resumption of civilian produc- 
tion to enable factory facilities and I 
manpower to be employed as would I 
obtain elsewhere. 

"Uniform application of the new 
WPB policies throughout the na- 
tion is essential to local economy 
as well as such continued war pro- 
duction and the retention of war 
workers as will be required here." 

C of C Reaffirms Stand 
on Initiative Measure 

Adrien J. Falk, President of the San 
Francisco Chamber of Commerce, has 
issued the following statement: 

On April 5, 1944, when petitions 
were being circulated to qualify the 
"Right to Work" initiative measure 
for the November ballot, the Board of 
Directors went on record in opposition 
to the proposal. 

The Board has re-examined this 
measure in the light of its having 
qualified for a place on the November 
ballot as Proposition No. 12, and re- 1 
affirmed its position, with this state- 
ment: 

"In our opinion, this issue wills 
cause dissension between industry 
and labor at a time when it is vitall 
to unite for the undeviating prose- 
cution of the war and the main- 
tenance of essential production. 
Therefore, the Board of Directors, 
unanimously opposes this initia- 
tive measure." 



Thursday, September 21, 1944 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



San Francisco Program for 
Victory Fleet Day Observance 

Victory Fleet Day, marking the 
third anniversary of the birth of the 
wartime merchant fleet and dedicated 
to the shipping companies, will be 
celebrated here on Wednesday, Sep- 
tember 27. 

• The program will include 
assembling of shipping line representa- 
tives at the City Hall to receive pen- 
nants from a War Shipping Adminis- 
tration official in recognition of effi- 
cient wartime management and op- 
eration of shipping lines. 

This ceremony will be followed 
by a luncheon and formal inspec- 
tion of the United States Mari- 
time Service Center at 1000 Geary 
Street, which will be dedicated on 
that day. 

Committee handling plans for 
the observance is headed by Hugh 
Gallagher, vice-president of the 
Matson Navigation Company. 



Food Foundation Starts 

A Northern California Food Proces- 
sors Foundation is being established at 
"ollege of the Pacific, Stockton, for 
:he purpose of studying the "human 
•elations factor in production, pro- 
:essing and distribution of the food 
Droducts of this section of California," 
iccording to an announcement by 
Robert E. Burns, assistant to the 
President, College of the Pacific. 

The Foundation is being financed 
)y a number of food processing plants 
n California. 

"Food processing is one of the 
argest industries in the area," 
:ommented Burns. "Through this 
:ollege affiliation, the industry is 
>reparing capable leadership and 
>etter understanding for the fu- 
:ure." 



>WPC Sponsors Contract 
termination Meet Friday 

On Friday, September 22, between 
0:00 a.m. and noon, the Smaller War 
■^ants Corporation is presenting a 
neeting outlining the problem con- 
ained in contract termination and 
ettlement. 

I The Chamber has co-operated 
nth SW'PC in scheduling the meeting 
vhich will be held in the PG&E Audi- 
orium. 245 Market Street. Officers 
rom the several local Service con- 
racting agencies will give explanatory 
alks on the various major aspects of 
erminatiun. followed by a question 
nd answer period. 

All persons interested are invited. 



Eight Traffic, Transit 
Recommendations 
Approved by C of C 

Eight recommendations concerning 
San Francisco traffic and transit poli- 
cies have been approved by the Board 
of Directors of the San Francisco 
Chamber on recommendation of the 
Chamber's Street and Highway Com- 
mittee in an effort to bring about early 
clarification of postwar objectives in 
this field along practical lines. 

These declarations of policy are 
the outgrowth of several months 
investigation and study by the 
Street and Highway Committee 
and are tied in closely to the ex- 
perience of those who have given 
time and attention to considera- 
tion of ways and means for better- 
ing traffic and transit conditions 
in San Francisco. 

• The report deals with the follow- 
ing subjects: (\) Street Circulatory 
System streets, parking, traffic regu- 
lations); (2 Mas> Transportation; 
(3) State Highways; (4) Traffic Edu- 
cation ; ( 5) Fiscal Problems; (6) Traffic 
and Transit Co-ordination. 

A printed pamphlet containing the 
declarations of policy and supporting 
statements is available to members 
and may be obtained from the Cham- 
ber's Research Department. 

In succeeding issues of "Bay 
Region Business" one or more of 
these policies will be presented. 



Berkeley C of C Surveys 
Postwar Job Needs 

"How many postwar jobs must this 
community provide?" — this is the 
question now being considered by the 
postwar committee of the Berkeley 
Chamber of Commerce. 
• Provision of jobs for returning 
servicemen and women and for war 
workers who intend to remain in this 
area has been taken up by the com- 
mittee for studv and action. 



Small Manufacturing Business 
Sought in Bay Region 

Experienced in business manage- 
ment and finance, a young man seeks 
to acquire half or full interest in a San 
Francisco Buy Area manufacturing 
business, his investment to be between 
$10,000 and $20,000. Persons having 
such opportunities are in\ ited to com- 
municate with the Chamber's Indus- 
trial Department — EXbrook 4511. 



Keep Adequate Merchant 
Marine, Says Chamber 
in Policy Declaration 

The following policy was enunciated 
by the San Francisco Chamber Board 
of Directors on recommendation of the 
Pi 'stwar Planning Committee for For- 
eign Trade and after approval by the 
Foreign Trade Committee : 

"American Merchant Marine — 
We favor and support the follow- 
ing declaration of national policy 
respecting our American Marine, 
as set forth in the Merchant Mar- 
ine Act of 1936: 

'It is necessary for the national de- 
fense and development of its foreign 
and domestic commerce that the 
United States shall have a Merchant 
Marine, (a) sufficient to carry its do- 
mestic water-borne commerce and a 
substantial portion of the water-borne 
export and import foreign commerce 
of the United States and to provide 
shipping service on all routes essential 
for maintaining the flow of such do- 
mestic and foreign water-borne com- 
merce at all times, (b) capable of serv- 
ing as a naval and military auxiliary 
in time of war or national emergency, 
(c) owned and operated under the 
United States flag by citizens of the 
United. States insofar as may be prac- 
ticable, and (d) composed of the best- 
equipped, safest, and most suitable 
types of vessels, constructed in the 
I nited States and manned with a 
trained and efficient citizen personnel. 
It is hereby declared to be the policy 
of the United States to foster the de- 
velopment and encourage the main- 
tenance of such a Merchant Marine.' 
"Every safeguard should be 
taken to prevent our again disin- 
tegrating into a second-rate mer- 
chant sea power as has already oc- 
curred twice in our national his- 
tory. We are against subsidies in 
principle; however, if necessary to 
maintain a strong merchant ma- 
rine in the face of foreign competi- 
tion, subsidies should be granted. 
If subsidies or other type of assist- 
ance be given steamship opera- 
tors, they should enable them to 
maintain parity with, but not ad- 
vantages over, other ship operat- 
ing nations. The merchant marine 
should be maintained at all times 
at a strength that would enable 
the United States to carry a mini- 
mum of fifty per cent of its off- 
shore water bound commerce on 
its own bottoms. 

"The United States Maritime Com- 
mission should turn over vessels now 
under its ownership to responsible pri- 
(Continued on Page 4) 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Thursday, September 21, 1944 



FOREIGN TRADE TIPS 



The Chamber cannot guarantee any firm or 
individual mentioned in TRADE TIPS. It is 
suggested the usual investigation be made in 
each instance. For details call World Trade 
Department, EXbrook 4511, and refer to the 
Trade Tip's number. 



i be put in touch with manufactu 

3454 THROAT TABLETS 

Guillermo E. Molina. Plaza de Cisneros. Barno 
Guayaquil. Medellin. Colombia, is interested in 
contacting drug manufacturers who might be in- 
terested in making throat tablets, on the basis of 
Mr. Molina's formula, which is available at the 
World Trade Department Office. 

3455 SERVICE OFFERS 

Sluter and Llinas Ltda.. Calle 13. No. 8-34. 
Bogota, Colombia, offer their services to manu- 
facturers and importers regarding business with 
Colombia. Full information is available at the 
World Trade Department. 

3456 REPRESENTATION IN COLOMBIA 
Victor Romero Villa, apartado aereo 143. Bar- 
ranquilla. Colombia, is anxious to represent 
manufacturers and exporters of fish, canned 
foods, fruits, wines, etc. 

3457 TRADE WITH BRAZIL 

Publicidade Dial Brasileira. Avenida Rio Branco, 
128, s/1512, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, desires to 
represent in that country any kind of American 
products, as well as to accept publicity contracts 
for advertising American articles throughout the 
country. 

3458 CHILEAN COMMODITIES 

Chilean Wine and Food Export Company. San- 
tiago, Chile, wants to contact importers of food- 
stuffs, wines, brandies, champagnes, etc. 

3459 REPRESENTATION FROM CHILE 
Martin Duran R., Agustinas 972. Casilla 4005. 
Santiago. Chile, exporter of agricultural and 
other products, wants to appoint representative 
in San Francisco. 

3460 MENTHOL FROM BRAZIL 
Baranowsky & Cia. Ltda., Rua Xavier de Toledo, 
121, Caixa Postal 970, Sao Paulo, Brazil, wish to 
enter into contact with importers of menthol. 

3461 CANDIES TO CANADA 

MacKelvies Limited, National Storage Building. 
Winnipeg. Canada, seeks contact with manu- 
facturers and exporters of candied nuts, candied 
fruits and sweetened gums. 

3462 AGENCY IN CANADA 

Watson's, 4756 Elm Street. Vancouver, Canada, 
is desirous of obtaining agencies of manufacturers 
of marine hardware and equipment, and photo- 
graphic supplies and equipment. 

3463 REPRESENTATION IN NICARAGUA 

Jose D. Lozano. Lido Palace Hotel. Managua, 
Nicaragua. Central America, seeks the repre- 
sentation of American firms; exporters of second- 
hand machinery, novelties, paints, etc. 

3464 BUSINESS WITH PERU 

Abelardo Barreto, Calle Libertad numero 520, 
Piura, Peru, is anxious to represent manufac- 
turers and exporters of general merchandise. 

3465 TRADE WITH MEXICO 

Jose Capin, Mesones 26, apartado 7283, Mexico 
D.F., Mexico, is interested in representing manu- 
facturers of synthetic fiber, textiles, plastic ma- 
terials for construction, chemicals, hardware, etc. 

3466 EXPORTATION TO ECUADOR 

J. Moncayo & Cia., Casilla 570, Guayaquil, 
Ecuador, wish contact with exporters of rebuilt 
machines, stationary, second-hand machinery, 
etc., for their representation in that country. 

3467 TRADE OPPORTUNITIES 

M. W. Carter. Merchandise Mart. 1155 Market 
Street. Room 442, San Francisco, California. 
MA-0881, leaving in October for a business de- 
velopment tour of Mexico. Central and South 
America, is available for interviews with manu- 
facturers and exporters looking towards export 
agency establishment. 

3468 ARGENTINE PRODUCTS 

Reimex S. R. L., Avenida de Mayo 1370, Buenos 
Aires, Argentina, is anxious to contact American 
importers of leather articles, handbags; also 
salted sausage casings, etc. 

3469 SPORT CLOTHING 

Cobar y Hermosillo. apartado 223. Guatemala 
City. Guatemala, is interested in relations with 
manufacturers and wholesalers of sport clothing, 
sweaters, etc. 

3470 COMMODITIES TO IRAQ 

A. Raphael, P.O. Box 24. Basrah. Iraq, wants to 
be put in touch with manufacturers of textiles, 
rayon goods, electrical products, crockery, filing 
cabinets, steel and iron safes, etc., lor their repre- 
sentation in that country. 



Merchant Marine Policy 

(Continued from Page 3) 
vate operators as soon as possible after 
termination of the war on terms which 
would enable purchasers to pay off 
obligations to government within a 
reasonable length of time and obtain 
a fair return on invested capital. Such 
a policy would attract sound capital to 
invest in steamship ownership and 
would also guarantee government re- 
payment for ships disposed to private 
operators on a term basis. 

"Some excess American tonnage 
should be turned over to allied 
and friendly nations whose mer- 
chant marine has been depleted in 
war service. Any transactions of 
this nature, however, should only 
be on a basis of actual payment 
for vessels, even though on liberal 
repayment terms, at a price not 
less than the price similar vessels 
are offered to American-flag op- 
erators." 



FOREIGN TRADE TIPS-cw;w 

3471 BUSINESS WITH AUSTRALIA 

Colin Steele. 172 Beattie Street, Balmain. 
Sydney. N. S. W., Australia, desires connections 
with manufacturers of poker and slot machines, 
juke boxes and all forms of automatic dispensing 
and amusement machines. 

3472 REPRESENTATION IN ECUADOR 

Carlos A. Gutierrez Hill, apartado postal 540. 

Guayaquil, Ecuador, is interested in securing the 

selling agency of packer of California sardines, 

packed in oval tins. 
SPECIAL NOTICE: We have received from 
Pazmino Bulnes e hijos. Caracas, Venezuela, an inter- 
esting "Indice Industrial y Comercial de Venezuela" 
which contains, well classified, more than 15,000 com- 
mercial, industrial, economic, etc., firms of Venezuela. 
Those interested may see it at the World Trade De- 
partment Office. 



Published weekly at 3Z3 Pine St., San Fr 
Zone 4, County of San Francisco, California. Will 
Williams, Editor. Telephone EXbrook 4511. Sub- 
scription, Fifty Cents a Year (Included in Annual 
Dues). Entered as Second Class matter April 26, 
1944, at the Post Office at San Fr 
fornia, under the act of March 3, 1S70. 



The San Francisco Chamber of Commerce 

333 Pine Street, San Francisco 4 
EXbrook 45 11 



DOMESTIC TRADE TIPS 



A digest of correspondence received from thosi 
desiring, or offering, lines of merchandise fo: 
representation. They are listed here as a service 
without necessarily bearing endorsement by th< 
Chamber. For further details, contact the Domes 
tic Trade Department, EXbrook 4511, Ext. 56. 



D-6052— MARTIN" LEW, MIL-MAR 
HOME SUPPLY COMPANY, 2559 North 
Hollywood Street, Philadelphia, 32, Pennsyl- 
vania, wishes to contact San Francisco re- 
tailers or manufacturers who desire repre- 
sentative to buy for them in the East. 

D-6053— CARROLL LUNT, PLASTIC 
MOLDED PRODUCTS, INC., 1505 North 
Western Avenue, Hollywood, 27, California, 
offers services to manufacturers in selling 
products in Western States and outside the 
country. 

D-6054— M. D. KINTISCH, 291 Central 
Avenue, Albany, New York, wishes to repre- 
sent local manufacturers in his area. 

D-6055— GUS B. YALKUE, 1814 Allen 
Building, Dallas, Texas, wishes to place at the 
disposal of local manufacturers his manufac- 
turers agency contacting the electrical field in 
Texas-Oklahoma territory- 

D-6056— ALLAN CUTLER, Davenport 
Hotel, Spokane, Washington, wishes to con- 
tact local manufacturers of transportation 
vehicles, household appliances and associated 
products, to represent them in Eastern Wash- 
ington and Northern Idaho. 



CofC Representatives at 
Supervisors' Meeting 

Attending the Board of Super- 
visors meeting, Monday, Sep- 
tember 18, were: 

John C. McPherson, mem- 
ber, San Francisco Chamber 
Board. 

H. B. Harding, member, 
Chamber's Municipal Affairs 
Committee. 




W J PUBLISHED BY THE 

SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 



Volume 



Thursday, September 28, 1944 



Number 26 



WASHINGTON NOTES 



• Surplus War Property — Accord- 
ing to Surplus War Property News- 
etter, "Here are a few of the subjects 
an which under the law the Surplus 
Property Board must issue regula- 
tions: public notice of surplus avail- 
able; disposition of surplus to states 
and institutions; property to be given 
iway; offering of airports, harbors to 
states and cities; price policies; dis- 
posal of scrap; purchases by veterans; 
protection of small business; purchase 
Df land by former owners; purchase 
af land by veterans; restriction of sur- 
plus property imports." 

• Sacramento Conference — The 

Special Committee of the Senate to 
Investigate Industrial Centralization, 
of which Senator McCarran of Nevada 
is Chairman, is making plans to con- 
duct a conference in Sacramento on 
October 13 and 14, at which time an 
effort will be made to secure from 
Western industry recommendations 
which might be the basis for legisla- 
tion which would provide for the 
establishment of additional industry 
on the West Coast. 

• Ores — H. R. 4852, a bill to insure 
the preservation of technical and eco- 
nomic records of domestic sources of 
ores of metals and minerals, has been 
reported out from the Committee on 
Mines and Mining. Of special interest 
to those requiring such information is 
a statement in the bill that the policy 
of the Bureau of Mines should be to 
make public as rapidly as possible all 
data in its possession, the publication 
of which does not affect the national 
security or which does not concern the 
evaluation of private property. 

From the Chamber's Washington Office. 



Have You Registered ? 
DEADLINE TODAY 

September 28 



Group to Advise on 
Financing Postwar 
Projects Requested 

On the suggestion of Leland M. 
Kaiser, chairman, San Francisco 
Chamber of Commerce Tax Commit- 
tee, the Board of Supervisors has 
requested Mayor Roger D. Lapham 
to appoint a committee to study, con- 
sult with and advise the Board and 
the City Planning Commission in se- 
lecting best methods for financing 
postwar projects for San Francisco 
which are determined as desirable and 
practical. 

Kaiser's suggestion was the re- 
sult of a number of conferences 
with retail and business interests 
in San Francisco. 

This committee will consist of ex- 
perts in municipal finance and taxa- 
tion. 

Kelly Named Chairman of 

New "Work Pile" Committee 

Formation of a "Work Pile" Com- 
mittee with Earl Lee Kelly, vice presi- 
dent. Bank of America, N. T. & S. A., 
and San Francisco Chamber of Com- 
merce Board member, as chairman, 
has been announced by Chamber 
President Adrien J. Falk. 

The new committee's task will 
be to direct the final phase of 
completion of the "Work Pile" 
plan and activate translation of 
reports into actual jobs. 

Northern California Meet 

William M.Jeffers, president, Union 
Pacific Railroad Company, will be 
keynote speaker at an all-day North- 
ern California Executives Conference 
on Public Relations on October 5, in 
the St. Francis Hotel. 
• Conference is sponsored by the 
National Industrial Information Com- 
mittee of N.A.M., San Francisco 
Chamber, and business organizations. 

Charles E. Moore, Northern 
California Director of N. A.M., and 
Adrien J. Falk, Chamber Presi- 
dent, will act as presiding officers. 



Roll of Postwar 
Synthetics Suggested 
By S. F. Chamber 

Suggestions for role of synthetic 
after the war is contained in a decla- 
ration of policy enunciated by the 
San Francisco Chamber of Commerce 
Board of Directors in accepting the 
following recommendation cleared by 
the Foreign Trade Committee on the 
basis of studies made by its Sub-Com- 
mittee on Postwar Planning for For- 
eign Trade. 

• The policy bears on synthetic- 
rubber and all other synthetics: 

"Cut off from accustomed foreign 
sources of supply of the natural prod- 
ucts, much of our war industry activ- 
ity has been devoted to development 
of synthesized substitutes. 

"Believing that the develop- 
ment of synthetic products pro- 
motes the national welfare we 
recommend that production be 
continued in the postwar period 
provided that such production is 
not maintained through the im- 
position or increase of duties on 
the imported natural product. 

"Should the production of a syn- 
thetic product essential to military 
requirements of the United States be 
discontinued for economic reasons we 
recommend that a reasonable amount 
of plant capacity be maintained at 
government expense as a standby fa- 
cility to be put into production when, 
as and if needed for military require- 
ments. This will serve as a protection 
should the supply of the natural prod- 
uct ever be cut off again." 



Lundborg at Stockton 

Louis B. Lundborg, general man- 
ager, San Francisco Chamber, will 
speak before the Stockton R< itarj 
Club, Wednesday, October 4. 

His subject will be "The Bay 
Area Looks Ahead," a discussion 
of inter-city relations. 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Thursday, September 28, 1944 



California Onion Surplus is 
Cause for Bay Region Campaign 



WLB Announces Pay 
Policy for V-E Day 

The National War Labor Board 
has announced the following policy for 
V-E Day: 

"(1) Employers who close their 
shops on the day that cessation of 
hostilities with Germany is offi- 
cially announced may, without 
board approval, pay their em- 
ployees at straight time rates or 
earnings for hours not worked 
without being considered in viola- 
tion of the wage and salary stabil- 
ization law. 

"(2) The hours not worked on 
V-E Day for which such payment is 
permitted as noted in (1) above shall 
be included in computing whether or 
not premium overtime payments are 
due employees. 

"(3) In case of continuous around 
the clock operations involving two or 
more shifts the employees working on 
shifts other than the one during 
which the armistice announcement 
occurs may also, without board ap- 
proval, be dismissed and paid at 
straight time rates. In other words 
this permission to pay for hours not 
worked on V-E Day is effective for 
24 hours beginning with the time of 
first dismi ssal." 

CofC's Charge Bias 
In Meat Rate Case 

Stating that a proposed report by 
an Interstate Commerce Commission 
examiner in the westbound meat rates 
case was biased, Walter A. Rohde, 
Manager, Transportation Depart- 
ment, San Francisco Chamber of 
Commerce, acting also on behalf of 
the Oakland and Los Angeles Cham- 
bers, has filed exceptions to the report. 

• Position of the three Chambers 
is that the examiner did not give suffi- 
cient consideration to the effect re- 
duced meat rates from the Midwest 
would have on the meat packing and 
livestock industries of the Pacific 
Coast, nor to evidence that the com- 
plaining Midwest packers are shipping 
to the Pacific Coast in considerable 
volume under the existing rates, 
which the examiner found too high. 

• Other exceptionsto the report will 
also be filed by the railroads and live- 
stock interests. The matter will be 
argued orally before the Commission 
at a later date, though a decision is 
not expected for several months. 



With a surplus in California of 
900,000 fifty pound sacks of choice 
onions, residents of the Bay Region 
are urged to purchase their onions 
immediately and contribute to a cam- 
paign starting now and ending Octo- 
ber 7 to relieve California growers 
of excess stocks, according to John 
Pichett, chairman Agricultural Com- 
mittee, San Francisco Chamber of 
Commerce. 

This campaign has been 
launched on a national scale by 
the Office of Distribution, War 
Food Administration. The Cham- 
ber's Agricultural Committee is 
cooperating locally to stimulate 
consumer use of surplus Cali- 
fornia onions. 

• Cooperating with the Agricultural 
Committee locally are: California 
Chain Stores Association; Retail Gro- 
cers Association of San Francisco; 
Wholesale Fruit and Produce Dealers 
Association; and Retail Fruit Dealers 
Association. 



AAF Seeks Names of Aircraft 
Subcontractors and Suppliers 

The Army Air Forces are anxious to 
secure names of all local subcontrac- 
tors, sub subcontractors and other 
suppliers to the aircraft industry, par- 
ticularly those doing work for contrac- 
tors in other sections of the country. 

The information is vital to the 
AAF in planning for their own 
termination load, since lower tier 
subcontractors in the aircraft in- 
dustry usually are numerous and, 
consequently, difficult to reach. 
• Local aircraft contractors are 
requested to contact Capt. Robert L. 
Polk or Lt. Quillen L. Thorn at the 
San Francisco Area Office, Air Tech- 
nical Service Command, 593 Market 
Street, phone GArfield 4641. 



West Portal Lions Club Lunch 

Adrien J. Falk, president, San Fran- 
cisco Chamber of Commerce, will 
speak before the West Portal Lions 
Club at the Town House, 2623 Ocean 
Avenue, on Wednesday, October 4, at 
12:15, on "San Francisco at the Cross- 
roads." 

• Lions Clubs throughout the 
city are invited to attend the lunch- 
eon, which will be presided over by 
Fred A. Solarius, vice president, San 
Francisco Bank, and honorary chair- 
man of the West Portal Lions Club. 



Street System Policy 
Announced by C of C 

This is the first of a series of Traffic and Tran- 
sit policies approved by the San Francisco Cham- 
ber of Commerce on recommendation by its Street 
and Highway Committee. 

• Recommendation : That the rela- 
tive merits of the numerous possible 
individual projects for postwar de- 
velopment be determined by the vol- 
ume of traffic that each can serve and 
by their relation to the master plan 
for San Francisco. 

That priorities be established for 
improving thoroughfares serving the 
congested district and adjacent areas. 

• Statement: In normal times there J 
are more than one and one-quarter 
million personal movements in-and- 
out of this congested area daily. War 
conditions have greatly stimulated 
this movement. 

Although a number of construc- 
tive steps of a regulatory nature, 
such as one-way streets and pro- 
hibited parking, have been taken 
in this area and much more can 
be accomplished in that line, 
there are specific physical im- 
provements, such as widening, 
surfacing, and extensions, that 
are important and vital to a 
smoother flow of the traffic and 
should be made within the prac- 
tical limits of the money avail- 
able. 

Included in the possible east-west 
routes serving these areas are Pine 
Street, Bush Street, Bush Street Ex- 
tension, California Street, O'Farrell | 
Street, O'Farrell Street Extension, 
Anza Street, Turk Street, and Pacific 
Avenue. Included in the possible 
northerly-southerly routes are Mason 
Street, Leavenworth Street, Second 
Street, crossing over Channel Creek, 
lower Third Street, Bryant Street, and 
Guerrero Street. 

Most of these possible projects have : 
had some attention and consideration 
by responsible City authorities and 
have been designated as preferred or 
desirable improvements. 

The fact that daily, thousands 
of people from every section of 
the City are flowing in-and-out of 
the Central Business District and 
the contiguous wholesale and in- 
dustrial areas, and that they will I 
be benefited by these improve- 
ments, should neutralize any sug- 
gestion of sectionalism in these 
recommendations. 

The general pattern of the major 
thoroughfares involving large expen- 
ditures should be tied in to the master 
plan for San Francisco. A recapitula- 
tion of possible street and highway 
improvements in San Francisco de- 
(Continued on col. 2, page 4) 



Fhursday, September 28, 1944 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Freeway Move Approved by Highway Commission 



Mare Island Hospital 
Rehabilitation Program Told 

The program of the Naval Hospital 
it Mare Island for the physical and 
/ocational rehabilitation of sick and 
njured marine and naval personnel 
vas outlined recently at a meeting of 
;he Women's Auxiliary to the Cali- 
Ornia Medical Association by Capt. 
Henry H. Kessler. 

Taking up the problem speci- 
ically of men coming into the 
lospital's amputation center, 
Kessler outlined the task as one 
)f returning the injured as com- 
petent social units which required 
jhysical restoration and voca- 
:ional training. 

» Vocational guidance training of- 
ered at or supervised by the hospital 
s to give each man a skill to compen- 
sate for his disability. 

This prepares them to take their 
jlace in society as effective indi- 
viduals, "not as professional vet- 
irans," Kessler pointed out. 



Fox Talk at Stockton 

Stating that an unprecedented 
lumber of manufacturers are now 
tbnducting negotiations with a view 
o selection of sites for postwar proj- 
ects in the Bay Area, G. L. Fox, Man- 
iger, Industrial Department, San 
T rancisco Chamber of Commerce, 
itressed the timeliness of a regional 
viewpoint in a speech Monday night 
>efore the San Joaquin County Cham- 
)er of Commerce meeting in Stockton. 



Support Pledged for 
Federal Aid Road Act 
Amendment 

Support and assistance to expedite 
national legislation amending the Fed- 
eral Aid Road Act if the legislation is 
acceptable to California State High- 
way officials has been authorized by 
the Board of Directors in approving 
a policy recommendation by the 
Street and Highway Committee of 
the San Francisco Chamber. 

• Federal Aid Road Act amend- 
ment would authorize and allocate 
funds for a national postwar highway 
program. 

"Aware of the several changes 
which have occurred in this pro- 
posed legislation to date and that 
other changes may be made, it 
was the opinion of the Street and 
Highway Committee that the 
Chamber of Commerce might 
stabilize its position and avoid re- 
opening this issue by broadening 
the recommendation to cover the 
principle rather than any particu- 
lar bill," stated E. L. Turkington, 
chairman. 

• Latest bill introduced for this 
purpose is S. 2105, which provides for 
8650,000,000 per annum for three suc- 
cessive years. Ratios established in 
this bill are at 60 per cent Federal 
and 40 per cent State for three post- 
war years. It is reported that State 
officials are supporting the bill. 



INTERNATIONAL TRAINING PROGRAM 



A "good neighbor" program to 
rain men from other American re- 
jublics, in various trades, professions 
ind other occupations by enlisting 
he interest of United States business 
:oncerns is now being launched in 
lorthern California, according to G. 
^. Fox, manager, San Francisco 
Ihamber of Commerce Industrial 
Department. 

» This program has had the coop- 
eration of the Coordinator of Inter- 
\merican Affairs and is now being 
landled through International Train- 



ing Administration, Inc., Washington, 
D. C. 

Gustave E. Carlson, manager, 
Administration's Industrial De- 
partment, visited San Francisco 
recently to discuss the possibility 
of placing trainees in the Bay 
Area, and has supplied the Cham- 
ber's Industrial Department with 
lists of men available for practical 
on-the-job training in American 
industry. 

• Under the program, trainees are 
compensated by their employer and 
are also subjects of "Inter-American 
Trade Scholarships." 



Movement of the Bayshore Free- 
way to the west to permit full expan- 
sion of San Francisco Airport was 
finally approved in principle by the 
California State Highway Commis- 
sion last week, according to E. V. 
Mills, chairman, Bay Area Air Trans- 
port Planning Committee of the San 
Francisco Chamber of Commerce. 
• The Commission's approval was 
obtained after a conference and in- 
spection tour of the airport by Charles 
Purcell, chairman, State Highway 
Commission, and nine other commis- 
sioners from all over the state. Mayor 
Roger D. Lapham; Chief Admin- 
istrative Officer Thomas A. Brooks; 
Marshall Dill, president, Public Utili- 
ties Commission; and Utilities Man- 
ager E. G. Cahill represented the 
City, and Mills represented the Cham- 
ber's committee. 

"This removes the last obstacle in 
the way of developing San Francisco 
Airport into the major air terminal of 
the entire western part of the United 
States," Mills said. 

Over a year ago studies to de- 
termine ways and means to en- 
courage the proper development 
of both the San Francisco Airport 
and Bayshore Freeway were un- 
dertaken jointly by the Cham- 
ber's Street and Highway Com- 
mittee and Air Transport Plan- 
ning Committee. 

As the result of many meetings and 
conferences the Chamber Board ap- 
proved a joint Street and Highway 
and Air Transport Planning Commit- 
tee recommendation urging realign- 
ment of the highway to permit maxi- 
mum development of both the airport 
and freeway. 

The Chamber then brought City 
officials and the State Highway 
Department representatives to- 
gether at a luncheon last October 
to launch negotiations for obtain- 
ing approval from the Commis- 
sion to move the highway. 



Richmond Gets $50,000 
for Industry Publicity 

At least $50,000 is to be spent by 
the Richmond Chamber of Commerce 
in the near future as a means of pub- 
licizing the city's industrial possibili- 
ties, according to action recently taken 
by the Richmond City Council which 
has donated 825,000 for that purpose. 
This is to be matched by a like amount 
raised from private sources. 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Thursday, September 28, 1944 



FOREIGN TRADE TIPS 



The Chamber cannot guarantee any firm or 
individual mentioned in TRADE TIPS. It is 
suggested the usual investigation be made in 
each instance. For details call World Trade 
Department, EXbrook 451 1 , and refer to the 
Trade Tip's number. 

3473 PLASTIC MATERIALS— Enrique Gross. 

Calle Tucuman 141, Buenos Aires, Argentina, wishes to 
contact manufacturers and exporters of plastic ma- 
terials and general merchandise. 

3474 FOODSTUFFS TO THE NEAR EAST— Tea- 
Roos. Gilead Road. Jalpioth. Jerusalem. Palestine, is 
anxious to get foodstuffs agency for Palestine. Egypt 
and Syria. 

3475 TRADE WITH IRAN— Joussef Golch.ihyan 
Mul'rad Timtrhe Sadraazam, Tehran. Iran, seeks con- 
nations with San Francisco manufacturers o! great 
variety of products, list of which is available at the 
World Trade Department. 

3476 EXPORTATION TO MEXICO— Arturo Val- 
( ].->vin..-s <" !.■• ■;••■■> ''"!iIm - ,:,s ' -ii.M.1 .■■■-',! ■ ,1 ■!-■ ■■ 
Mexico, wants to contact exporters of photographic 
articles. plastic materials and paper. 

3477 TRADE WITH GREECE— A C. Kazuntzi* 
& N. L. Chrvssanthnpuiilus. Alexandria. Greek Naval 
Mail, want to get in touch with American inanuia. - 
turers of tinned foodstuffs, chemicals and pharma- 
ceutical products, plastics, hosiery, etc. 

3478 GENERAL MERCHANDISE— Miguel Angel 
Martinez Barranco. Morelos 8,5. Mexico D.b , M'-xico, 
seeks representation of manufacturers of general mer- 

3479 REPRESENTATION IN LATIN AMERICA— 

M T. Montgomery. 1461 Alice Street. Oakland Cali- 
fornia, would like to contact manufacturers interested 
in representation in Latin America. 

3480 BUSINESS WITH PUERTO RICO— Puerto 

Rico Trading Corporation. Calle Tetuan 47. Apariadu 
1417-7, San Juan. Puerto Ricn, desires connect !■ .n- with 
manufacturers and exporters of canned goods, hard- 
materials, etc.. for their representa- 



tion in that Island. 

3481 PRODUCTS TO PERU— Atlas Company S.A.. 
Jiron Lampa 1043. Oficina 1. Lima. Peru, is anxious to 
buy a great variety of products, list of which is available 
at the World Trade Department. 

3482 CARGO VESSEL— Manuel Mier Gonzales, 
Avenido Madera 766 Oriente, Morelos, Michoacan, 
Mexico wislu's relations with firms who are in a position 
to sell him a cargo vessel of 60 to 100 tun-, .-quipped 
with mechanic locomotive, especially diesel motors. 

3483 FOODSTUFFS— Fernando Marquez. 3 Depo- 
sits Santa Marina. Apartado postal S5t>, San Juan, 
Puerto Ricn, is interested in connections with food- 
stuffs packers and manufacturers lor their representa- 
tion. Bank references supplied. 

3484 BUSINESS IN SPAIN— Villanueva y Cia. 
Avenida Jose Antonio 635, Barcelona, Spain, want to 
contact American manufacturers of vari,.u^ pn.duus 
described in a list available at the World Trade De- 
partment office. 

3485 REPRESENTATION IN MEXICO— Don 
Vasquez.Chopob. Apartamento 25, Mexico lj I- , wishes 
to represent American manufacturers in Mexico City. 

3486 IMPORTATION FROM PORTUGAL— J. 
Pereira, 17 70 Lombard Street, San Francisco, Cali- 
fornia, would like to get in contact with Unas imciv-ted 
in the importation from Portugal, of cuttlefish bone 
and cork. 

3487 HARDWARE AND WINE— Jose G Larin, 
Colonia Flor Blanca, San Salvador, El Salvador. Cen- 
tral America, is interested in representing exporters of 
hardware, leather products and wine. 

3488 DRIED BANANAS— West Indies Combine- 
agencies. P. O. Box All 2. Port-Au-Pnnce. Haiti. 
manufacturers of dried bananas, would like to get in 
touch with companies interested in importing this 
product. 

3489 ARGENTINE PRODUCTS— La Araucana 
S.A. Financiera Inmobiliana Comercial. Calle Morida 
440, Buenos Aires, Argentina, desires to export ranted 
wool for yarn, leather products, onyx articles for desks 
and gift articles, 

SPECIAL NOTICE: The Brazilian Government 
Trade Bureau, 551 Fifth Avenue. New York 17, N. Y-. 
has supplied a Brazilian Bulletin in Portuguese lan- 
guage, which contains trad-- opportunities and other 
valuable trade information. Those interested may see 
the bulletin by calling at the World Trade Department 



Published weekly at 333 Pine St., San Fran 


isco. 


Zone 4, County of San Francisco. California 




Williams, Editor. Telephone EXbrook 4511. 


Sub- 


scription. Fifty Cents a Year (Included in A 


inual 


Dues). Entered as Second Class matter Apr 




1944, at the Post Office at San Francisco, 


Cali- 


fornia, under the act of March 3, 1870. 





Appraiser's Stores 
Building Dedicated 

Dedication ceremonies for the new 
Appraiser's Stores Building were held 
Monday, September 25, in the build- 
ing's United States Customs Court 
room. 

This event marked the opening 
of the Customs Court and other 
official activities in the new 16- 
story, five million dollar structure, 
whose construction has been a 
project of the San Francisco 
Chamber of Commerce since 1923. 

• Representing the Chamber was 
William L. Montgomery, who re- 
viewed the history of the project and 
the role played by San Francisco in 
bringing it to completion. 

• Participating in the ceremony 
were: Samuel D. Specter, Special U. 
S. Attorney; Frank L. Lawrence and 
Walter I. Carpeneti, customs attor- 
neys; George Vice, United States 
Marshal ; Lee Quan, Chinese Chamber 
of Commerce; Ray Robinson, Cus- 
toms Brokers; Charles J. Evans, re- 
tired, and Paul H. Watson, United 
States Appraisers; Hon. Thomas J. 
Walker, Judge U. S. Customs Court; 
and Hon. Ernest Van Fossan, Judge, 
U. S. Tax Court. 



Street System Policy Announced 

(Continued from Page 2) 

veloped jointly by the Department of 
Public Works and the City Planning 
Commission reveals possible projects 
amounting to about 8185,000,000. Of 
these, some 57 projects have been 
grouped in the preferred class and are 
estimated to cost some S22,O0O,OOO. 
Indicated as desirable are 26 projects 
estimated to cost §52,000,000, and 
there are 10 projects estimated to cost 
nearly $9,000,000 indicated as defer- 
rable. In addition, there are 7 free- 
ways representing a total cost of 
$78,000,000 listed as preferred. 



The San Francisco Chamber of Commerce 

333 Pina Street, San Francisco 4 
EXbrook 4311 



DOMESTICTRADETIPS 



A digest of correspondence received from 
those desiring, or offering, lines of merchandise 
for representation. They are listed here as a 
service without necessarily bearing endorse- 
ment by the Chamber. For further details, 
contact the Domestic Trade Department, 
EXbrook 4511, Ext. 56. 

D-6057— G. LA MARCA, LA MARCA SALES 
COMPANY, 45 Beverly Street. Boston. 14. Massachu- 
setts, wishes to represent in the New England States, 
producers of wines, canned fruit, olive oil, and dried 

D_ 60 58— ROLAND H. FITZ. 2708 North 48th 
Street, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, interested in distributing 
for local manufacturers in Wisconsin and upper Michi- 
gan with Milwaukee as headquarters. 

D-6059— EDWARD J. PICONE, 29 Amsterdam 
Avenue. Menands. New York, desires to contact manu- 
facturer or distributor for purpose of representing him 
in New England. 

D-6060— MAURICE D. KANSKY. 41 Wedgewood 
Road, West Newton, 65, Massachusetts, interested in 
any line that has merit and can be sold in New England. 
Ext lusive agency wanted. 

D-6061— J- S. WILLIAMS. AUTOMATIC CON- 



pressure control;, want individual familiar with kindred 
lines to represent them exclusively in this area. 

D-6062— T. BESSING. 1114 West 18th Street, Los 
Angeles 15, California, wishes sales right and selling 
privileges for manufacturing firms on a commission 

D-6063— C. C. SPIEGELHALTER, 4041 Magnolia 
Avenue. St. Louis. Missouri, wishes to represent San. 
Francisco firms in the Saint Louis Area. Financial and i 
other references available. 



CofC Representatives at 
Supervisors' Meeting 

Attending the Board of Super- 
visors meeting, Monday, Sep- 
tember 25, were: 

Alfred H. Meyer, member, 
San Francisco Chamber Board. 

Lloyd E. Graybiel, member, 
Chamber's Municipal Affairs 
committee. 



RADIO 



• Monday, October 2, 12:45-1:00 
p.m. KSFO — War of Enterprise, 
dramatization of American Industry 
at war. 




SuaweM. 



PUBLISHED BY THE 

SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 



Volume 



Thursday, October 5, 1944 



Number 27 



Business Activity Edition 



humb Nail Sketch 

The Research Department 

San Francisco Chamber 

of Commerce 

San Francisco Bay Area is now 
down to have the largest wartime 
opulation increase among the 
sn Congested Production Areas 
l the nation, according to a re- 
mt release of the Bureau of the 
ensus. 

Here are the increases reported be- 
ireen April 1, 1940, and April 1, 1944: 

San Francisco Bay Area 582,809 

Los Angeles Area 5 1 8.334 

San Diego Area 319,823 

Hampton Roads Area 312,643 

Puget Sound Area 250 46' 

Detroit-Willow Run Area ,. .212.457 
Portland-Vancouver Area . . 168,342 

Mobile Area 96,307 

Charleston (S.C.) Area 69^317 

Muskegon Area 13,578 

Complete resident population 

San Francisco, including civilian 
id military, as of April 1, 1944. just 
leased by the Bureau of the Census. 

786.590 which tends to confirm 
is Chamber's original estimate, 
milarly, Oakland has 372.921, and 
irkeley 103,315. 

Cumulative war contracts and 
oject orders for the Bav Area 
rough the Mav-June 'period 
lounted to S4, 514,522, 000. Of this, 
pply contracts cumulative through 
ne amounted to $3,191,397,000 
d included S159, 224.000 in new 
tracts for the month, of which 
19,651.000 were for ships, $15,- 
7,000 for ordnance, and $26,759,000 
identified. Facility contracts cumu- 
ive through Mav amounted to 
58.427,000 and included $371,687,- 
3 for industry, and S86, 740,000 for 
litary. 
Bay Area financial transactions 

August of 52,084,116,000 were up 

per cent compared to last August 



and carried the 8 months' cumulative 
to SI 6,696,840,000, or 13.8 per cent 
above the similar period last vear. 

• Carloadings in the San Francisco- 
Oakland switching limits made a new 
high of 74,069 during August and car- 
ried the cumulative for the 8 months 
to 542,074, or 0.4 per cent above the 
same period last year. 

• Manufacturing industries in the 
San Francisco Industrial Area em- 
ployed 258, 700 wage earners in August 
compared to 252,000 in July 'and 
299, 6(10 last August. The durable 
group with 189.200 workers reported 
3,800 fewer than in the preceding 
month, but the non-durable group 
with 69,500 workers reported an in- 
crease of 9,500 over the previous 
month. 

This latter increase was due pri- 
marily to the seasonal trend in 
the canning and packing industry. 

• August payrolls in the manu- 
facturing industries were off 12.3 per 
cent compared to last August, but 
the 8 months' average was practically 
identical to the same period last year. 

• Non-manufacturing payrolls 
Payrolls in the non-manufacturing in- 
dustries for both August and "" the 
8 months' cumulative were substan- 



SAN FRANCISCO 

BUSINESS ACTIVITY 

UNADJUSTED INDEX 1935-19 




tially above August a year ago, with 
the hotel group showing the foremost 
gains. 

• Average weekly earnings in the 
manufacturing industries amounted 
to S57.42 in August compared to 
S58.73 in July and S56.16 last August. 

• Average hours worked per week 
amounted to 44 in August. 44.2 in 
July, and 44.9 last August. Average 
hourly earnings amounted to SI. 304 
in August. SI. 328 in July, and SI. 252 
in August a year ago. 

• Bay Region retail sales of some 
twenty department stores in August 
surpassed August a vear ago by 21 
per cent, with the 8 months' cumula- 
tive up 9 per cent, while reports from 
188 stores in the Twelfth Federal 
Reserve District revealed an increase 
of 15 per cent and 8 per cent respec- 
tively. August sales compared to 
August last year in San Francisco 
were up 22 per cent ; Oakland-Berke- 
ley. 16 per cent; San Jose, 22 per 
cent ; Santa Rosa, 26 per cent ; Vallejo- 
Xapa. 20 per cent: Sacramento. 15 
per cent ; Stockton , 4 per cent ; Fresno, 
28 per cent: and Central Valley, 15 
per cent. 

• Trade at wholesale on the Pacific 
1 " i-t during the first 7 months was 
up 5 per cent above the same period 
last year. Automotive supplies led 
with an increase of 26 per cent, fol- 
lowed by groceries and foods, and 
meat and meat products. 

• General business activity in San 
Francisco during August made a 
slight seasonal gain. Our index at 
181.7 was 2.1 per cent above July and 
11.1 per cent above last August. The 
8 months' average of 180.0 was 13 per 
cent above the 8 months of last year. 

With the general trend still up- 
ward, there is no indication that 
business activity in this area has 

(Continued on Page 4) 



ee Inside for Chamber Stand on Ballot Measures 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Thursday, October 5, 1944 



Oakland "Work Pile" 
Now Totals $25,000,000 

A total of §25,000,000 has been ear- 
marked by four of 1 03 commercial and 
industrial groups in Oakland partici- 
pating in the current city-wide Work 
Pile" Survey of the Oakland Chamber 
of Commerce and Oakland Postwar 
Planning Committee. 
• Topping the list so far is the 
Apartment House Association of Ala- 
meda County whose Oakland mem- 
bers state that the group has $15,- 
900,000 for postwar expenditure. 

Representatives of seven major 
Oakland department stores re- 
ported that they plan $3,500,000 
worth of expenditures. 



MacDonald to Head 
Aviation^Department 
for Chamber 

A vigorous program to make the 
San Francisco Bay Area the passenger 
and freight air terminal of the West 
was announced last Tuesday by Gen- 
eral Manager Louis B. Lundborg in 
disclosing formation of a new Aviation 
Department of the San Francisco 
Chamber with Kenneth R. MacDon- 
ald as manager. 

MacDonald has been active dur- 
ing the last year and a half in 
committee coordination work for 
the Aircraft War Production 
Council, Inc., at Los Angeles. 
• The new Aviation Department 
will coordinate activities of the Bay 
Area Aviation Committee. 



Gunnison, Cof C Pacific 
Trade Representative 

Royal Arch Gunnison has been ap- 
pointed special trade development 
representative to the Pacific Area for 
the San Francisco Chamber according 
to an announcement by Chamber 
President Adrien J. Falk. 

Gunnison is an accredited war cor- 
respondent at present, through his 
activities as Far East Editor of Col- 
lier's magazine and commentator, 
Mutual Broadcasting System. 
• As Chamber representative, he 
will carry the Chamber's plans for 
postwar foreign trade to businessmen 
in the Pacific countries, and obtain 
from them suggestions for postwar 
foreign trade development. 



Montgomery Leaves 
C of C, Directs China- 
America Council Here 

Appointment of William L. Mont- 
gomery as managing director of the 
China-America Council of Commerce 
and Industry, Inc., was announced 
Tuesday by Harry D. Collier, presi- 
dent of the Standard Oil Company of 
California and Chairman of the Coun- 
cil's San Francisco Regional Board. 

For the last ten years, Mont- 
gomery has been manager of the 
San Francisco Chamber's World 
Trade Department. 

Louis B. Lundborg, general man- 
ager of the Chamber, who joined in 
the announcement, commended the 
China-America Council on their plans 
and on their selection of Montgomery. 
• The Council — Officially recog- 
nized and endorsed by the govern- 
ments of the two countries, the China- 
America Council is expected to play 
a leading role in re-establishment of 
postwar trade in the Pacific. 



V-E Day Citizens 
Committee Appointed 

Appointment of a Citizens' Com- 
mittee to make arrangements for 
proper observance of the termination 
of hostilities in Europe (V-E Day) 
was announced last week by Mayor 
Roger D. Lapham. 
• At a preliminary meeting called 
Tuesday, September 26, by Super- 
visor John J. Sullivan, Honorary 
Chairman, an Executive Committee 
was set up with Ted Huggins as 
chairman. Huggins is chairman of the 
Victory Day Committee of the San 
Francisco Chamber of Commerce. 

Other members of the Cham- 
ber's committee appointed to the 
Executive Committee are: Major 
General Walter C. Sweeney; Wil- 
liam H. Moulthrop; John Brun- 
ton; and David P. Street. 



Area Unity Conference 

Progress in unity and correlated 
action on a Bay regional scale by 
chambers of commerce and other pro- 
motional organizations was achieved 
at a meeting in San Francisco last 
week presided over by Adrien J. Falk, 
president, San Francisco Chamber. 
• Industrial Map — In addition to 
general cooperation through setting 
up of a special Bay Area committee, 
the meeting established ways and 
means of revising and keeping up-to- 
date a Bay Area industrial map. 



Chamber Will Work 
for Uniform Conversion 
Throughout Nation 

The San Francisco Chamber win 
take all possible steps to have pro! 
duction and material controls mis- 
pended or lifted by the Federal Gov! 
ernment on a uniform national basis! 
according to a resolution just adopted 
by the Board of Directors. 

This action was taken because its 
is understood that consideration 
is being given by Washington} 
authorities to the possibility on 
lifting controls throughout the 
United States except the Pacific 
Coast. 

Because of the tremendous war 
contributions being made by the Pa4 
cific Coast, requiring constantly in- 
creasing manpower; because of thl 
effect conversion policies applied on a 
selected basis would have on out-ma 
gration of labor; and because it is th» 
Chamber's belief that it would com 
tribute to the overall national econl 
omy to allow some of the Pacifili 
Coast plants to convert to civiliani 
production, the Chamber will vigo» 
ously support a conversion plan where* 
by Washington policies are appliei 
uniformly throughout the nation. I 



University of San Francisco] 
Starts Far Eastern Program j 

Tuesday, October 10, is the openin|| 
date for a University of San Francisclj 
Program of Far Eastern Affairs, de- 
signed to do the immediate job of 
training Americans for operations in 
China, Japan, Malaysia and the Pa« 
cific Islands. 

According to University Presidenw 
William J. Dunne, the bulk of thij 
candidates for the program are beirai 
recruited from American firms havifllj 
offices and plants in the Orient an|d 
those planning to participate in pi 
war work there. 



Mineral Resources Survey 

Under mandate from the recenli 
Special Session of the Legislature, th»i 
California State Division of Mine}' 
has undertaken a survey of the eca' 
nomic position of the state's mineral 
resources to determine to what extent 
they may provide postwar emplovl 
ment, according to a statement mas 
to the Chamber's Mining Committer' 
by Walter W. Bradley, State Mini, 
eralogisl. 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



STATE BALLOT MEASURES 

SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE RECOMMENDATIONS 



* 1 Vote Yes — Veterans Bond Act of 1943. 

This act will be of valuable aid to the veterans in establishing 
themselves after the war. The act is fundamentally sound and 
planned on a self-liquidating basis. 

|2 Vote Yes — Taxation, Veterans Exemption. As- 
sembly Constitutional Amendment No. 1. 

The same rights afforded the veterans of World War I, namely 
the $1000 tax exemption, will be extended to those of World War II. 

#3 Vote Yes— Constitutional Officers, Compensa- 
tion. Senate Constitutional Amendment No. 29. 

The salaries of the Lieutenant Governor, Secretary of State, 
State Controller, Treasurer, and Superintendent of Public Instruc- 
tion were frozen into the Constitution in 1908 on the basis of their 
duties at that time. Their responsibilities have increased in keeping 
with the State's growth and the salaries are inadequate both in terms 
of the job and present conditions. Proposal returns control to the 
Legislature where it should be. 

j 4 Vote No — Taxation Exemption of Religious, 
Hospital, and Charitable Organizations. Assembly 
Constitutional Amendment No. 17. 

In developing a recommendation to the Board on this measure, 
a special meeting of the Chamber's Tax Committee was held at which 
a proponent was present. 

While sympathetic with the objective that certain types of 
non-profit charitable institutions should be exempt, the Chamber is 
of the opinion that this measure is too broadly drawn. For instance: 

a. It makes eligible for exemption a broad field of "non-profit" 
enterprises which do or could charge the public for all or a part of 
their services. 

b. In relation to real property used solely and exclusively for 
religious purposes, the proposal is superfluous because such property 
is presently exempted. 

c. It makes eligible for exemption property still to be acquired 
by such non-profit enterprises, any of which could be patterned to 
become eligible under the law. 

d. The actual status of exemption, which is left to the later de- 
termination of the Legislature, might by legislative act embrace 
many institutions not worthy to secure its benefits. Exemptions 
should be clearly defined in the Constitution, and not left to the 
political action of a legislature. 

e. Some non-profit enterprises could claim that status through 
such devices as paying increased compensation to those administer- 
ing them. 

# 5 Vote Yes— Public Officers and Employees, Rein- 
statement After Military Service. Senate Consti- 
tutional Amendment No. 10. 

This is a commendable corrective measure solely to establish 
the right of certain public officers and employees to return to their 
former positions from military service. 

§6 Vote No— Legislature, Sessions, Budget. Senate 
Constitutional Amendment No. 25. 

This measure would establish annual sessions of the Legislature 
in contrast to the present biennial. The Chamber recommends oppo- 
sition to it because: 

1. It allows insufficient time for the tax paying public to give 
proper examination to the budget by shortening the reviewal period 
from the present three or four months to six weeks or less. 

2. It arbitrarily sets the period of sessions at sixty days as 
against the present indeterminate period. This would result in hasty 
consideration of legislation and put a premium on the use of parlia- 
mentary tactics. 

#7 Vote Yes — Legislature, Expenses of Members. 
Assembly Constitutional Amendment No. 2. 

It is entirely proper that legislators whose compensation for 
their services is fixed and limited by the Constitution should be re- 
imbursed for their expenses necessarily incurred while attending 
regular, special and extraordinary sessions. Proposal limits reim- 
bursement to the amount now allowed other elected State officials. 



f 8 Vote No — Validation Tax Deeds. Senate Consti- 
tutional Amendment No. 21. 

The proponents of this measure are sincere in their desire to 
improve the quality of California tax deeds. The present situation 
with respect to tax deeds in California is unsatisfactory. The pro- 
ponents believe the measure to be a good method to iron out techni- 
calities in the present statute which interfere with the State's grant- 
ing a clear title to buyers of tax deeded property. 

However, certain serious objections have been raised to the pro- 
posed method. The adoption of a constitutional amendment would 
possibly tie the hands of the Legislature with respect to alternative 
solutions to the problem and it seems inadvisable to attempt lo 
destroy the last vestige of right which certain persons may now 
possess with respect to property ownership. It is proposed to do by 
this constitutional amendment that which could be done as well and 
perhaps better by legislative enactment. If a legislative act should 
result in any injustice it could be more quickly and more easily 
amended than a new section added to our Constitution. Attention 
is particularly called to the fact that by reason of the large number 
of special districts in California it is not uncommon for taxpayers 
who control their property with the greatest of care to find after a 
lapse of many years that they have overlooked and failed to pay one 
installment of a special district tax, particularly in a case where I he 
special district tax is not collected by the county tax collector. 

§ 9 Vote No — Funds for Elementary Schools. Initia- 
tive Constitutional Amendment. 

A proponent of this measure presented an affirmative argument 
before Tax Committee before recommendation to the Board was 
made. 

This initiative measure, submitted without discussion by either 
house of our Legislature, would increase the State's constitutional 
fixed charge for the support of elementary schools from $60 to $80 
annually per pupil in average daily attendance, entailing an increase 
in the State budget of about $28 millions per biennium on the basis 
of present attendance. Proponents make the following claims: 

a. Maintenance of high educational standards requires addi- 
tional funds primarily for higher pay to elementary school teachers, 
now paid somewhat less than high school teachers and those in other 
professions. It is contended better pay will encourage present 
teachers to remain and attract young persons to the profession. 

b. It is proposed that the State provide the needed funds, 
guaranteed thru a constitutional grant. Claim is made that funds, 
without burden to the taxpayers, are available from the present 
general fund cash surplus. 

In its consideration of these claims, the Committee reasoned as 
follows: 

The general fund surplus bears no relation to the normal con- 
tinuing productivity of the State's revenue svstem. On June 30, 
1944, that surplus was $226,558,3.38, of which '$177,527,007 is ear- 
marked, leaving $40,028,331. 

While this fund will increase while the war goes on, its existence 
and present State income are not representative of normal condi- 
tions. No permanent expenditure can justly be related to the present 
flow of revenue into the State treasury. War brought increased 
revenue and decreased expenditure. 

During the ten-year period, 1931-1940, the State could not 
live within its revenue, a $31 million surplus becoming an $82 million 
deficit. Concurrently, new revenue sources were tapped: Motor 
Transportation, Beverage, Liquor, Sales, Use, Personal income, 
Private Car, Automobile In Lieu, and Gift taxes. Inheritance and 
Bank and Corporation Franchise tax rates were increased. Despite 
this, the State operated in the red until February 1942. 

At the last record, average teacher salary in California was third 
highest in the nation, being $2373 in 1940-41. Present war time 
bonuses raise the amount considerably; for instance, the annual 
bonus in San Francisco is S420, Oakland $360, Long Beach $211. and 
varying from $100 to $420 throughout the State. 

If purely for the sake of discussion, it is granted teachers should 
receive higher salaries, the proposal in this measure is not desirable. 
As evidenced above, there is ample present legal provision for school 
districts to increase teachers' salaries. Some 100 districts are too 
poor to do so without State aid, a shortage remedied for this bi- 
ennium by the Legislature. It has been represented to teachers' 
representatives, and admitted by them, that this condition could be 



SEE OTHER SIDE OF PAGE FOR STAND ON MUNICIPAL BALLOT MEASURES 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



# 9 Funds for Elementary Schools — Continued 

equitably met by a State equalization fund. A bill providing for it 
has never been presented. 

The Legislature, through various measures, has recently added 
to the State's fixed charges by an amount of $73 millions to possibly 
$90 millions per biennium. Proposal No. 9 would add $28 millions 
more and raise the fixed charge portion of the State budget to about 
7S per cent, thus leaving only 22 per cent under direct control of the 
Legislature. This in face of the fact that in the ten years prior to the 
war, the State was unable to operate within its income. 

1 10 Vote Yes — Compensation of Officers, Increase 
during Term. Senate Constitutional Amendment 

No. 1. 

This is a war time measure only, intended, for the duration, to 
help retain elected officials in some counties on the job instead of 
seeking higher paying positions. 

#11 Vote No— Retirement Payments, Gross Income 
Tax. Initiative Constitutional Amendment. 

This proposal is a pension plan. It would pay $60 per month to 
non-working California citizens over 60 years of age. To finance it, 
there would be imposed a 3 per cent gross transaction tax which, if 
necessary, the Board of Equalization could raise to 5 per cent. 



In brief, it is opposed for the following reasons: 

a. It would pension all eligible persons without regard to needs. 

b. Social Security established the premise of contribution by 
prospective recipients — the building of a retirement fund. This pro- 
posal taxes 90 per cent of the people for the benefit of 10 per cent. 

c. The financing tax is a multiple tax levied on all transactions 
rising in total impost with each. 

d. li would be an awesome burden on business and the economy 
of this State. Businesses normally operating on a small margin 
probably could not continue. This State would cease to be a fertile 
field for investment for business purposes. 

"12 Vote No— Right of Employment. Initiative 
Constitutional Amendment. 

On April 5, 1944, when petitions were being circulated to qualify 
the "Right to Work" initiative measure for the November ballot, the 
Board of Directors went on record in opposition to the proposal. 

The Board has re-examined this measure-in the light of its having 
qualified for a place on the November ballot as Proposition No. 12, 
and reaffirmed its position, with this statement: 

"In our opinion, this issue will cause dissension between in- 
dustry and labor at a time when it is vital to unite for the undeviating 
prosecution of the war and the maintenance of essential production. 
Therefore, the Board of Directors unanimously opposes this initia- 
tive measure." 



MUNICIPAL BA 

SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF 

#26 Vote Yes— Sewer Bonds. 

Proposition No. 26 will provide for the authorization of $12,- 
000,000 in general obligation bonds for the construction of new 
sewers, sewer replacement, sewage treatment works and sewage 
pumping stations in San Francisco. For many years the annual 
budgets failed to provide sufficient funds for sewer construction and 
reconstruction. The growth of the bay pollution problem, as the 
population has increased, has created a situation which can only be 
solved with continued extension of the sewage treatment program. 
Many of the city's sewers are inadequate for the present population, 
or are over a half a century old and difficult to keep in repair. The 
city also is faced with the necessity to provide for a greater popula- 
tion in areas not now adequately served by main sewers. These con- 
ditions make approval of this bond issue imperative for the postwar 
period. The proposed $12,000,000 bond issue represents approxi- 
mately 50 per cent of the long-term program planned for the next 
two decades. 

#27 Vote Yes— Juvenile Court Building Bonds. 

Proposition No. 27 will provide for New Juvenile Court Build- 
ing, based on the petition to Mayor Roger D. Lapham executed by 
the mayor's committee of 35 members. The committee investigating 
conditions of the premises and facilities of the Juvenile Court and 
Detention Home and finding inadequate and outmoded facilities for 
the present needs of the children of San Francisco coming within the 
jurisdiction of the Court, recommended that adequate, modern, and 
beneficial facilities be made available for the care, custody, main- 
tenance, rehabilitation, and welfare of such children, and the erec- 
tion of a building at a cost not to exceed $1,250,000 to be paid for 
out of short term bonds. 

#28 Vote Yes — Pensions of Retired Persons. 

The provisions of section 163 of the charter provide for deduc- 
tions from pensions of retired city and county employees, when such 
persons are employed in private enterprise. This provision shall be 
set aside for the period of the existing war between the United States 
and the axis powers and for six months thereafter, in order to pro- 
vide additional manpower available in this area and in order to 
assist the war effort. 

1 29 Vote Yes — Superintendent of Schools. 

This proposition amends section 136 of the charter by allowing 
the superintendent of schools the right to appoint a confidential 
secretary outside of civil service provisions of the charter. As all 
non-teaching employees of the school department are under civil 
service, it was believed that the request of the superintendent should 
be granted. 

#30 Vote Yes — Steinhart Aquarium. 

This proposition amends section 52 and extends civil service 
provisions to cover all positions in the Steinhart Aquarium, exclusive 
of director, secretary of the board of directors, curators, and other 
scientific and professional persons, and part-time positions for which 
a compensation of less than $80 a month is provided. The incum- 
bents of these positions who have held their positions for one year 
prior to the effective date of this amendment, will be "blanketed in" 
under civil service. This measure is in line with former policies taken 
in connection with extending civil service to employees of the public 
library and the park department, and similar situations in the past, 
and will provide similar civil service protection, salaries, and retire- 

* Rebrints of these bases are available on reauest at San Franc 



LLOT MEASURES 

COMMERCE RECOMMENDATIONS 

ment benefits to a small group of employees in the park, to that 
enjoyed by other employees in the park who are under civil service, 
now. 

#31 Vote Yes — Recreation Department. 

An amendment of a charter amendment voted in 1942 wherein 
the terms of the commissioners was left indefinite, which will be 
corrected by this measure, providing a definite four-year term. This 
is merely a correction to restore w r hat existed prior to the amend- 
ment of 1942, which inadvertently omitted the proper language. 

#32 Vote Yes — Employees in Offices of City Attor- 
ney and Public Defender, except Attorneys, under 
Civil Service. 

A new section will be added to the charter that will extend civil 
service provisions to all employees in the office of the city attorney 
and public defender and will "blanket-in" the employees, exclusive 
of attorneys, who have held their respective positions for one year 
preceding the effective date of the amendment. The measure is in 
line with the long-range policies of the extension of civil service to 
the majority of positions in the city's service and is in line with 
similar measures in the past, such as the measures providing civil 
service to park and public library employees and Proposition No. 
30 on this ballot. 

§ 33 Vote Yes — Reinstatement of and Leaves of Ab- 
sence for members of American Red Cross. 

This measure would add a new section to the charter and pro- 
vide for the reinstatement of employees of the city who have re- 
signed to enter service in the American Red Cross, as a social service 
worker, field director, or assistant field director, during the present 
war. It will provide that employees shall be granted leaves of absence 
during the existing war, in order to serve with the Red Cross in the 
positions specified in the foregoing. Approximately a dozen em- 
ployees, almost entirely from the public welfare department's social 
service worker group, are affected by this amendment, which is an 
extension of the war leaves and military leaves, provided by section 
153 of the charter. 

#34 Vote Yes— Denning Retirement Provisions- 
Police Department. 

This measure would add a new section to the charter and will 
grant increased pension privileges to members of the police depart- 
ment. The principal changes involve reduction of the mandatory 
retirement age from 70 to 65 years and will provide for optional 
retirement after 30 years of service, or a minimum of 25 years of ' 
service at age 55. The measure also reduces the contributions by 
members from one-half to one-third of the annual cost to maintain 
the system. Proposition No. 34, although it doubles the cost in the 1 
first year, will decrease, according to the actuarial report of the city 
retirement board, as the older men now in the department retire. 
This measure is the result of several years of cooperation between 
the San Francisco Municipal Conference and the Police Officers' 
Association and incorporates the basic principles set up as the result 
of these discussions. This measure is a compromise, which is fair 
both to the taxpaying public and to the members of the police de- 
partment, granting the latter all of the changes to which they con- 
ceivably could be entitled to, and should provide a permanent set- 
tlement of this problem. 

i Chamber of Commerce offices. 333 Pine St. EXbrook 45 J J 



Thursday, October 5, 1944 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



SURVEY OF BUSINESS CONDITIONS 
IN SAN FRANCISCO 



BRANCH OF ACTIVITY 



Residential. Xew 
Single-family Dwellings. New 

Non-residential, Xew 

Additions. Alterations & Repair 
Installations 



Mortgages & Deeds of Trust. 
Releases 



FINANCE 

Bank Debits... 
Bank Cle.irmc- 
Postal Receipts 



i Stock Exchange 



EMPLOYMENT & PAYROLLS— Bay Area (5 Co.'s) (a) 

Employment (manufacturing) (index) 

Payrolls (manufacturing) (index! 

. (payroll) 

Wholesale Trade (payroll) 

Retail Trade. ............ (payroll) 

Hotels (payroll) 

PLACEMENTS IN SAN FRANCISCO— U. S. E. S. 



TRANSPORTATION 

Carloads. . . 

San Francisco Airport Traffic 

Express Shipments — Rail . 

Air. 
Air Mail Loaded 



(no. passengers) 



Indus. & Com'l Ca 
Water Consumers 
Tourist & Settler Inqu 



DAIRY RECEIPTS, FRUITS & VEGETABLES 

Butter (pounds) 

Cheese (pounds) 

Eggs ..(cases) 

Poultry, Dressed (pounds) 

Fruits & Vegetables (carlots) 

LIVESTOCK SLAUGHTER (b) . (total number) 

Cattle (number) 

Calves (number) 

Sheep & Lambs (number) 

Hogs (number) 

S. F. LIVING COSTS 1935-39 AVG. = 100 

Food (index) 

Clothing (index) 

Rent (index) 

Fuel and Light (index) 

House Furnishing Goods (index) 

Miscellaneous (index) 

All Items (index) 



1 .'.05(1,151 
1,071 

8.113.548 
1,181 

7.442.055 



1 (.00.520 
1.221,190 
2,428,755 
464,479 
8,624,099 



158.7 
144.9 
132.3 



15.088 
13.884 
1.204 



31.738 
1.837 
24.444 
328.915 
8.590 
980, 767 



233.183 
40.711 
19.485 

122.153 
50.814 



142.4 
137.6 
106.3 
92.6 
137.8 
129.6 
129.4 



1,370.312 
317.305 

5.370,037 



149.3 
140 7 
130.2 
159.3 



29.438 
1,211 

14.784 

265,902 

6.864 

391.177 



1.487.250 

1.139,819 

86.535 

686,968 

2,323 

205,320 
27.457 
6.765 

122,550 
48.548 



137.3 
127.3 
106.0 
92.1 
118.7 
124.3 
124.3 



81.7 
149.2 
307.9 
389.9 
307.9 
389.9 

18.2 
531.4 



35.6 
85.6 
15.5 
-9.9 



77.2 
46.4 
60.3 



104.9 
116.3 
27.5 



51.7 
65.3 

23.7 



36.0 
49.1 
95.3 



13.6 
48.3 
188.0 
-0.3 



2.867 
9.498,531 

1.078 

6.467,025 

1.008 

3.411,200 

68 

461,905 



8,847 
84.836.612 

8.395 
(.2,712.939 

9,444 
63.760.947 



12.838.645 
9.559.913 
22,281.180 



153.3 
142.2 
129.2 



246.272 

12.361 

153.520 

2.325.732 



7.525,647 
10.026,219 

1.316.140 

18,498.273 
15,692 

1.702,686 
271,494 
100.132 
796.155 
533.905 



142.6 
135.3 
106.2 
92.6 
127.1 



268,790 
1.013 

1,632.982 



6.128 
47.103.916 

6,677 
44,510,598 



11.171,229 
8.441.517 

10,255.423 
3.831.522 

53.670.569 



16 



73.922 
63.384 
10,538 



226,499 

9.433 

112.949 

2,039,937 



7.479.969.000 



11.958.228 

13.323.427 

858.860 

12.011.649 

15.160 

1.503.601 
195,615 
36,455 
886.904 
384.630 



143.9 
127.2 
106.0 
92.4 
119.0 
122.4 
126.2 



(a) These data are based on reports submitted to the Di\ 

(b) Federal Inspection — San Francisco District. 
Acknowledgment is hereby made to Thomas Magee & Sons, 
Reserve Bank of San Francisco. California State Departin 
United States Departments of Labor. Agriculture, and Com 



I of Labor Statistics and Law Enforcement. State of California. 



in 8c Bradstreet. Inc., local utilities, private organization?. Federal 
i of Industrial Relations. Agriculture, and Employment, and the 
e, and the United States Bureau of the Census, for the b.,-i .! , 



each contributed toward this survey compiled by the Research Department. San Francis... Cluitnb.-r ... Commerce 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Thursday, October 5, 1944 



FOREIGN TRADE TIPS 



The Chamber of Commerce cannot guar- 
antee anv firm or individual mentioned in 
TRADE TIPS. It is suggested the usual in- 
vestigation be made in each instance. For 
details, call World Trade Department, EX- 
brook 4511 and refer to the Trade Tip's 
number. 

3490 SHEATHING FELTS— F. McNeill & Co . 
Ltd.. 10 Lower Grosvenor Place. London. SAY. I., manu- 
facturers of ship sheathing felts, are seeking a repre- 
sentative in San Francisco for marketing that product. 
Samples are available for examination at the World 
Trade Department. 

3491 SALES REPRESENTATION IN HAWAII 
(United States! — K. C. Morley. P.O. Box 243. Aiea. 
Oahu. T.H.. is looking for business connections on a 
commission basis- Is interested in diversified accounts. 
especially construction materials 

3492 BUYING AGENT— Pan American Company. 
Gante 15-407, Mexico D.F.. Mexico, is acting as buying 
agent on a commission basis, of leather articles, jewelry. 
Mexican curios, etc. 

3493 BUSINESS CONNECTIONS— M. L. Fein. 
10602 Earle Avenue. Cleveland. Ohio, is anxious to con- 
tact individuals maintaining business in the following 
classifications: combination exporters, commission 
houses and foreign market analysts. 

3494 TRADE WITH CANADA— Milton J. Sharp. 
412 Obed Avenue. Victoria. B.C.. Canada, is interested 
in connections with manufacturers ol washing ma- 
chines, refrigerators, radios, sewing machines, etc. 

3495 REPRESENTATION IN COLOMBIA— Casa 
Shaps. Apartado 582. Barranquilla, Colombia, is de- 



3496 BUSINESS WITH COLOMBIA— Jorge E. 
Guzman, lbague (T) Colombia, wants to be put in 
touch with manufacturers and exporters of photo- 
graphic articles, radios, machinery, books, magazines, 

3497 AGENCIES AND REPRESENTATIONS— 

Francisco Henao Botero, Calle 45 Numero 2047, Bo- 
gota, Colombia, offers his services as an agent or rep- 
resentative of American exporters in business with 
Colombia. 

3498 DISTRIBUTOR AGENT IN PERU— Na- 
tional Agencies ol" America, Casilla 365, Lima, Peru, 



manufacturers and exporters of canned foods. 

3500 PRODUCTS TO ECUADOR— Enrique Valle 
Perez. Luque 10,1. Casilla 1045. Guayaquil, Ecuador, 
desires to represent manufacturers of a great variety 
of products. Ust is available at the World Trade De- 

3501 EXPORTATION TO ARGENTINA— Van 

Pevorgh & Cia. Calle Uruguay 440, Buenos Aires, Ar- 
gentina, are interested in the importation and exporta- 
tion of all kinds of products. 

3502 TOOLS— Bra»n & Vila, Avcnida Presidente 
R.S. Pena. 740. Casilla 2697. Buenos Aires. Argentina, 
would like to contact exporters of all kinds of tools, 
emerys and sawmill equipment. 

3503 BRAZILIAN REPRESENTATION— F. Sea- 
bra 8t Cia. Rua Paula Souza 208. Caixa Postal 5211. 
Sao Paulo, Brazil, offer their services, operating with 
representations, commissions and consignments in 

3504 BUSINESS WITH MEXICO— American 

Trading Company. Avenida Juarez 30, Mexico D.F.. 
Mexico, wants relations with firms interested in the 
exportation of any commodities from United States to 
Mexico and also the importation of Mexican products. 
List of articles is available at the World Trade Depart- 

3505 PALM ARTICLES— Salvador C. Musalem. 
Pachuca 52. Mexico D.F., Mexico, is in position to 
export any quantity of palm articles of great variety 
and styles. Lists and prices are available at the World 
Trade Department. 

3506 ANIMAL BY-PRODUCTS— K. Elumaiai 
Chetty S: Co.. 11 Varasidhi Vinayagar Koil Street. 
Periamet. Madras. India, are desirous to export Madras 
VTOOl, tannery, goat hair, cow tail hair, cow body hair, 
glue stock, etc Bank references supplied. 

3507 CHINESE PRODUCTS— G. T. May. c/o 
The Commonwealth Bank of Australia, Martin Place, 
Sydney. Australia, can supply any quantity ol taw 

■ u-tstiny -.it leathers, human hair, ginger, 
peanul -. et< and manufactured goods of great varieties 
I 

3508 CANDLES— B. Sorrentini & Co.. Calle Teluan 
68. apartado 1334. San Juan 6 Puerto Ric inter- 
ested mi establishing connections with candle inanu- 



Business Activity 

(Continued from page 1) 

yet reached its peak for the war 
period. 

For the second consecutive month 
there were no commercial failures re- 
ported in San Francisco jn August, 
thus establishing a new all-time rec- 
ord. Many of the activities were at 
new high levels in August with postal 
receipts, real estate sales, building 
permits, and placements ranging from 
80 per cent to more than 100 per cent 
above a year ago. For comparison of 
specific items, refer to tabulation on 
page 3. 

• August living cost index for all 
items in San Francisco at 129.4 was 
practically identical to July, but 
4.1 per cent above last August, with 
the 8 months' cumulative 1.7 per cent 
over a year ago. House furnishings, 
clothing, and rent items 8 months' 
averages were up 6.7 per cent, 6.4 per 
cent, and 4.4 per cent respectively, 
with the food, rent, and fuel items 
practically the same as a year ago. 

FOREIGN TRADE TIPS-c»»w 

3509 TEXTILES— Errandonea Steneri & Ci.i., 
Cerrilo 370. Primero Piso. Montevideo, Uruguay, 
representatives of a Cooperative for the Importation 
ol United States textiles, want 



3510 MACHINERY FOR MEXICO— A. Home. 
President. Horne-Ash Machinery Co.. 1188 Harrison 
Street. UN 5571, leaving October 21 for Mexico City. 
Should like to contact local machinery manufacturers 

f]i'-ni hi- ol ,i> vrlMpim; \[<'xi. .in tr.id'.' p-Lilum^ 

SPECIAL NOTICE: SHIPPING SPACE TO 
CHILE — The Chilean Navy's auxiliary vessel I ouCnto. 
now in San Francisco Bay. is looting for 3000 tons of 
commercial cargo for Chile. Interested shippers are 
invited to contact the Grace Line, 2 Pine Street. San 
Francisco. 



Published weekly at 333 Pine St., San Francisco, 
Zone 4, County of San Francisco. California. Will 
Williams, Editor. Telephone EXbrook 4511. Sub- 
scription, Fifty Cents a Year (Included in Annual 
Dues). Entered as Second Class matter April 26, 
1944, at the Post Office at San Francisco, Cali- 
fornia, under the act of March 3, 1870. 



The San Francisco Chamber of Commerce 

333 Plna Street, San Francisco 4 
EXbrook 43 11 



Greater Support from 
Chamber Members 
Sought in Drive Here 

A large volunteer group of San 
Francisco business executives is co- 
operating in a drive to obtain in- 
creased financial support for the San 
Francisco Chamber of Commerce 
from members during the week start- 
ing October 9 and ending October 13. 
• During this drive, volunteers 
will call upon a large segment of pres- 
ent members to enlist greater support 
for the Chamber, which will result in 
better service to them and to the 
community as a whole. 

"This Chamber of Commerce is 
the arm of all San Francisco busi- 
ness," commented Adrien J. Falk, 
president. "By making that arm 
stronger, you are providing for in- 
creased organized effort to better 
your individual business and all 
business in our great city now and 
in the postwar period." 



CofC Representatives at 
Supervisors' Meeting 

Attending the Board of Super- 
visors meeting, Monday, Octo- 
ber 2, was: 

John E. Pickett, member, 
San F'rancisco Chamber Board. 





* W PUBLISHED BY THE 

SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 



Volume I 



Thursday, October 12, 1944 



Number 28 




• Railroad Manpower Shortage — 

The National Priorities Committee 
has authorized an "A" priority for the 
positions of switchmen, brakemen and 
firemen on thirteen western railroads. 
This action was taken because of a 
critical shortage of railroad workers 
in the San Francisco Bay Area and 
elsewhere on the Pacific Coast which 
is congesting freight yards and sidings 
and is slowing up movement of war 
freight. A call for workers from other 
parts of the country has been made 
by Col. J. M. Johnson, Director of 
the Office of Defense Transportation. 
It is anticipated that this manpower 
priority, which is one of the highest 
in the country, will provide 974 
switchmen, 1,030 brakemen and 329 
firemen for the thirteen railroads. 

• Industrial Centralization — The 
Senate Special Committee to Investi- 
gate Centralization, in pursuance of 
S. Res. 190, filed a report on October 
3 recommending that Congress freeze 
all Government-owned war plants in 
eleven eastern and northeastern States 
immediately following the end of the 
European war. Senator McCarran, 
Chairman of the Committee, declared 
that an increase of population in the 
east that would come if the Govern- 
ment plants were permitted to be 
added to the present private indus- 
tries would create "an octopus that 
would blight the rest of the country 
and reduce the south and west to 
misery." The committee in the special 
report said that plants in New York, 
New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Massa- 
chusetts, Connecticut, Maryland, 
Delaware, Rhode Island, Ohio, Michi- 
gan and Illinois should be sold or 
leased only to industries buying them 
which had agreed to scrap an equal 
amount of their old plant space. 

A hearing of this Committee orig- 
inally scheduled to be held in Sacra- 
menlo on ( Ictober 13 and 14 has been 
postponed until November 16 and 17. 
From the Chamber's Washington office. 



New C of C Department to 
Promote Aviation in Area 



"On to Tokyo," 

S. F. Slogan, Spreads 

Throughout Nation 

"On to Tokyo!" — the slogan sug- 
gested by Ted Huggins, chairman of 
the Executive Committee of the Citi- 
zens' Committee for Y-E Day observ- 
ance is being taken up all over the 
country as the proper spirit with 
which cessation of hostilities in Europe 
should be observed. 

In a letter to members of the 
United States Chamber of Com- 
merce, Eric Johnston, president, 
said, "It is our conviction that the 
spirit on V-E Day should be that 
we have finally reached the real 
beginning of the end; that the 
time will then have arrived for 
putting everything we have into 
the slogan 'On to Tokyo'." 
• Johnston urged all member organ- 
izations to use their influence locally 
"to encourage continuance of full- 
speed operation of all plants and 
other business establishments," a po- 
sition proposed earlier by the San 
Francisco Chamber. 



Drive for Greater C of C 
Support Launched at Breakfast 

Forty team captains, team members 
and staff executives met Monday 
morning in the St. Francis Hotel for 
breakfast launching a drive to com- 
plete the Chamber's 1944 budget. 

The campaign is under the 
leadership of Richard D. Brigham, 
vice president, Anglo California 
National Bank, and will consist of 
gaining additional financial sup- 
port from Chamber members to 
enable the organization to carry 
out its program. 



To make the San Francisco Bay 
Area the passenger and freight air 
terminal of the Western World— this 
is the goal of the Aviation Depart- 
ment just formed by the San Fran- 
cisco Chamber of Commerce, according 
to Kenneth R. MacDonald, recently 
appointed manager of the new depart- 
ment. 

• Six-Point Program — In announc- 
ing the department's present six-point 
program, MacDonald said every effort 
would be expended to make this area 
the western terminal point of all air- 
lines operating north, south, east and 
west; to ^establish aircraft manufac- 
turing concerns here; to develop land- 
ing facilities sufficient to handle un- 
limited demands of commercial and 
private flying; to assist in establishing 
standards of safety, practicability, 
and efficiency in providing modern 
landing facilities; and to coordinate 
the efforts of every group, agency and 
individual active or interested in avia- 
tion. 

To accomplish these objectives 
the department will work through 
the Bay Area Aviation Committee, 
headed by E. V. Mills. 

• A Focal Point — In addition, Mac- 
Donald pointed out, the Aviation 
Department will be developed to 
serve as a focal point for all aviation 
activity in the Bay Area through 
maintenance of a complete and cur- 
rent library on aviation matters; 
through establishing itself as a cen- 
tral source of factual information rela- 
tive to aviation; and through the 
issuance of a weekly newsletter on 
current developments in the field. 

MicDonald plans to work closely 
with G. L. Fox, manager of the 
Chamber's Industrial Department 
in attracting aircraft manufac- 
turing concerns to this region and 
with Walter A. Rohde, manager, 
Transportation Department, in 
aviation rate matters. 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Thursday, October 12, 1944 



5. F. Retail Group Suggestion 
Receives Nationwide Support 



Policy on Parking 
Announced by C of C 

77/15 is the second of a series of Traffic and 
Transit policies approved by the San Francisco 
Chamber of Commerce on recommendation by 
its Street and Highway Committee. 

• Recommendation: 'That a com- 
prehensive plan for adequate modern 
off-street terminal facilities, distrib- 
uted to expedite traffic movement, be 
formulated to permit progressive pro- 
hibition of curbside parking and free 
the streets for moving traffic. 

• Statement: Careful studies reveal that 
curbside facilities are insufficient to meet the 
parking demand in the highly developed Cen- 
tral Business District of San Francisco during 
peak demands. Further, it must be recognized 
that curb parking is a secondary type of 
street use and must give way to the primary 
use of movement whenever the two uses come 
into serious conflict. 

It has been authoritatively stated that off- 
street parking is the most effective permanent 
solution to traffic congestion and parking 
problems. 

The Union Square Garage facilities provide 
simultaneous parking accommodations for 
about 1700 cars, or an equivalent of about 
one-fourth of all the curbside parking facili- 
ties that were available in the Central Busi- 
ness District prior to its construction. In a 
similar manner utilizing smaller units, addi- 
tional off-street terminal facilities should be 
selected and as rapidly as the facilities are 
completed, an equivalent amount of curbside 
parking should be eliminated. In this manner 
a systematic program of freeing the streets 
for moving traffic could be pursued. 

Victory Advertising Group 
Plays Important Role in War 

The Victory Advertising Commit- 
tee of the San Francisco Advertising 
Club, now well into its third year of 
aiding the country's war effort, has 
won overwhelming approval from all 
types of War Drive chairmen. 

• Organized early in 1 042 to act as 
a supplement to the San Francisco 
Advertising Club, the committee has 
stood as one unified professional 
group to provide advertising coopera- 
tion for organizations conducting war 
drives in San Francisco. 

Recruiting of women for the 
armed forces; of men and women 
for the Volunteer Port Security 
Force; assistance on manpower, 
housing, "Don't Travel", Red 
Cross Blood Donor, War Chest, 
and many other campaigns; all 
these important war activities 
have been greatly aided by the 
Victory Advertising group. 



Effort of the. Retail Merchants As- 
sociation of the San Francisco Cham- 
ber of Commerce to secure approval 
of the filing of Retailers Excise Tax 
returns without jurat has won sup- 
port by other retail organizations 
throughout the nation. 
• Following a suggestion by D. P. 
Street, the association's managing di- 
rector, the National Association of 
Retail Secretaries published the idea 
in their bulletin, with the result that 
a number of retail secretaries through- 
out the Cnited States have followed 
the suggestion and have sent similar 
requests to the Internal Revenue De- 
partment in Washington, D. C. 

Early action is expected. 



Packaging Company 
Locates Plant Here 

With the expectation of ultimately 
affording about 50 jobs in a new fac- 
tory, the Arga Packaging Company 
has leased 10,700 square feet of floor 
space at 55 Duboce Avenue, according 
to the San Francisco Chamber's In- 
dustrial Department. 

E. C. Rowley, a partner, reports 
that the company will engage im- 
mediately in the processing of va- 
rious packaging materials and of 
wide varieties of commodities and 
equipment for overseas move- 
ment. 

• San Francisco was selected as 
location for the plant, according to 
Rowley, because of large current de- ' 
mands for packaging services, the di- 1 
versify of business available here, and j 
thejnereasing importance of this city. 



SURPLUS PROPERTIES DISPOSAL 



The Washington Office of the San 
Francisco Chamber of Commerce has 
prepared the following analysis of 
disposal agencies and properties each 
will handle under present Surplus 
War Property Administration policy: 



Surplus War Property Admt 
William L. Clayton, Admin' 
811 Vermont Avenue N. W 
Washington. D. C 



Live animals, other than food annual-, textile basic 
manufactures; packaged chemicals lor retail outlets, 
hardware; fabricated products; glass products; abra- 
sives; pottery, industrial trucks, tractors, trailers, and 
accessories; motor lubrication equipment, batteries, 
automobile service station equipment; agricultural ma- 
chinery and implements: construction, mining, exca- 
vating and related machinery; office machines; plumb- 
ing and heating equipment; furniture and fixtures; 
optical instruments and apparatus; drugs and medi- 
cines; leather and paper products; rubber end-products; 
apparel; small arms and ammunition. 



200 Bush Street, San Francis* 
Telephone: Exbrook 6206 

(Nevada and Northern Part of California) 



Crude animal products, inedible; crude rubber; crude 
cork; fibers, vegetable and animal, unmanufactured 
(with exceptions); coal; crude petroleum, and related 
crude hydrocarbons; metallic ores, crude nonmetallic 
minerals; leather; boot and shoe cut stock and shoe 
findings; wood basic materials; building paper and 
building board; jute basic materials; cordage and twine 
(with exceptions); certain chemicals; iron; iron and 
steel scrap; steel (with exceptions); alloys, nonferrous 
metals; fabricated metal basic products; nonmetallic 
mineral basic products; miscellaneous basic materials, 
industrial machinery and equipment; electrical ma- 
chinery and apparatus, communications equipment 
and electronic devices, aircraft; railroad transportation 
equipment; industrial refrigeration units and ice mak- 
ing and cold storage plant systems; railroad signal fix- 
tures; airport, airway and seadrome lighting; water 
purification equipment (with exceptions); drugs and 
medicines other than prepared fur retail outlet- and 
institutions; silk yarn and silk semi-manufactures; 
rayon, nylon, etc., yarn and semi- 
sprinkler system components. 



War Food Administration 

Buell Maben, Regional Director 

S21 Market Street, San Fran, is, .. v < alii 

Telephone: Exbrook 8381 



U. S. Maritime Commission 

For Ships: Capt. E. J Morau, Assistant Depuf 
ministrator for Small Vessels 

K u 407S. Commerce Bldg. Washington. D. ' 



Navy Department 
Mr. John J Courtney 
Washington. D. C. 

Ships under cognizance ol the N.i . 
which tall into the categories of combat -hip- n n 

auxiliaries, other than those based on c nereia! d< 

or susceptible of commercial usage. Also such pror 
as appertains to or forms an integral part of a ship. 

National Housing Agency 
Col. Charles Starr. Director, 

Building Conversion Division 
Room 100ft. Longfellow Bldg., Washmgton, I). I". 

All surplus war property ol the class ol hoi 
property i im hiding such coiinniimt y laciln ies fina 
through the Federal Works Agency as are Itcatei 
the sites of housing projects I o(h -i than that undei 
control and jurisdiction <>I the War or Navy De; 



Federal Work Agency 

Edward R. Whitman. Deputy C 

Kstntf Management I.Pubh< ButMiug- \dinin 

tion) 
Kavtnotirt (.,. Church. Chiel, Surplus Real Estate 
Washington. D. C. 

All surplus war property ol the class ol COIHUI 
lav ill tie- financed throue.fi such agency, other 
those |i» ai-'d on the sites ot housing projects 
Foreign Economic Administration 
Paul Nit?e, Direetor ol Surplus I ii -;..,--, r 
Washington. D. C. 

All surplus property of whatever nature, hi 
oiir-nle i be continental United Si „•! : -, - ; ■ i n 
and possessions. 



Thursday, October 12, 1944 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Kern Co. C of C Publishes 
Monthly Business Analysis 

In an effort to improve and expedite 
service to 27 communities in Kern 
County, the Kern County Cham- 
ber of Commerce will issue briefed 
monthly bulletins analyzing county 
business and activity, according to an 
announcement by President Charles 
P. Lake. 

Statistical and news contribu- 
tions and all general information 
relative to the county's regular 
business activities and special 
projects will be solicited by the 
Chamber's publicity department 
in preparing the monthly analysis. 

Platinum Needed for 
War, States WPB 

Attention of manufacturing jewelers 
of the Bay Area is called to a state- 
ment supplied to the Chamber's In- 
dustrial Department through the 
Washington Office from Henry E. 
Stauss, chief. Precious Metals & Mer- 
cury Section, Miscellaneous Minerals 
Division, War Production Board, 
which in part is as follows: 

' 'The present situation, in brief, 
is that military and essential 
needs consume all available plati- 
num, and platinum cannot be re- 
leased for jewelry. 

"There appears to be little likeli- 
hood that this situation will change 
immediately upon the end of the 
European War or soon thereafter." 



Reciprocal Trade Policy 
Reaffirmed by Chamber 



Chamber Membership 
Praised by Local Firm 

The San Francisco Chamber of 
Commerce has just received a tribute 
from Dale D. Ames, of Ames Drug 
Co., suppliers to War Shipping Ad- 
ministration. 

In a letter to the Chamber, 
Ames said, "After careful con- 
sideration, I have come to the 
conclusion that not only I, but 
every business or professional man 
in San Francisco who has the wel- 
fare of his chosen city at heart, 
should show his faith by becom- 
ing a member of the Chamber of 
Commerce. 

"It happens that we are specialists 
in supplying medical orders to steam- 
ships. 

"We are proud to be members." 



State Measures Discussed 

A round table discussion on state 
ballot measures was held by the Cen- 
tral and Northern California Asso- 
ciation of Commercial Secretaries 
(CANCACS) last week. 

Discussion was led by Frank 
McKee, assistant general man- 
ager, California State Chamber of 
Commerce. 




Left to right, around the 



S F 



H. ward WiMoughby, S. F.; Ferd. Scheid. Sac; Frank K. Kunvan. S. P.; Roy G. 
Frank T. Peach. S. P.; Fred Klaus. Sac.; luhw Marx, S. F.: Albert Smith, Sac: E A. Breckenfeld. 
S. Fa \V l ,. Stone. Sac: P. Treiuain Loud, S. F\; Clarence Fallon. Sac; Karl Schuster. S F.; A. R. Johnston. Sac; 
Adrien J. Falk. S. Fa W. H. Haines, Sac: Arthur W. Toune. S. F.; Arthur S. Dudley. Sac; Louis B. Lundborg 
~ F.;_Dom A. Civitello, Sac; C. M. Coffing. Sac: C. H. Carter. 



Overrun, Sac: Sherwood Coffin. 
Culver S. F.; E, R. Lester, Sac; Frank E. Bodine. S. F.; W. George Spiln 
Sac; Carl J. Eastman. S. F.; James R. Wilson. Sac; C P. Tanner, S. F.; Earl Lee Kelly. S. F. 



Jack Leatherma 



Following studies by the San Fran- 
cisco Chamber's Postwar Planning 
Committee for Foreign Trade and a 
joint-meeting of representative- of 
the Chamber'- Foreign Trade and 
Agricultural committees, the Board 
of Directors has reaffirmed the San 
Francisco Chamber tariff policj favor- 
ing reciprocal trade. 

"Out of this joint conference, 
which was held in a spirit of real 
unity and a desire by both groups 
to develop broad areas of agree- 
ment," commented John E. Pick- 
ett, chairman Agricultural Com- 
mittee, "grew a better under- 
standing of the problems in each 
economic field." 

The reaffirmation is as foil. >\\ - 

"We reaffirm the San Francisco 
Chamber of Commerce Tariff policy 
enunciated F'ebruary 4. 1932, calling 
upon the Congress for machinery for 
reciprocal concessions in tariff rates 
in the interest of the revival and up- 
building of our foreign commerce. We 
again commend the Congress for pro- 
viding the requested machinery in the 
form of the Trade Agreements Act, 
passed in 1934 and renewed from time 
to time with the endorsement of the 
San Francisco Chamber of Com- 
merce." 

Original statement of tariff policy 
enunciated February 4. 1932 is as fol- 
lows 

"We believe that the principle of protec- 
tionism judiciously and scientifically applied 
is sound, but that when carried to the point 
reached by our recent tariff acts, it restricts 
foreign trade and adversely affects prosperity. 
Those concerned with the problems of our 
international economic relations are convinced 
that our tariff policy since the war is incon- 
sistent with our new position as the le 
industrial, financial and commercial nation of 
the world As we have restricted imports we 
have curtailed exports to the serious detri- 
ment of agriculture, our mass production in- 
dustries, and the American Merchant Marine. 
Foreign markets are necessary as an oul : 
our growing surpluses Interest on our foi 
investments and war debts cannot be p 
we proscribe imports. We must accept t he 
implications of our creditor position and the 
logic of our industrial ad\ ante. San I- rai 
is a great port and depends for its well being 
on commerce. We believe our hopes for the 
development of Pacific trade and shipi>> . 
San Francisco's harbor will not be re 
under our present high tariff policy. Our mem- 
bers engaged in export business are finding 
increasing difficulty in negot ; 
abroad because of the retalia 
governments to our own nig] 
steamship lines are suffering loss 
Because the revival of our foreign trade de- 
pends on the liberalization of the commercial 
policy of our customer countries as well as our 
own. we urge upon Congress the establish- 
ment of machinery for reciprocal concessions 
in tariff rates in the interest of the re\ i\ a! and 
upbuilding of our foreign commerce." 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Thursday, October 12, 1944 



FOREIGN TRADE TIPS 



The Chamber cannot guarantee any firm or 
individual mentioned in TRADE TIPS. It is 
suggested the usual investigation be made in 
each instance. For details call World Trade 
Department, EXbrook 4511 and refer to the 
Trade Tip's number. 

3511 CANNED FOODS— Comercial Palazon, Juan 
Rejon 62, Apartado 10. Puerto de La Las Luz. Palmas 
de Gran Canarias, Islas Canarias. wants to represent 
manufacturers and exporters of canned foods in the 
Canary Islands. 

3512 INTERESTING PROSPECTUS— The Con- 
sulate of Switzerland in San Francisco. 100 Bush Street. 
has received a prospectus on automatic shuttle em- 
broidery machine, 10 and 15 yards, with auxiliary ma- 
chines, manufactured by A. G. Adolph Surer, Arboa. 
Switzerland. Those interested may read this prospectus 
at the Swiss Consulate. 

3513 REPRESENTATION IN ARGENTINA— 
Ricardo F. Munoz. General Director of Limay Com- 
pany. Arroyo 842, Buenos Aires. Argentina, seeks 
American representations in Argentina. 

3514 EXPORTATION TO FRENCH MOROCCO 
—A La Lanterne Bleue, 240 Blvd. de la Liberte. Casa- 
blanca, French Morocco, intends to import foodstuffs, 
candies, canned goods, etc., and wants to contact San 
Francisco exporters of these commodities. 

3515 BUSINESS WITH GUATEMALA— Edmundo 
Nanne, Guatemala City, Guatemala, desires to contact 
exporters of flour, liquors, and wines. 

3516 TRADE WITH MEXICO— Productos Vege- 
tales Monterrey. Avenida Madero 713 Poniente. Mon- 
terrey N. L., Mexico, wants to be put in touch with 
drugstores and laboratories and exporters of their 
products. 

3517 CEMENT— Compania Transcontinental de 
Comercio, Paseo de La Rcforma 12. desp. 611, Mexico 
D. F., Mexico, is anxious to obtain immediately 10,000 

3518 HANDWOVEN TEXTILES— Exportad<r a 
Tipica Guatemalteca, 6a. Calle Poniente 14, Guatemal 3 

City, Guatemala, is in position to export handwuven 
textiles of wool and cotton in a great variety of styles 
and colors. 

3519 CUBAN CIGARS— Victor Najera. Apartado 
2272, La Habana, Cuba, is interested in exporting 

3520 REPRESENTATION IN PANAMA— Max R' 

Stempel. apartado 718, Panama. Rep. de Panama 
seeks representation of exporters of flour, canned foods, 
electrical appliances, etc. 

3521 COMMODITIES FROM ECUADOR— Ott° 
Gottschalk & Cia, Puerto de Palos 10, Quito. Ecuador. 
desire to export raw and dressed hug bristk-s, horse h.iir 
and cow hair. 

3.522 LEATHER PRODUCTS— Jacobo Sapnznik, 
Calle Avellaneda 3031. Buenos Aires. Argentina, wants 
to export various leather products. 

3523 CANNED PRODUCTS— Agenda General In- 
ternacional. Apartado 120, Cali, Colombia, is anxious 
to get in touch with canned products manufacturers and 
exporters. 

3524 REPTILE SKINS— Desiderio Stern & Cia.- 
Directorio 2359. Buenos Aires, Argentina, are in po- 
sition to export a great variety of reptile skins. Samples 
are available at the World Trade Department. 

3525 ARGENTINE COMMODITIES— Ventola & 
Cia., Cerrito 512, Buenos Aires, Argentina, desire 
exporting a diversity of Argentine products. List is 
available at the World Trade Department. 

3526 REPRESENTATION IN MEXICO— Marco 
Antonio Clotter y Parras, Apartado 20^7. Mexico 
D. F.. Mexico, wants to represent San Francisco 
manufacturers and exporters. 

3527 BUSINESS WITH PERU— Madison Trading 
Company, Apartado 670, Lima, Peru, seeks repre- 
sentation of American firms. 

3528 TRADE WITH ECUADOR— Luis A. Egas Z.. 
Apartado 1323, Guayaquil, Ecuador, is interested in 
representing San Fraucisco manufacturers and ex- 
porters. 

3529 REPRESENTATION IN COSTA RICA— 
Jose Montero A., Apartado 1817, San Jose. Costa Rica, 
wishes to represent American exporters. 

3530 TRADE WITH SOUTH AFRICA— Union 
Trade Development Corporation Ltd., P.O. Box 4394 
Johannesburg. South Africa, are interested in import 
and export business. 

3531 WALNUTS— Walter Goetzel, 5764 North- 
mount Avenue. Montreal, Canada, wants to contact 
any firm interested in selling walnuts for shipment to 
Montreal. 

3532 TRADE WITH TURKEY— Sigalla Biraderler, 
Tahta-Kale Menase Han 51-54, Istanbul, Turkey. 

'h firms engaged in exportation 



3533 REPRESENTATION IN BRAZIL— J. A. 

Kufilo de Oliveira, Rua Gouveia de Barros, 90, Caixa 
Postal 733, Recife. Brazil, seeks representation of San 
Francisco manufacturers of machinery, hardware, 
chemical products, etc. 



andc 



iberU, 

State of California. 

County of San Francisco — ss. 

Before me, a Notary Public in and for the State 
said, personally appeared Will Williams, who, 
sworn according to law, deposes and says that he is the Editor o 
the Bay Region Business and mat the following is, to the best of hi: 
knowledge and belief, a true statement of the ownership, manage 
ment (and if a'dailv paper, the circulation), etc., of the aforcsaic 
publication for_the date shown in the above caption, required bv thi 
Act of August 24, 1912. as amended bv the Act of March 3, 1933 
embodied in section 537, Postal Laws and Regulations, printed or 



:id h.i- 



I.III.U^I 



Publisher, San Fraocisco Chamber of Commerce, 333 Pine St., San 
Francisco 4, California Editor, Will Williams, San Francisco Cham- 
ber of Commerce. 333 Pine St., San Francisco 4, California. 
2. That the owner is: (If owned by a corporation, its name and 
nust be stated and also immediately thereunder rhe names 



well as those of each individual member, must be given.) 
San Francisco Chamber of Commerce. 333 Pine St.. San Francisco 4. 
California; AdriaiJ. Falk, President. Henry F. Grady, First Vice 

Holders owning or holding 1 per cent or more of total amount of 

bonds, mortgages, or other securities arc: None. 

4. That the two paragraphs nexr above, giving the names of the 
owners, stockholder •, and security holders, if any, contain not only 
the list of stockholders and security holders as they appear upon the 
books of the company but also, in cases where the stockholder or 



rity holder appears upon the books of the company 
ly other fiduciary rr ' 
i for whom such trustee is acting, is given; also that the 






of the person or cor- 

ven, also that the said 

embracing affiant's fall knowl- 



two paragraphs contan 

edge and belief as to the circumstances and condi 

stockholders and security holders who do not appear upon the 

books of the company as trustees, hold stock and securities in a 

capacity other than that of a bona fide owner; and this affiant has 

poration has any interest direct or indirect in the said stock, bonds, 

5. That the average number of copies of each issue of this pub- 
lication sold or distributed, through the mails or otherwise, to paid 
subscribers during the twelve months preceding the date shown 

above is; (.This inform.! dun is required from daily publications only.) 
(Signed) WILL WILLIAMS, 
Editor 
Sworn to and subscribed before me this 30tb day of September, 



SPECIAL NOTICE: The Brazilian Government 
Trade Bureau, 551 Filth Avenue, New York 17, N. Y., 
has supplied a Brazilian Bulletin in Portuguese lan- 
guage and another in English language, which contain 
trade opportunities and other valuable trade informa- 
tion. Those interested may see these bulletins by calling 
at the World Trade Department office. This office also 
has for distribution, pamplih-ts regarding corporations, 
labor and tax system in Brazil. 



Published weekly at 333 Pi 


ne St 


, San Francisco, 




County of San Frar 




California 


Will 


Williar 


ns, Editor. Telephon 


■ EXbrook 4S11 


Sub- 




n, Fifty Cents a Yea 


r(In 


:luded in A 


nnual 


Dues) 


Entered as Second 




matter Apr 


il 26, 


1944, a 


t the Post Office ai 






Cali- 


forma. 


under the act of Ma 


ch 3, 


1870. 





The San Francisco Chamber of Commerce 

333 Pine Street. San Francisco 4 
EXbrook 4511 



Company Brochure 
Praised by Lundborg 

A sales brochure recently put out 
by Gantner & Mattern Co. using the 
San Francisco Bay Area as a back-J 
drop for presenting its products has 
received the warm approval of Louisl 
B. Lundborg, general manager, San] 
Francisco Chamber. 

Complimenting the company 
on the brochure's effectiveness as j 
a commercial presentation, Lund- 
borg also said, "If every firm in , 
San Francisco did what you have 
done, the cumulative result in 
terms of selling the San Francisco 
Bay Area would be beyond any- 
thing that has ever been contem- 
plated." 



I. B. M. at San Jose 

International Business Machines! 
Corporation has designated its SaJ 
Jose office as regional headquarters,! 
with supervision over all westerra 
branches, including Denver, accord* 
ing to an announcement by the Sam 
Jose Chamber of Commerce. 



C of C Representatives at 
Supervisors' Meeting 

Attending the Board of Super- 
visors meeting, Monday, Octo- 
ber 9, was: 

Arthur B. Poole, member, 
San Francisco Chamber Board. 




* W PUBLISHED BY THE 

SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 



Volume I 



Thursday, October 19, 1944 



Number 29 



WASHINGTON NOTES 



• Reconversion — In a letter to Con- 
gressman King of California, J. A. 
Krug, Chairman of the War Produc- 
tion Board, has stated that in the year 
after V-E-Day production throughout 
the country will be cut back about 32 
percent from the August 1944 rate. 
"The reduction in prime contracts in 
Pacific Coast plants will not be quite 
so great; it will run to somewhat over 
25 percent." According to Krug, the 
West Coast will have a good margin of 
released facilities and manpower to 
get started on reconversion, and his 
statement would appear to provide 
evidence that the West Coast will not 
be maintained 100 percent in war pro- 
duction while the rest of the country 
tools up and starts on civilian output. 

• Clothing — The War Production 
Board has announced that work 
clothing manufacturers will not be re- 
quired to produce a minimum of 70 
percent bib overalls. In view of the 
fact that practically all of the work 
clothing manufacturers on the West 
Coast produce waist overalls or dun- 
garees, for which there is a demand, 
this will provide continued production 
and employment on the Coast. 

• Surplus War Property — Accord- 
ing to recent figures, surplus war prop- 
erty in the amount of 28 million dol- 
lars was disposed of in August. This 
represented a 7.4 percent disposal rate. 
On this basis it would take a little 
more than a year to dispose of the sur- 
plus on hand in August. 

• Trucks — Authorizations for 26,179 
light-heavy and 6,425 heavy-heavy 
trucks to be produced during the first 
half of 1945 for commercial use were 
announced recently by the WPB. 

Authorizations for manufac- 
turers in the Bay Area follow: De 
Martini Motor Truck Co., San 
Francisco, 5 light-heavies; Mac- 
Donald Truck & Mfg. Co., San 
Francisco, 11 light-heavies and 4 
heavy-heavies for a total of 15; 
and Peterbilt Motors Co., Oak- 
land, 97 heavy-heavies. 
From the Chamber's Washington office. 



Marsh Aids Berkeley 
Hospital in Getting 
Priorities from WPB 

On request of J. D. Sarber, vice 
president and general manager, Berke- 
ley Chamber of Commerce, Frank E. 
Marsh, manager, San Francisco Cham- 
ber Washington Office, obtained pri- 
orities needed to build a 100-bed addi- 
tion to the Berkeley Hospital. 
• Federal aid had previously been 
granted under Federal Works Ad- 
ministration to build these facilities, 
but priorities for material were denied 
by the War Production Board in 
Washington. 

In a letter of thanks, Alfred E. 
Maffly, superintendent, Berkeley 
Hospital, said, "Because of the 
splendid assistance we received 
. . . from Marsh and his direct con- 
tacts with the WPB in Washing- 
ton, we have been granted AA-3 
priority preference rating for this 
construction and can immedi- 
ately proceed with our construc- 
tion plans." 



Educational Hearing 
Held In Berkeley 

Basic fundamentals, patterned to 
gear California's educational system 
to meet necessary requirements in the 
postwar era and to match new devel- 
opments in the fields of engineering, 
research, foreign trade, business and 
marketing, are being presented at a 
two-day hearing and conference in 
Berkeley, ending today. 

• The hearing, conducted by the 
Assembly Interim Committee on Post- 
war Rehabilitation, is under the joint 
auspices of the Oakland and Berkeley 
Chambers of Commerce. 

• Purpose of the conference is to 
call upon all agencies in the state to 
give an accounting of their activity 
and present suggestions for legislation 
to gear the state's educational system 
to the postwar period. 



Citizens Group Against 
$60 at 60 Measure 
Organized for Fight 

A "Citizens Committee Against 
Proposition No. 11" with Maurice E. 
Harrison as chairman and James K. 
Lochead as treasurer has just been 
formed, according to an announce- 
ment by Adrien J. Falk, president, 
San Francisco Chamber of Commerce. 
•A preliminary poll of publicopinion 
indicates real danger that this mea- 
sure may pass unless extensive activi- 
ties in opposition are undertaken at 
once, Falk said. 

Pointing out the drastic effects 
which the measure would have in 
increased taxation, and higher busi- 
ness and living costs, Falk urged each 
individual organization of civic, trade, 
merchant, business and like groups to 
assist in an educational campaign, in- 
forming the public on this gross in- 
come tax-pension scheme. 



California Cotton Production 
Opportunities Under Study 

Do opportunities exist in California 
justifying establishment of cotton 
mills? — This is the fundamental ques- 
tion being studied by Col. C. P. Wood, 
vice president, Lockwood-Greene En- 
gineers, Inc., New York, who will re- 
turn to San Francisco next week. 

Lockwood-Greene have been en- 
gaged by Kern, Kings and Tulare 
counties to make a technical 
study of possible uses for Cali- 
fornia cotton in California. Wood 
has been in frequent consultation 
with the Chamber's Industrial 
Department which is now seeking 
data in regard to the San Fran- 
cisco market for cotton products. 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Thursday, October 1 9, 1944 



Increased Demurrage Charges 
Order to Affect Local Shippers 

The new nation-wide service order 
by the Interstate Commerce Commis- 
sion providing for increased demur- 
rage charges on box cars will affect 
many San Francisco shippers and re- 
ceivers, according to Walter A. Rohde, 
manager, San Francisco Chamber 
Transportation Department. 
• The order, which will go into ef- 
fect October 19, at 7:00 a.m. and 
continue for thirty days, makes de- 
murrage $2. 20 per day for the first two 
days, S5.50 for the third day, $11.00 
for the fourth day and S16.50 for each 
succeeding day after expiration of free 
time. 

Average agreement credits will 
only apply the first two days. 



Spring Apparel 
Market Week 
Set For November 

S Spring Market Week for women's 
apparel and millinery will be held 
November 8 through November 12, 
according to the San Francisco Manu- 
facturers and Wholesalers Associa- 
tion. 

• A four-day Men's Merienda at- 
tracting buyers from all over the 
country for showings by manufac- 
turers in this area ends today. 

According to the association, 
the November market week exhib- 
its will be held in the showrooms 
of individual firms, and many 
will remain open on Sunday, No- 
vember 12, for the convenience of 
Western buyers. 



Factory Interest Here 
Sought by Detroit Man 

Having disposed of his Detroit busi- 
ness, an experienced manufacturer 
is seeking a controlling interest in a 
San Francisco manufacturing enter- 
prise. He is prepared to invest S40,000 
or more. Principals who are interested 
in disposing of all or a major part of 
a San Francisco firm are invited to 
communicate with the Chamber's In- 
dustrial Department, EXbrook 4511. 



Alaskan Air Route 

An application to link Fairbanks, 
key city of the Alaskan interior, with 
San Francisco and other cities along 
its Pacific coast and coast-to-coast 
system has been filed by United Air- 
lines with the Civil Aeronautics 
Board at Washington, D. C. 



C of C Group Visits 
Stockton For "Good 
Neighbor" Meeting 

The Board of Directors and Domes- 
tic Trade Committee of the San Fran- 
cisco Chamber visited , Stockton as 
guests of the president and directors 
of the Stockton Chamber, Tuesday, 
October 17. 

• Program for the day included a 
get-together luncheon; personal calls 
on Stockton businessmen; and a con- 
ducted tour of the Army Ordnance 
Depot and transport loading facilities 
of the Port of Stockton. 

"This 'good neighbor' visit 
proved extremely enjoyable and 
beneficial for the furtherance of 
cooperation between our two com- 
munities," commented Carl J. 
Eastman, Domestic Trade Com- 
mittee member and Chairman of 
the Good Neighbor Visiting Com- 
mittee. 



Redwood Empire Association 
Holds Victory Meet Oct. 20-21 

Led by California's governor, Earl 
Warren, civic, municipal, industrial 
and agricultural leaders in various 
classifications of enterprise through- 
out the West will take part in the 
"Victory Preparation Conference" 
and 22nd annual meeting of the Red- 
wood Empire Association on Friday 
and Saturday, October 20 and 21, at 
Hoberg's in Lake County, according 
to Chas. H. Demaray, Association 
president. 

Other notables at the conference 
will be Major-General Charles H. 
Bonesteel, Commanding General, 
Western Defense Command, and 
Vice- Admiral John W. Greenslade, 
Pacific Co-ordinator of Naval Lo- 
gistics. 



San Leandro Company 
Expands Eastern Office 

To meet rapidly increasing sales 
demands in the eastern section of the 
nation for its products, the Friden 
Calculating Machine Company, Inc., 
of San Leandro, will open enlarged 
New York City offices on October 19 
and 20, according to Leslie J. Free- 
man, manager San Leandro Chamber 
of Commerce. 

• New offices will house both the 
New York City and Eastern sales and 
service division as well as a service 
training school, said Carl M. Friden, 
president of the company. 



Progress Reported On 
C of C Drive For 
Greater Support 

Progress reported on the San Fran- 
cisco Chamber of Commerce drive to] 
gain increased support from the city's 
business firms reflects members' ap-.' 
proval of the job the Chamber has 
been doing for this community, acH 
cording to Richard D. Brigham, vice! 
president, Anglo-California National 
Bank, who is leading the drive. 

• Team leaders who are assisting 
Brigham in the campaign are Verne ' 
A. Culver, Sales Manager, Chanslor 
& Lyon Co. ; Ed Perkins, Branch 
Manager, International Business Ma- 
chines Corporation; and Frank Tal- 
cott, District Sales Manager, Pacific; 
Gas & Electric Company. 

"These team leaders and their 
groups are doing a fine job and 
should be congratulated," com- 
mented Brigham. 

• Team members are as follows: 
under Culver's leadership — R. CM 
Gingg, Clyde H. Allen, Ben E. Jor-J 
dan, James M. Grant, Ed. Gen-J 
berg, Francis Ward, Hugh McGlynn, j 
Warder Wheldon, and E. A. Brecken- ] 
feld; under Perkins' leadership — Glen] 
H. Ticer, Oliver D. Old, J. Arthur 
Younger, J. D. Baker, J. F. McGrath, 
Osgood Murdock, R. H. Rebele, 
Merritt Rowland, and Arthur L. 
Scott; and under Talcott's leadership] 
— Warren Catterlin, F. M. Ratto,] 
L. E. Deu Pree, W. H. Dimond, D| 
Porter Dunlap, Walter E. Finn, Les- I 
ter B. Johnson, Ray Rhodes, andj 
Frank W. Ross. 



San Francisco Kiwanis 
Elects Mills as Head 

Harold B. Mills, manager, Public 
Relations Department, San Fran- 1 
cisco Chamber of Commerce, has ; 
been elected president of the San] 
Francisco Kiwanis Club for the vear 
1945. 

Mills has been active with the San 
Francisco club for 6 years, having 
served as secretary and a member of 
the Board of Directors. 

Adrien J. Falk, president of the 
San Francisco Chamber of Com- 
merce, in congratulating Mills ex- 
pressed satisfaction in knowing a 
member of the Chamber staff had 
been chosen for such a responsible 
position. Falk also congratulated 
the Kiwanis Club, saying, "Mills' 
ability, energy and enthusiasm 
will unquestionably lead the club 
to a new high." 



Thursday, October 19, 1944 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



A Wartime Salute to Our Navy! 

REAR ADMIRAL 

CARLETON H. WRIGHT 

Commandant, 12th Naval District 

WILL BE HONORED GUEST AND SPEAKER 
AT THE 

ANNUAL NAVY DAY LUNCHEON 
Friday, October 27 

/';/ THE COMMERCIAL CLUB 



*Tables are not reserved, but tickets 
must be purchased in advance. 
Members will be taken care of to 
the limit oj capacity, but it will be 
to your advantage to make reser- 
vations early before ticket sales 
are opened to the general public. 



SPONSORED BY 



San Francisco Chamber of Commerce 
San Francisco Commercial Club 
Navy League of the United States 

San Francisco Chapter 

San Francisco Junior Chamber of Commerce 



AN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 
i33 Pine Street, San Francisco, California 

Please reserve place(s) for me at $1.50 each at 

uncheon honoring Rear Admiral Carleton H. Wright on Friday, 
)ctober 2 7, in the San Francisco Commercial Club, at 12 noon. 
Kindly enclose self-addressed envelope for forwarding tickets.) 

Name 

Check Firm 

!nclosed Address 



*At Luncheon in 

The San Francisco 
Commercial Club 

Friday noon, October 27, 1944 



Price $1.50 per plate 
{ $1.46 plus 4c tax } 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Thursday, October 19, 1944 



FOREIGN TRADE TIPS 



The Chamber cannot guarantee any firm 
or individual mentioned in Trade Tips. It is 
suggested the usual investigation be made in 
each instance. For details call World Trade 
Department, EXbrook 4511 and refer to the 
Trade Tip's number. 

3534 REPRESENTATION IN NICARAGUA— 

Roger Albaunza y Cia. Ltda., Masaya, Nicaragua, are 
i represent manufacturers and exporters, in 



3535 LEATHER PRODUCTS— Tademe, Tucuman 
3114-18. Buenos Aires. Argentina, seeks to contact im- 
porters of leather products, especially ladies' handbags. 

3536 TRADE WITH CANADA— W. R. Campbell 
Ltd., 1206 Homer Street, Vancouver, B. C, Canada, 
wants to get in touch with manufacturers for their 
representation in Canada. 

3737 CLOTHING— Novoa. Angel & Cia. Primera 
calle poniente nuinero 4, San Salvador. El Salvador, 
desire to obtain representation of manufacturers and 



Sinaloa, Mexico, wishes connections with manufac- 
turers of cellophane and glasine bags. 

3539 BUSINESS WITH SWEDEN— Aktiebolaget 
Herbert Dieden & Co.. P. O. Box 167. Malmo. Sweden, 
is anxious to contact manufacturers and exporters of 
textiles of all kinds, also yarns, needles, buttons, etc. 
For full information, write to Royal d insulate General 



of Sweden, 64 Pine St., San Fran 



11, California. 



3542 ARGENTINE LIQUORS— G. A. Dickinson. 
Bartolome Mitre 427. Buenos Aires. Argentina, wants 
to export vermouth, dry gin. wines, liqueurs, cider, etc. 

3543 SPHAGNUM PEAT MOSS PADS— North 
American Peat Ltd.. 20S Pacific Building, Vancouver. 
B. C. Canada, wishes connections with asparagus and 
vegetable growers' organizations and packing houses 
for selling spagnum peat moss pads. 

3544— REPRESENTATION IN NEW YORK— 
Puerto Rico Commerce and Industry Association, 225 
Broadway, New York. 7. N. Y., is interested in repre- 
senting canners of fruit, vegetables and juices. 

3545 MEXICAN TOMATOES— East Coast Prod- 
uce Company. P. O. Box 1. Nuevo Laredo, Tamauli- 
pas, Mexico, have 5000 at res tomatoes and are inter- 
ested to contact buyers F. O. B. Nuevo Laredo. They 
start harvesting in November. 

3546 TEXTILES— Ventas Sedalana S. A., Dis- 
tribuidora. Importadoray Exportadora, Calle Lima 157. 
Buenos Aires, Argentina, desires to appoint a repre- 
sentative in San Francisco on a commission basis for 
:hoir 'Qxtilcproduc's 

3547 SYRINGES AND NEEDLES— Ociam. Ave- 
nida San Martin, 4641. Buenos Aires, Argentina, wants 
to export hypodermic syringes and hypodermic needles. 



3549 POSTWAR BUSINESS -< ieneral Export 
Association of Sweden, Vasagatan 12 Stockholm, 
Sweden, is looking for bu-irK-^ connections for postwar 
era- This firm is mainly interested in marketing black 
granite. 

3550 IMPORTATION FROM DAKAR— E. Cherix, 
125 Rue Carnot, Dakar, would like to contact im- 
porters ol gum arabic. beeswax, colonial woods, cocoa, 
different oils, etc. Also wants to establish relations 
with manufacturers of plastics. 

3551 REPRESENTATION IN HAWAII— Mr. Ken- 
neth K. McLenahan, Manufacturers Representative, 
is interested in representing San Francisco manufac- 
turers in the Territory of Hawaii, particularly those 
manufacturers reconverting to civilian needs. Until 
October 21 Mr. McLenahan may be reached at the St. 
Francis Hotel, San Francisco; after that date: P.O. 
Box 2652. Honolulu 3, Hawaii. 



Trade Promotion Corporation, in the rotunda of the 
Mills Building. 220 Montgomery Street, where you 
ni.i\ -'.< the variuiis prides uianufai aired in Argentina. 
If you are interested in further details, call at Argentine 
Trade Promotion Corporation. Mills Building Suite 
929 VU 0264. San Francisco, California. 



Foreign Trade Council 
Uses C of C Policies 

According to a wire received from 
Louis B. Lundborg, general manager, 
San Francisco Chamber, while at- 
tending the 31st National Foreign 
Trade Convention in New York, the 
National Foreign Trade Council has 
adopted final declarations of policy 
substantially paralleling recommenda- 
tions of the Chamber's Postwar Plan- 
ning Committee for Foreign Trade, 
as presented by William L. Mont- 
gomery, manager, World Trade De- 
partment. 



Minerals Industry Building 
Proposal To Be Studied 

Need for establishing a Minerals 
Industry Building at a central loca- 
tion in San Francisco to contain gov- 
ernmental agencies identified with the 
mining industry will be the subject 
of study for a special sub-committee 
of the Mining Committee of the San 
Francisco Chamber. 

Members of the special sub-com- 
mittee appointed by George B. Dodge, 
Chairman of the Chamber's Mining 
Committee, are Jack How, Phil R. 
Bradley, Jr., Gordon Gould, Albert 
F. Knorp and W. W. Mein, Jr. 



Published weekly at 333 Pine St., San Ft 
Zone 4. County of San Francisco, California. Will 
Williams, Editor. Telephone FXbrook 4511. Sub- 
scription, Fifty Cents a Year (Included in Annual 
Dues). Entered as Second Class matter April 26, 
1944, at the Post Office at San Francisco, Cali- 
fornia, under the act of March 3, 1870. 



DOMESTICTRADETIPS 



A digest of correspondence received from those 
desiring, or offering, lines of merchandise for repre- 
sentation. They are listed here as a service without - 
necessarily bearing endorsement by the Chamber. 
For further details, contact the Domestic Trade 
Department, EXbrook 4511, Ext. 56. 

D-6064— LLOYD J. SMITH. WHELAN-SM1TH ] 
COMPANY. 124S Wholesale Street. Los Angeles. 21. 
California, endeavoring to obtain representation of 1 

San Francisco manufacturers and processors of foud 
products for Southern California territory. 

D-6065— HARVEY A CARN'ES, THE MIXEAR 
STUDIO. 1305 State Street. Qmncy. Illinois, liking 
for manufacturers agent to sell carved wooden pins. 1 

D-6066— JOHN H. CALDWELL. CALDWELL ] 
SECRETARIAL SERVICE, 617 Jergins Trust Build- 1 
ing, Long Beach,. 2. California, wishes to represent ■ 
local firm in the Long Beach, Los Angeles Area. 

D-6067— G. H. DOWNEY, 14515 Lake Avenue, \ 
Lakewood. Ohio, manufacturers of electrical insulating J 
materials, wishes representation in the Wi Stei n Stab . . 

D-6068— W. S. WOODS. WOODS BROKERAGE 
COMPANY, 3<>S6 Degnan Blvd.. Los Angeles. 43. | 
interested in securing food and confection accounts lor I 
southwestern territory. 

D-6069— RAYMOND D. STEVENS. PIERCE & 4 
STEVENS, INC.. 710 Ohio Street. Buffalo, New Y-rk. 
wishes lin.al dealer for bowling alley lacquers. 



Participation at Mining Meet 

Appreciation of the participation! 
by official delegates from the 1 1 west-} 
ern states and South Dakota in the] 
recent Western Mining Conference; 
held in San Francisco has been ex-a 
pressed to the governors of the 121 
states by Adrien J. Falk, president of' 
the San Francisco Chamber of Com* 
merce. 

"Such conferences stimulat 
unity and progress." 



Subscribe to the 
WAR CHEST! 



The San Francisco Chamber of Commerce 

333 Pino Street. San Francisco 4 
EXbrook 4511 





V W PUBLISHED BY THE 

SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 



Volume I 



Thursday, October 26, 1944 



Number 30 



WASHINGTON NOTES 



• Surplus Property — The Surplus 
War Property Administration has is- 
sued the first installment of a "Hand- 
book of Standards for Describing Sur- 
plus Property." The purpose of the 
handbook is to establish the minimum 
of information that should be supplied 
in listing surplus property while at the 
same time furnishing enough descrip- 
tion in commercial terms to form an 
adequate basis for resale. Additional 
sections of the handbook covering ad- 
ditional commodities will be issued 
from time to time. The War and Navy 
Departments will have a limited sup- 
ply available for their contractors, 
and copies are available upon request 
to the Chamber's Washington Office. 

• Lumber — Estimated lumber pro- 
duction in August was 3,208,339,000 
board feet, an increase of 12.8 percent 
over July production, the War Pro- 
duction Board has reported. This per- 
centage increase, while representing 
more than a normal seasonal increase, 
is accentuated by low production in 
July. WPB explained. Total produc- 
tion for the first eight months of l'>44 
was 22,406,421,000 board feet, or 2.4 
per cent less than for the same period 
in 1943. 

• Travel -The War Production Board 
has joined in support of the Office of 
Defense Transportation's appeal to 
the nation to eliminate all. non- 
essential travel and thus make room 
for the imperative movement of 
troops, wounded veterans returning 
from overseas, and persons engaged in 
important war assignments. 

• Veterans — Brig. Gen. Frank T. 
Hines, Administrator of Veterans' 
Affairs, has announced the issuance of 
regulations concerning the guarantee 
of loans by the Veterans Administra- 
tion for veterans of th; present war. 
Proceeds of the loans are to be used 
for the purchase of homes under Sec- 
tion 501 of the Servicemen's Readjust- 
ment Act of l')44, popularly known as 
theG. I. Bill of Rights. 

From the Chamber's Washington Office. 



Rear Admiral Wright Speaks at 
Tomorrow's Navy Day Lunch 



Planning Commission 
Completes Improvement 
Report for Postwar S. F. 

A preliminary six-year program of 
postwar improvements representing a 
total expenditure of S131,180,000 has 
been completed by the San Francisco 
City Planning Commission. 
• The program lists and cites 
methods for financing some 277 proj- 
ects. 

According to the Commission, the 
report "outlines a course of action 
which would make this a better city 
and, if an emergency develops, open 
wide fields of useful public employ- 
ment. 

"We could spend a large sum on 
patch-work alone . . . This would 
provide employment but in the 
end would leave the City substan- 
tially the same kind of place it is 
today, with no major problems 
solved. 

"We must therefore include more 
constructive types of projects ... to 
produce increasingly better working 
and living conditions. All our civic 
improvements — airports, motor ways, 
sewers, transit lines, housing, schools, 
public buildings — must be modern- 
ized." 

Bowes, S. F. C of C, Raised to 
Captain in Marine Air Corps 

Eugene G. Bowes, formerly staff 
executive of the San Francisco Cham- 
ber of Commerce in sharge of postwar 
planning, has been promoted to the 
rank of captain in the Marine Air 
Corps Intelligence. 

Bowes left the Chamber in June 
to become Second Lieutenant in 
the Marine Corps. At Quantico, 
Va., U. S. Marine Air Forces 
Ground School, Bowes was top 
man in his class. 



Rear Admiral Carleton H. Wright, 
commandant, 12th Naval District, 
will be honored guest and speaker at 
the annual Navy Day lunch to be held 
tomorrow, October 27, at the Com- 
mercial Club. 




Tomorrow's Speaker — Rear Adn 
Carteton H. Wright 

• The luncheon, which will be a 
wartime salute to the Navy, is spon- 
sored by the San Francisco Chamber 
of Commerce, San Francisco Com- 
mercial Club, San Francisco Junior 
Chamber, and the Navy League of the 
United States, San Francisco Chapter. 
Major General Charles H. Bon- 
esteel, Commanding General, 
Western Defense Command, will 
pay tribute to the Navy on behalf 
of the Army. 

Richmond Reconversion 

One hundred and sixteen of the 158 
manufacturing plants in Richmond 
will either not need to reconvert or 
their change-over from wartime to 
peacetime production can be accom- 
plished quickly, according to an an- 
nouncement by the Richmond Cham- 
ber of Commerce. 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Thursday, October 26, 1944 



Subsidy Limitation Bill 
Supported byChamber 

Limitation of subsidies paid to 
manufacturers of cotton insulation by 
the Federal Government is the object 
of action just taken by the San Fran- 
cisco Chamber Board of Directors on 
recommendation of the Industrial 
Committee, in support of H.R. 4616, 
known as the Gerlach Bill, which has 
been pending before the Banking and 
Currency Committee. 

While the bill would stop subsi- 
dies supporting competition with 
existing industries making insula- 
tion from redwood bark and other 
materials, it would not prohibit 
financial assistance by the gov- 
ernment for research and develop- 
ment of new uses of cotton and 
other agricultural materials. 
• Payments made to cotton insula- 
tion manufacturers are said to have 
increased from $3,300 in 1940 to 
$5,400,000 in fiscal 1944, threatening 
the existence of manufacturers of non- 
subsidized insulation. 

Oakland's "WorkPile" Total 
Passes $50,000,000 Mark 

Oakland's city wide "Work Pile" 
survey has now passed the $50,000,000 
mark, and from all indications this 
total will be doubled within the next 
month, according to R. H. Biggs, 
chairman, Work Pile Committee of 
the Oakland Postwar Planning Com- 
mittee, affiliated with the Oakland 
Chamber of Commerce. 

More than $50,000,000 worth of 
work has been reported by busi- 
ness establishments in 39 separate 
classifications to be undertaken 
as soon as men and materials are 
available. 



University Sta rts Course 
in Quality Control Soon 

Emergency instruction in the new 
technique of quality control by statis- 
tical methods will be given by the 
University of California War Training 
Program, in cooperation with the War 
Production Board, in an eight-day 
full-time course starting November 8 
on the Berkeley campus. 

• Dr. Holbrook Working, chief, 
quality control section, WPB Office 
of Production Research and Develop- 
ment, will direct the course. 

• Registration for the tuition-free 
course will be received up to Novem- 
ber 1 by W. K. Schmelze, University 
of California War Training Center, 
201, California Hall, Berkeley 4 (Tele- 
phone THornwall 5377). 



Montgomery, Soon to Leave 
C of C, Returns from East 



Advance Agreements 
On Termination of 
Contracts Possible 

Firms producing war material for 
the Army now, may, if they so desire, 
make an advance agreement on the 
amount that will be due when a con- 
tract is terminated, according to the 
San Francisco Chamber's Domestic 
Trade Department. 

Details have just been worked 
out between the Army and Office 
of Contract Settlement and de- 
pend largely upon whether a firm's 
accounting records will allow pric- 
ing through the various stages of 
production. 

• Advantages are: (1) Immediate 
payment of up to 90 percent of claim; 
(2) Obviates 30 day wait after Notice 
of Termination; (3) Expedites plant 
clearance. 

• Possible disadvantages are, 
changing production costs and dis- 
posal prices. 

Bay Area Leads Nation 
Again in Shipbuilding 

Bay Area shipyards again domi- 
nated shipbuilding in the United 
States during September, according to 
a report received by the Industrial De- 
partment, San Francisco Chamber, 
from the Maritime Commission. 

• Vessels Built — How the West 
Coast led the Nation and the Bay- 
Area headed the Coast is indicated by 
the following data showing numbers 
of vessels built by areas: 

Area Vessels 

Pacific Coast 45 

East Coast 39 

Gulf Coast 32 

Great Lakes 8 

Total 124 

Northwest 17 

Bay Area 19 

Southwest.. 9 

Total . . 45 

Broadcasting System Makes 
Local Station WestCoastCenter 

With increased activity in Pacific 
war zones, Mutual Broadcasting Sys- 
tem has made KFRC control center 
for all incoming reports from the Paci- 
fic, according to an announcement by 
the New York manager of Mutual's 
news division recently. 



Dr. H. H. Kung, Chinese Minister 
of Finance and head of China's dele--! 
gation to the Bretton Woods confer- 
ence, will soon visit San Francisco, 
according to Wm. L. Montgomery, 
manager, World Trade Department, 
San Francisco Chamber, who re- 
turned Monday from New York and 
Washington, D.C. 

• Montgomery leaves his Chamber ] 
post to assume new duties November 
1, as managing director of the San 
Francisco Bay Regional Board of the J 
China-America Council of Commerce 
and Industry, Inc. 

According to Louis B. Lund- 
borg, Chamber General Manager, 
"Montgomery is the best qualified 
man who could have been chosen 
for this key position. His selection 
is a recognition of the outstand- 
ing job he has done in the build- 
ing up of the Chamber's foreign 
trade program. 

"The China-America Council is al 
valuable addition to San Francisco's ; 
foreign trade resources, in which we 
are the recognized center," Lund-1 
borg continued. "Montgomery will be! 
missed by the Chamber, but the sound ! 
foundation he has built into the 
Chamber's World Trade Department 
will make the task of his successor) 
vastly easier, and he will remain asl 
one of the most valued of the com- 1 
munity's permanent assets in the 
world trade field." 



Aviation Newsletter Instituted 
for Weekly Distribution Here 

A weekly newsletter was instituted, 
Monday, October 23, by the Bay 
Area Aviation Committee to be dis-j 
tributed each Monday by the San | 
Francisco Chamber Aviation Depart- 
ment to members of the committee 
and all others interested in aviation 
matters. 

According to Kenneth R. Mac- 
Donald, manager, Chamber's Avi- 
ation Department, purpose of the 
newsletter is to serve members 
of the Aviation Committee and 
others interested in the field by 
presenting the highlights of legis- 
lation, new developments, statis- 
tical surveys, and all other mat- 
ters affecting or pertaining to avi-' 
ation. 



Thursday, October 26, 1944 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Join Fight Against $60 at 60, Urges Chairman 



Junior C of C's Plan Exposition 
Manufacturing, Industry Here 

A dramatic presentation of Bay 
Area unity is developing in the plans 
of the San Francisco Junior Chamber 
of Commerce for a huge industrial and 
manufacturing exposition to be held 
in the Civic Auditorium. March 10 to 
18. 1945, according to an announce- 
ment by Thomas P. Ludcke, General 
Chairman of the exposition. 



Small Business Wants 
Freedom, Says Krug 

San Francisco Chamber members 
who recently participated in a poll on 
"government and small business" 
will be interested in a statement made 
by J. A. Krug, War Production Board 
Chairman, in a letter to Senator 
James E. Murray, chairman, Senate 
Small Business Committee, according 
to the Chamber's Industrial Depart- 
ment. 

The letter, in part, says: "The 
small business man does not need 
or want government management 
of his business; he wants freedom 
from red tape and a fair oppor- 
tunity to exercise his individual 
initiative, which, by the way, ex- 
plains in no small part the amaz- 
ing development of America." 



Mining Industry Loans 
Sought by Chamber 
From Federal RFC 

On recommendation of the Mining 
Committee, the San Francisco Cham- 
ber's Board of Directors has author- 
ized steps to secure support for Senate 
Bill 200(1 with a minor amendment. 

• RFC Loans — This bill was intro- 
duced by Senators Murray of Mon- 
tana, Hayden of Arizona and Scrug- 
ham of Nevada to authorize the Re- 
construction Finance Corporation to 
make loans for mining purposes, par- 
ticularlv in solution of problems 
created" by YYPB order L-208 which 
closed the gold mines. 

• Amendment sought is to include 
"maintenance" in list of purposes for 
loans. 

The Chamber will seek support 
of the bill by all members of 
Congress from the western states. 



James B. Black Appointment 

James B. Black, of San Francisco, 
recently elected to the Board of Di- 
rectors of U. S. Steel Corporation, is 
the first Pacific Coast man to become 
a director of the steel corporation, ac- 
cording to Irving S. Olds, chairman 
of the Board. 

Black is president of the Pacific 
Gas and Electric Company. 



Bay Area 1945 Housing Opportunities 

By R. B. KOEBER, Manager, Research Deportment, Son Fconciico Chamber of Commerce 

A readymade market in the Bay Area for 125,000 new private dwelling 
units costing approximately S500,000,000 should exist at the end of the 
current year, based on the population trend and the relation between hous- 
ing and population in this area in 1940. 

At that time with 1,734,308 people and 587,507 dwelling units, there was one dwelling 
unit for every 2.95 persons in this area. By the end of 1944 the population of this area should 
reach about 2,300.000 people including resident civilians and those now away in the armed 
services whose homes are here. Thus, to house these people under the same conditions as 
existed in 1940, 780,000 dwelling units will be necessary. However, the total permanent 
dwelling units within this area at the end of this year will not exceed 655.000 if all units now 
authorized by the National Housing Agency's present program are completed by the end of 
the year. 

Commencing with 587,507 dwelling units on April 1, 1940, in the Nine Bay Counties 
and disregarding any demolitions, 6S,000 permanent dwelling units should be completed up 
to the end of this year. Of these about 29,000 units were built between April 1940 and Sep- 
tember 1941. In addition, about 33,000 private units will have been authorized and about 
6,000 permanent public units, making the total of 655.000 by the end of the current year. 

Public war housing program in the Bay Area under NHA will have provided some 58.000 
dwelling units at the end of the present program. All of these units, with the exception of 
6,000, are temporary' units. The progressive demolition and disposal of some 52,000 tempo- 
rary units will be no small undertaking and should provide additional opportunities in the 
construction field. 

The annual prewar residential construction trend in this area ranged from 7,000 family 
accommodations in 1937 to nearly 18,000 during 1941. During this five-year period a total of 
about 60,000 accommodations were provided in the Bay Area. The single-familv type "i 
dwelling ranged from 85 per .cut oi the total in 1937 t,. 90.3 per tent in 1941 with the five- 
year average at 87 per cent. San Francisco and Oakland accounted for slightly more than 
one-third of the total family accommodations provided in the Nine Bay Counties during 1940 
and 1941 when private building was at its highest level in the past decade. 



Maurice E. Harrison, chairman. 
Citizens Committee against Proposi- 
tion No. 11, today urged every busi- 
ness and civic organization and every 
voter familiar with the economic un- 
soundness of the S60 at 60 proposi- 
tion to assist in broadcasting the 
perils contained in this measure. 

"Proposition No. 11, a serious 
threat at the November election, 
would not only add a three per 
cent gross income tax to every 
worker, but would actually triple 
the amount of money which the 
state of California must raise an- 
nually," Falk pointed out. 
• Basis for this statement is found 
in figures supplied by proponents of 
the measure which set S576,O00,0OO 
as the minimum amount that must be 
raised by the tax to supply an esti- 
mated number of 800,000 persons in 
the state with S60 a month apiece. 

This sum of more than a half bil- 
lion dollars is over and above the 
S275, 000,000 now raised and spent 
annually by the state for all purposes 
including support of schools and sub- 
ventions to local governments. 



Investment or Purchase of 

Refrigeration Business Sought 

An inquirer having a number of 
years' experience operating a large 
commercial refrigeration business in 
another city of the Coast and who 
desires to enter the commercial re- 
frigeration field in San Francisco has 
recently contacted the Chamber. He 
is interested either in buying out or 
entering into a partnership with the 
operator of an established concern. 

Further information can be ob- 
tained from the Domestic Trade 
Department. 



Mineral Output 

California mineral production for 
1943 aggregated S426.445. 280. an in- 
crease of $17,706,846 over the 1942 
total of $405,738,434, according to a 
report received by the Chamber's 
Industrial Department from Walter 
W. Bradley, State Mineralogist. 

Gold Production was $5,191,480 
— the smallest since 1848. 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Thursday, October 26, 1944 



FOREIGN TRADE TIPS 



The Chamber cannot guarantee any firm 
or individual mentioned in Trade Tips. It is 
suggested the usual investigation be made in 
each instance. For details call World Trade 
Department, EXbrook 4511 and refer to the 
Trade Tip's number. 

l.'3553 BUSINESS IN EL SALVADOR— Carlos A. 

Salguero, business man from El Salvador, available tor 
two or three months in San Francisco to interview 
manufacturers and exporters with view to securing 
products lor representation in El Salvador. 146 Belve- 
dere Street, HE 7676, San Francisco, California. 

3554 CHEMICALS— Agencias Universales. E. Sara- 
via y Cia., Ltda.. Pasaje Aycinena 19. Altos, Guate- 
mala City. Guatemala, is interested in representing 
manufacturers of chemicals. 

3555 MEXICAN COMMODITIES— American 

Trading Company, Avenida Juarez 30, Mexico D. F., 
Mexico, for immediate shipment, offer the following 
articles: bee honey, bava beans, strawberries, crushed 
pineapple, sweet red peppers, shelled peanuts, etc. De- 
tails available at the World Trade Department 

3556 IMPORTATION FROM MEXICO— Joseph 

F. A. Otahal, Tlaxala. Tlax.. Mexico, wants to export 
blankets, "serapes," tablecloths, shawls, "rebosos," 

3557 GENERAL MERCHANDISE— Concha Fer- 
nandez y Cia.. Apartado 119. Arequipa. Peru, desire 
connections with manufacturers, importers and ex- 
porters of general merchandise. 

3558 TRADE WITH PERU— Miguel Pons, Apar- 
tado 2581, Lima, Peru, seeks representation of manu- 
facturers of steel, iron, binding materials, etc. 

3559 EXPORTATION TO PALESTINE— Nairn 

Abed. P. O. Box 1348, Tel-Aviv, Palestine, is anxious to 
import haberdashery, fountain pens, hosiery, textiles, 
chemicals, etc. 

3560 POST-WAR BUSINESS— The Palestine and 
Overseas Investment and Trustee Service, P.O. B.x 
2094. Tel-Aviv, Palestine, are making preparations for 
representations, market research, exploitation ot foreign 
patents, trustee business, etc. 

3561 GENERAL MERCHANDISE— Isaac Halevy 
S: Tzwi Wolochwiansky, 24 Jona Hanavy Street. Tel- 
Aviv, Palestine, want to represent manufacturers of 
general merchandise. 

3562 COMMODITIES TO PALESTINE— A bra- 

hamoff Brothers. P. O. Box 48. Tel-Aviv, Palestine de- 
sire to import a great variety of products, list of which 
is available at the World Trade Department. 

3563 CHEMICALS — La Voz de Armenia, Armenia, 
Caldas, Colombia, wishes to contact manufacturers "f 
chemicals. 

3564 DAINTY BASKETS FOR CANDIES— 

Phelps y Wardy, Edificio del Banco Xacional, 305 y 
306, Ciudad Juarez. Chin., Mexico, are interested in 
selling baskets for candies, cakes, etc. They also want 
to sell other articles. For further details, call at the 
World Trade Department. 

3565 SALT FROM ECUADOR— The Direccion 
General de Estancos, office of the Government of 
Ecuador, is in position to export five thousand tons of 
salt. This quantity may be increased next year. For 
further details call the Consulate General of Ecuador, 
681 Market Street. EX 6422, San Francisco, California. 

3566 CHINESE FIRECRACKERS— Kentucky 

Brokerage Company. 270 South Hannover Avenue. 
Lexington 11, Kentucky, is anxious to contact im- 
porters and brokers of Chinese firecrackers, 

3567 COMMODITIES TO PUERTO RICO— Jose 

M. Gatell. P.O. Box 1107. San Juan. Puerto Rico, is in- 
terested in securing the representation of manufacturers 
of flashlights, labels for bottles, toilet products, car- 
bide, automobile jacks, etc. 

3568 TRADE WITH SPAIN— Comercial e Indus- 
trial Vequer, Diputacion 239. 2o. 4-A. Barcelona, 
Espana. desires to get in touch with importers of 
liquors, dried fruits, etc.. and exporters of hardware, 
metals, etc. 



Garber Appointed Head 
Transportation Groups 

Del Sarber, vice president and gen- 
eral manager, Berkeley Chamber of 
Commerce, has been appointed chair- 
man of the Pacific Coast Transporta- 
tion Advisory Board's chamber of 
commerce committee, according to 
A. W. Elkinton, president of the 
Berkeley Chamber. 

• Sarber's committee, according to 
Elkinton, is designed to focus the at- 
tention of the chambers of commerce 
in California, Nevada, Arizona, and 
New Mexico on the vast railroad war- 
time transportation emergency that 
now exists. 

Jewish Community Center 

The Jewish Community Center will 
celebrate its tenth anniversary over 
the fall months with a series of special 
events, according to Robert M. Levi- 
son, chairman, General Committee of 
the anniversary. 

• Some of the events open to the 
general public will include a music 
evening, art exhibit, dance for the 
armed forces, symposium on public 
affairs, athletic night, youth activi- 
ties and symposium on Jewish prob- 
lems. 

Co-operating will be forty Jew- 
ish Communal groups through 
their representatives. 



Publi 


hed weekly at 333 Pine St., San Francisco, 


Zont 


1. County of San Francisco. California. Will 


Willis 


ms. Editor. Telephone EXbrook 4511. Sub- 




on. Fifty Cents a Vear (Included in Annual 


Dues 


. Entered as Second Class matter April 26, 


1944, 


at the Post Office at San Francisco, Cali- 


forma 


under the act of March 3, 1870. 



The San Francisco Chamber of Commerce 

333 Pins Street, San Francisco 4 
EXbrook 43 11 



DOMESTIC TRADE TIPS 



A digest of correspondence received from those 
desiring, or offering, lines of merchandise for repre- 
sentation. They are listed here as a service without 
necessarily bearing endorsement by the Chamber. 
For further details, contact the Domestic Trade 
Department, EXbrook 4511, Ext. 56. 

D-6070— S. S. HART, REBSTOCK-HART-SMITH 
CO.. 6245 South Manhattan Place. Los Angeles 44. 
California, is interested in representing manufacturers 
on a distributing basis in Southern California 

D-6071— J. P BRILL. J. P. BRILL & CO.. 1GGM-4 
Transit Tower. San Antonio. 5. Texas, will be in San 
Francisco Nov. 12th to 15th. at Sir Francis Drake- Any- 
nne wishing representation in Texas. Louisiana, New 
Mexico. Oklahoma. Colorado on items «old to furniture 
and hardware trade, or department stores, contact 
above person. 

D-6072— MYRON OBERWAGER, JULIUS LEV- 
ENSON INC.. 7 East 17th St.. New York, toy manu- 
facturing firms, interested in New York and eastern 
representative. 



C of C Representatives at 
Supervisors' Meeting 

Attending the Board of Super- 
visors meeting Monday, October 
23, was: 

Lansing W. Rothschild, 
member, San Francisco Cham- 
ber Board. 



i/Iake every advertisement • 
produced in San Francisco 
cud our Country's war effort. 




V W PUBLISHED BY THE 

SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 



Volume I 



Thursday, November 2, 1944 



Number 31 



General Business Activity 



Thumb Nail Sketch 

The Research Department 

San Francisco Chamber 

of Commerce 

• Cumulative war contracts and 

project orders for the Bay Area based 
on the August report amounted to 
$4,681. 252,000 and were S55, 855,000 
above the previous month's total. 
Supply contracts accounted for 
13,334,470,000 and represented an in- 
crease of S28, 548,000 over the July 
level. In this group, contracts for 
ships were up SJ5.826.000 to S2.682.- 
938,000, aircraft up $700,000 to $10,- 
086,000, ordnance up S667.000 to 
1121,428,000, and all others up $11,- 
355.000 to $520,018,000. 

Project orders cumulative 
through August amounted to 
$864,698,000, the same as during 
the preceding month. Facilities 
contracts through July, including 
industry and military, amounted 
to $482,0S4,000 and represented an 
increase of S27,307,000 over the 
preceding month, all of which was 
in the industry group carrying 
that total to $395,344,000. 

• Employment in the manufactur- 
ing industries in the San Francisco In- 
dustrial Area during September was 
practically the same as during August. 
In September there were 258.000 
workers reported, compared to 258,700 
in August and 293,200 in September 
last year. The durable group with 
188,500 workers was 700 below the 
preceding month, while the non- 
durable group with 69,500 was identi- 
cal to the previous month. September 
payrolls in the manufacturing indus- 
tries were off 14 percent compared to 
last September, with the 9 months' 
cumulative off 1.7 percent. While it is 
apparent that the peak of employ- 
ment in the manufacturing industries 
in the Bav Area was attained last year 
in August, the manpower needs in 
this area have not lessened due to the 



demandsin numerous military installa- 
tions which have been established in 
the Bay Area in connection with the 
war effort. 

• September average weekly earn- 
ings in the manufacturing industries 
amounted to $59.08 compared to 
S5 7.42 in August and S60.24 in Sep- 
tember last year. Average hourly 
earnings in September amounted to 
SI. 345 compared to SI. 304 in August 
and SI. 343 in September last year. 
Average hours worked per week in 
September amounted to 43.9 com- 
pared to 44 in August and 44.8 in Sep- 
tember last year. 

In the non-manufacturing indus- 
tries payrolls for September and the 
nine months' cumulative were up sub- 
stantially over the same periods last 
year. Hotels led the gains for the 
cumulative period with a 21.2 percent 
increase, followed by wholesale trade 
with 8.2 percent; laundry, cleaning, 
etc., 5.2 percent; and retail trade, 1.6 
percent. 

Bay .Area financial transactions 
for September amounted to $2,- 
109,686,000 and were only slightly 
above September last year. The 
nine months' cumulative of $18,- 
796,526,000 was 12.4 percent above 
thesimilar period last year. Freight 
car movements in the San Fran- 




cisco-Oakland switching limits 
made another new high in Sep- 
tember of 74,339 and carried the 
cumulative for the nine months' 
to 616,413 or 9.6 percent above the 
same period last year. 

• Retail sales reported by twenty 
department stores in the Bay Region 
were up 21 percent in September over 
last September, and 10 percent for the 
nine months' period. Reports for 189 
department stores in the Twelfth Dis- 
trict showed an increase of 15 percent 
during September, and nine percent 
for the cumulative period. The nine 
months' cumulative of department 
store sales in San Francisco compared 
to the same period last year were up 
11 percent; in Oakland, eight percent; 
San Jose, 11 percent; Yallejo-Napa 
area. 14 percent; Santa Rosa, 15 per- 
cent; Stockton and Sacramento both, 
eight percent; Fresno, 27 percent; and 
Central Valley sales, 12 percent. Re- 
ports from the independent retail 
stores in San Francisco for the eight 
months' revealed total sales were up 
10 percent compared to nine percent 
for all cities in the State of 100,000 or 
over. Eating and drinking places led 
with an increase of 17 percent, men's 
clothing and furnishings stores sales 
were up 16 percent, women's ready- 
to-wear 15 percent, food group 13 per- 
cent, and furniture and hardware 
stores both 11 percent. Sales of build- 
ing materials were off the greatest, 
amounting to 22 percent, and filling 
stations off eight percent. 

• Trade at wholesale on the Pacific 
Coast during the first eight months 
was up five percent above the same 
period last year. Automotive supplies 
continued to lead the field with a 25 
percent increase, followed by gro- 
ceries and foods with 13 percent, and 
meat products 10 percent. Electrical 
goods showed the sharpest decline. 
amounting to 13 percent, with plumb- 
ing supplies and building materials 
both off 10 percent. 

(Continued on col. 1, page 4) 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Thursday, November 2, 1944 



Boxcar Shortage Still Acute 
Despite Month Change in 
Cargo Demurrage Rates 

The country's "tightest boxcar sit- 
uation" since the beginning of the war 
continues despite a revision of demur- 
rage charges for one month beginning 
October 19, according to an an- 
nouncement by John Ross, Regional 
Information Director of ODT. 
• The announcement was made by 
Ross in a request to editors for aid in 
bringing the urgency of the situation 
before the general public. 

Cause of the shortage lies in the 
seasonal need for moving crops, 
plus increasingly heavy move- 
ments of Westbound military 
freight. 



Directory of Social 
Agencies Published 

An 83-page revised edition of the 
Directory of Social and Health Agen- 
cies of San Francisco has just been 
published, according to an announce- 
ment by the Community Chest. 
• A useful guide to employers, 
teachers, church, club, group or Union 
leaders in referring persons with indi- 
vidual or family problems to proper 
sources for counsel, the Directory is 
available at the Chest offices, 45 Sec- 
ond Street, San Francisco 5. 



Admiral Wright Gives Praise 
To War Job Done Here 

• Before an audience of some 300 
guests at a San Francisco Commercial 
Club and Chamber of Commerce 
luncheon Friday, Rear Admiral Carle- 
ton H. Wright, commandant 12th 
Naval District, paid tribute to San 
Francisco for having "met willingly 
every reasonable Navy request, as 
well as some that, perhaps, may have 
seemed unreasonable." 

The occasion was a salute to 
Navy Day, sponsored by the Cham- 
ber, the Commercial Club, the 
Junior Chamber, the Marine Ex- 
change, the Navy League of the 
United States. 

The program was broadcast live 
over KSFO and transcribed for later 
release over KQW. 



1,000 Firms and Unions 
Contribute to Victory 
Manpower Campaign 

The number of firms and unions 
that have contributed so far to the 
Victory Manpower Campaign in 
the Bay Area number approximately 
1,000, according to Howard O'Hagan, 
Victory Manpower Campaign Com- 
mittee. 

Owing to housing limitations 
the number of in-migrants to the 
Bay Area is severely restricted, 
the committee points out, thus 
necessitating a better utilization 
of labor already on hand. 

In gaining a more efficient use of 
labor the committee is using all avail- 
able means of advertising and pub- 
licity. 

• The campaign is entirely sup- 
ported by public subscription. Con- 
tributions should be addressed to the 
Victory Manpower Campaign Trust 
Fund, American Trust Company, 464 
California St., San Francisco, 2. 



Safety Helmet Surplus 
Offered For Sale Here 

White enamel military safety hel- 
mets to the amount of 330,000 have 
recently been declared surplus and 
offered for sale, according to an an- 
nouncement by the Regional Ofifice of 
Surplus Property, Treasury Depart- 
ment, 30 Van Ness Avenue, San Fran- 
cisco. 

Sales are to be only to whole- 
salers, distributors and other 
groups in the trade. 

Samples may be inspected at the 
Van Ness Avenue address. 



Junior Chamber Gives 
Symposium On Russia 

Two more sessions will follow the 
first of three sessions in a symposium 
on Russia which was held last Mon- 
day at a noon meeting at the Com- 
mercial Club under the sponsorship 
of the World Trade Committee of the 
Junior Chamber of Commerce. 

Principal speaker at Monday's 
session was Dr. Otto J. Maenchen 
of Mills College, who spoke on the 
political background of Russia. 

Other speakers will be heard at 
sessions to be held on November 13th 
and 27th. 



CAB Exhibit on Extension 
of Airline Routes Filed By 
Chamber for Hearing 

Designed to assist the Civil Aero- 
nautics Board in rendering a decision 
on applications of 16 airlines for new 
routes or extension of existing routes 
linking San Francisco with points in 
eight Western states, a supplementary 
exhibit has been prepared by the San 
Francisco Chamber of Commerce for 
submission at CAB hearings begin- 
ning here on November 1 on the West 
Coast case. 

Actual preparation of the ex- 
hibit was made by Kenneth 
R. MacDonald, Manager of the 
Chamber's Aviation Department. 

States in which Certificates of Con- 
venience and Necessity are sought by 
the applicants are California, Oregon, 
Washington, Idaho, Montana, Utah, 
Nevada and Arizona. 
• Airlines concerned are: Amer- ] 
ican Airlines, Inc.; Coast Aviation 
Corp.; Los Angeles Airways, Inc.;! 
Ryan School of Aeronautics; Trans- 
continental and Western Air, Inc.; 
Nevada-Pacific Airlines, Inc.; South- j 
west Airways Co. ; United Airlines, 
Inc. ; West Coast Airlines, Inc. ; West- 
ern Airlines, Inc.; Grays Harbor 
Lines; Oregon Airways, Inc.; Roy F. j 
Owen Co.; Pacific Northwest Air-] 
ways; Western Washington Airways, 
and Albert L. Zimmerly. 

The supplementary exhibit in- 
cludes statistical data designed 
to show the community of inter- 
est between San Francisco Bay 
Area and other cities throughout 
the United States. 

It is to be filed with the request | 
that it be made part of the official] 
record of the hearing. 

The hearing starts November 1 in 
room 401 at the San Francisco Audi- 
torium. 



Apparel City Acquires Site 
At Hunters Point 

Apparel City, Inc., which plans toj 
build a four million dollar garment 
center in San Francisco, has practi-j 
cally completed arrangements for pur-j 
chasing 20 acres of land at Hunter's 
Point. 

• Only five minutes from down-J 
town the new site is now occupied by 
housing units. The San Franciscol 
Housing Authority, however, has- 
promised to clear the land as early ai 
possible. 



Thursday, November 2, 1944 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



SURVEY OF BUSINESS CONDITIONS 
IN SAN FRANCISCO 



BRANCH OF ACTIVITY 



(number I 

(value) 

(number) 

(value) 

(number) 

(value) 

(number) 
(value) 

(number) 
(value) 

'mm, ben 
(value) 

(number) 

(value) 
(number) 
(amount) 

(number) 
(amount) 

Cisco (index) 

FINANCE 

Bank Debits ($000) 

Bank Clearings ($000) 



Residential, New 
Single-family Dwellings, Ne 

Norf-residential, New 
Additions. Alterations & Re 
Installations 
REAL ESTATE 



Sale: 

Mortgages & Deeds 

Releases 



Trus( 



EMPLOYMENT & PA YROLLS— Bay Area (5 Co.'s) (a) 

Employment (manutacturing) (index 

Payrolls (manufacturing) (index) 



Wholesale Trade 
Retail Trade. 
Hotels 



TRANSPORTATION 

Carloads 

S. F. Airport Traffic 

Express Shipments — I 

Air Mail Loaded 



Indus. & Com'l Gas Sales 

Water Consumers 

Tourist & Settler Inquiries 



(payrol 

(payroll) 
(payroll 



(number) 
(no. planes) 
. passengers 
(number) 
(number) 
(pounds) 



DAIRY RECEIPTS, FRUITS & VEGETABLES 

£ utter (pounds) 

Cheese (pounds) 



LIVESTOCK SLAUGHTER (b) 

Cattle 

Calves 

Sheep & Lamps 

Hogs 

S. F. LIVING COSTS 1935-39 Avg. 

Clothing 



(total number) 
number) 

(number) 



(index) 
undex. 



1,100 
9.610.707 

1.057 
8. Son. 426 



1,500,407 
1,264.120 
2,02.1.208 
416.013 
7.640,738 



31.106 
1.801 
25,764 



3,553,152 

1,524,512 

101.272 

2.3S0.15S 

2.403 

[99,954 

30.430 
17.736 
100,530 
42.25S 



These da 



; based on reports submitted to the Dh 



15,435 

250.030 

7.230 

420.570 



2.519,429 

1,573,918 

70.166 

1.435.641 

2.332 



(b) Federal Inspection — San Francisco District. 

Acknowledgment is hereby made to Thomas Magee & Sons 
Reserve Bank of San Francisco. California State Departn 
United States Departments of Labor. Agriculture, and Con 



-47.8 
-61.3 
-52.2 
60.0 



1,573.002 
1.210.880 
1.531.768 
282.590 
5.194.806 


4.4 
32.1 
47.2 
47.1 


4 
42 016 
8.084 


-25.0 

427.1 

1.954.3 


351.0 
672.3 


-12.4 
-14.0 


142.9 
135.9 
129.3 


10.4 
3.8 
5.2 



3.140 

10.036.265 

1.152 

6.752.025 



522.750 

1,345 
2.652,345 



0.956 

04,447.310 

9.452 

71.609.365 

10,568 

72.478.887 



167 



14.420.142 
10.824,042 
24.304,478 



157.2 
142.1 
130.0 



277.378 
14.162 

170,284 
2,643.383 



38.627,407 
11,550.731 
1.417,412 
20.878.431 
18.095 



2,353 

0.075.3S7 

1 .03 1 

7,786.355 

1.029 

3.117.500 

72 

299.505 

1.130 

1,877,058 

120 

11.540 

7.008 

55.003.087 
7.548 

50.804.650 
9,262 

60.627.632 

151 



12.744.231 
9.652,397 

11.787,101 
4,114.112 

58,865,375 



20 



131.3 

128.0 
152.3 

80.983 
69.357 
11.626 



256.779 
10.638 
128,384 
2.208,976 
62,657 
3.017,054 



8,392,142.000 



34.477.657 

14.807.345 

938.026 

13.447.290 

17.492 

1.695.625 
223.999 
44.640 

005,752 
431,237 



110.0 
122.5 
126.4 



; and Law Enforcement. State of California. 



I 8: Bradstreet, Inc.. local utilities, private organizations. Federal 
of Industrial Relations. Agriculture, and Employment, and the 
nd the United States Bureau of the Census. lor the basic data 



ch contributed toward this survey compiled by the Research Department, San Francisco Chamber of Co 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Thursday, November 2, 1944 



FOREIGN TRADE TIPS 



The Chamber cannot guarantee any firm 
or individual mentioned in Trade Tips. It is 
suggested the usual investigation be made in 
each instance. For details call World Trade 
Department, EXbrook 4511, and refer to the 
Trade Tip's number. 

.1569 EXPORTATION TO PUERTO RICO— John 

H. Kerr, apartado 3314, San Juan. Puerto Rico, seeks 
contact with exporters ul nee, chum salmon, sardines, 
beans, com, canned foods, etc. 

3570 BUSINESS IN EGYPT— The National Im- 
port and Export Company. Malik, i Faruda Street 23. 
Cairo. Egypt, wants to be put in touch with exporters 
of groceries, papers, shoemakers' requisites, etc. 

3571 MEN'S FURNISHINGS— Chilpa, S.A.. Hotel 
Reforma, Mexico D.F., Mexico, is interested in connec- 
tions with manufacturers of men's furnishings. 

3572 LEATHER PRODUCTS— Segismundo U. Z. 
Steinmetz. Calle Montevideo 760. Buenos Aires. Ar- 
gentina, desires to export handbags, vanities, gloves, 
fancies, etc., made of leather. 

i?"7 M\ri!!\FRV to AROFNTIN*— Rpnas, 
Rico yCia.. Calle Bolivar 388. Buenos Aires. Argentina, 
are anxious to contact exporters of machinery, tools, 
industrial chemicals, etc. 

3574 GREEN GINGER ROOT— Ernesto Cardenas 
V.. Luz Savinon S23, Colonia del Valle. Mexico D.F.. 
Mexico, wishes to sell great quantity of green ginger 

3575 GLASSWARE— C. Leitz, Apartado 1822. 
Caracas, Venezuela, desires to represent manufacturers 
of glassware. 

3576 AGENT FOR EXPORTATION— Mercaderia 

Compania of America, 48-24, 43rd Street. Woodside, 
New York, would like to appoint an agent in San Fran- 
cisco for handling export shipments to Australia. 

3577 TRADE WITH LEBANON— Alfred J. Skaff. 
P.O. Box S54, Beirut. Lebanon, is anxious to represent 
in that country manufacturers ol industrial, mechani- 
cal, electrical and chemical products. He has particular 
interest in agricultural machinery and allied articles. 

3578 PRODUCTS TO PANAMA— Roberto T. 
Iglesias, Apartado 2025. Panama, R. de Panama, is in- 
terested in importing cement, lumber, lime, galvanized 
iron sheets, hardware, etc. For details, call at the World 
Trade Department. 

3579 REPRESENTATION IN COLOMBIA— 
Gonzalo Jordan, apartado 262, Bogota. Colombia, de- 



I S a '" i 144 pieces. F.O.B. Mexico City. Sample: 
are available at tbi World Trade Department. 

3581 REPRESENTATION FROM SWEDEN 

Husqvarna YapcnUibnk- \ ]'• 1 1;:- iv.irna. Sweden 
seeks representative in the Western 1 nttedS I - 

of articles that this firm iii..nii:.i. - . :i<i " ! "< ' '1- 

tails, are available at the World Trade I >< p.tumen! 

3582 SHARK LIVER OIL -Felix Lopez Balbuena 
apartado 77'). C.uavaquil, Ecuador, is in position to <'X 
port shark liver oil containing 20,000 unit- ol vitamu 
"A" per gram. 



C of C Representatives at 
Supervisors' Meeting 

Attending the Board of Super- 
visors meeting, Monday, Octo- 
ber 30, were: 

Prentiss A. Rowe, member, 
San Francisco Chamber Board. 

"Ad Long, member, Cham- 
ber's Municipal Affairs commit- 
tee. 



Published weekly at 333 Pine St., San Francisco, 
Zone 4, County of San Francisco. California. Will 
Williams, Editor. Telephone EXbrook 4511. Sub- 
scription, Fifty Cents a Year (Included in Annual 
Dues). Entered as Second Class matter April 26. 
1944, at the Post Office at San Francisco, Cali- 
fornia, under the act of March 3, 1870. 



Junior C of C Industry 
Exposition Approved 

Complete approval of the Junior 
Chamber sponsored Bay Area Indus- 
trial and Manufacturing Exposition 
to be held in San Francisco March 10 
to 18 has been voted by the Board of 
Directors of the Berkeley Chamber of 
Commerce, according to A. W. Elk- 
inton, president. 

Under the leadership of the San 
Francisco Junior Chamber, ten 
Junior Chamber groups around 
the Bay are laying plans for the 
exposition whose purpose is to dis- 
play to Bay Area citizens the pro- 
posed postwar products which 
local iivdtistry will place on tv>p 
market. 



Chamber Managers to Attend 
Postwar Meet In Sacramento 

Plans for reconversion, postwar 
jobs, and more effective means for 
civilian aid in prosecution of the war 
against Japan will be chief topics of 
discussion at the 3rd War Conference 
of the California Association of Cham- 
ber of Commerce Managers to be held 
in Sacramento February 7, 8 and 9, 
according to C. P. Tanner of the Do- 
mestic Trade Department, who has 
been named chairman of the Com- 
mittee on Attendance. 

Invitations to attend the Con- 
ference have been issued by Ste- 
phen Paxton, Assistant Manager 
of the Sacramento Chamber. 
• John Rooks, President and Man- 
ager of the Alameda Chamber, is in 
charge of commit tee appointments. 



The San Francisco Chamber of Commerce 



333 Pine Street, 
EXbrook 4511 



Francisco 4 



Business Activity 

(Continued from page 1) 

• General business activity in San 

Francisco during September con- j 
tinued the seasonal trend with a slight 
gain over the previous month. Our in- 
dex at 186.3 was 2.5 percent over Aug- 
ust and 7.5 percent over last Septem- 
ber. The nine months' average at 
180.7 was 12.4 percent above the 
same period last year. 

• Strong gains in San Francisco 
major activities for the nine months' 
cumulative compared to last year de- 
veloped in real estate sales which were 
up 71.7 percent; bank debits, 13.2 per- 
cent; postal receipts, 106.2 percent; 
air mail loaded, 22 percent; stock ex- 
change transactions, 25.2 percent; in- 
dustrial placements, 43.2 percent; air 
traffic, planes, 33.1 percent, and pas- 
sengers 39.6 percent ; freight car move- 
ments, eight percent; livestock re- j 
ceipts, 12.2 percent; electrical energy 
sales, 16.1 percent; and retail sales, 
10.6 percent. 



Oakland Address 

Stuart R. Ward, author, newspa- 
perman and moderator of the "Cali- 
fornia Council Table," will address 
members of the Oakland Foreign j 
Trade and Harbor Club at a dinner 
session this evening, November 2, at | 
the Athens Athletic Club in Oakland. 



i/lahe every advertisement 
produced in San Francisco 
aid our Country's war eiiort. 





S#460£44L 



PUBLISHED BY THE 

SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 



Volume 



Thursday, November 9, 1944 



Number 32 



WASHINGTON NOTES 



• Office of Civilian Require- 
ments — An order outlining the or- 
ganization and functions of the Office 
of Civilian Requirements has been 
announced by the War Production 
Board. This order formalizes the func- 
tions of the office in addition to those 
established heretofore. According to 
J. A. Krug, WPB Chairman, "The 
Office of Civilian Requirements will 
be on the alert to watch developments 
in the civilian supplies that support 
an effective war effort." 

OCR representatives in the re- 
gional offices recently were called 
in to Washington and briefed on 
the task that lies ahead of them, 
and they will play an important 
part in the coming period. Located 
in important centers throughout 
the country, these men will be 
able to see any trouble as it de- 
velops and assist in dealing with 
it on the spot. Russell W. Long- 
streth is the representative of 
OCR in San Francisco. 

• Automobile Rationing — The 
quota of new passenger cars available 
for rationing in November in Region 
VIII of the Office of Price Adminis- 
tration (California, Oregon, Washing- 
ton, Nevada, Arizona, and the north- 
ern part of Idaho) is 406, with a 
regional reserve of 41. The national 
total quota and reserves amounts to 
3,600. According to OPA the stock- 
pile for rationing is now under 20,000, 
less than a normal pre-war two-day 
supply. 

• Aircraft Production — For the first 
time, the War Production Board has 
released detailed figures on aircraft 
output by type, from Julv 1, 1940, to 
September 30, 1944. 

The figures are as follows: 

Bombers 74.95.! 

Fighters 70.627 

Transports 17,592 

Naval Reconnaissances 2.345 

Trainers 54,642 

Communications 10,785 

Special purpose 1 ,459 

Total 232,403 

From the Chamber's Washington Office. 



French Supply Mission 
Interested in S. F. Bay 
Region Manufactures 

With a view to rehabilitation of 
France, I. Leviant, chief. Industrial 
Divisions, Supply Mission for France, 
has evinced interest to the Chamber's 
Industrial Department through his 
contact with the Chamber's Washing- 
ton office in Bay Region manufac- 
tures. 

While Leviant is being provided 
general information concerning 
bay area manufacturers, San 
Francisco producers of the items 
listed below, who may be inter- 
ested in potential business with 
the French, should communicate 
directly with Leviant, 1800 Massa- 
chusetts Avenue, N.W., Washing- 
ton 6, D.C., advising the Cham- 
ber's Washington Office or Indus- 
trial Department of their action. 

• Items wanted — Tugs, barges, 
lighters, dredges; diesel engines, ma- 
rine anchors and chains; rope and 
rope products; fishing equipment; 
tarpaulins; prefabricated houses of 
wood and steel; paving plants; hoists, 
cars and other mining equipment ; and 
wide varieties of industrial and elec- 
trical supplies. 



Retail Merchants Group Elects 
Officers; Re-elects Lenehan 

At the Annual Meeting of the Re- 
tail Merchants Association of San 
Francisco held in the Hotel St. Fran- 
cis, November 6, 1944, Thos. J. Lene- 
han, secretary-treasurer, Seymour 
Drug Co., was re-elected president of 
that group. 

Walter J. Epstein, executive, The 
Emporium, was elected 1st vice presi- 
dent; Melville P. Meyer, manager, 
Nathan Dohrmann Co., was elected 
2nd vice president, and David P. 
Street, San Francisco Chamber of 
Commerce, was elected managing 
director. 



New Produce Terminal 
Plans for San Francisco 
Revealed by Corporation 

Plans for a new wholesale produce 
market for San Francisco were re- 
vealed last week by the San Fran- 
cisco Wholesale Produce Terminal 
Corporation at a press conference fol- 
lowed by a meeting of the Wholesale 
Fruit and Produce Dealers Associa- 
tion in the San Francisco Chamber of 
j Commerce building. 

C. A. Maggini, president; Gas- 
ton Goetting and Albert Jacobs, 
directors of the Corporation, at- 
tended the conference to present 
the plans, which included an ar- 
chitect's sketch of the project as 
drawn by Timothy Pflueger. 

• Complete approval of the pro- 
posed project has been voted by the di- 
rectors and members of the Wholesale 
Fruit and Produce Dealers Association. 

Ray B. Wiser, president, Cali- 
fornia Farm Bureau Federation, 
and chairman, San Francisco 
Chamber Produce Market Sub- 
committee of the Agricultural 
Committee, expressed himself as 
tremendously pleased with the 
progress which the Wholesale Pro- 
duce Terminal Corporation has 
made on this project which has 
been a primary interest of the 
Sub-Committee for nearly 3 years. 

• Officers and directors of the new 
project are: C. A. Maggini, president; 
Paul Meyerhoff, vice president; Jo- 
seph Peirano, treasurer; and Albert 
H. Jacobs, Joseph Hunt, George Lago- 
marsino, George Ivancovich, Douglas 
Dorn, directors. 



i /Jake every advertisement • 
produced in San Francisco 
aid oar Country's war effort. " 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Thursday, November 9, 1944 



Grady Chosen as One of Six 
Delegates to International Meet 



New Federal Directory 
Available Now at 
S. F. Chamber Office 

Copies of a revised directory of 326 
Federal Offices in San Francisco and 
the San Francisco Bay Area, pub- 
lished by the San Francisco Chamber, 
are now available at the Domestic 
Trade Department. 
• The directory contains informa- 
tion on 110 offices and facilities of the 
armed forces, and of the total of 326 
offices, at least 172 are regional in 
character. 



Oakland Traffic Manager East 
to Confer on Bay Area Matters 

Eugene A. Read, manager, Traffic 
Department, Oakland Chamber of 
Commerce, is now on the East Coast 
for a series of consultations and meet- 
ings on matters affecting the Oakland 
Area. 

• In Washington, D. C, Read 
planned to confer with representa- 
tives of the Interstate Commerce 
Commission and U. S. Maritime Com- 
mission on matters of interest to the 
San Francisco Bay Area. 

A member of the executive com- 
mittee of the National Industrial 
Traffic League, Manager Read 
will attend a meeting of the 
League in New York City, Novem- 
ber 16-17. 



Emeryville In-Plant 
Feeding Studied 

Improved in-plant feeding facilities 
for Emeryville factory workers are the 
object of a survey now being made by 
the Industrial Feeding Section of the 
War Food Administration for the 
Emeryville Industries Association, 
according to the Chamber's Industrial 
Department. 

Such surveys are only one phase 
of the services which are available 
to Bay Area manufacturers 
through James C. Hobart, Acting 
Chief, Industrial Feeding Section, 
Office of Distribution, War Food 
Administration, Room 700, 821 
Market Street, EX 8381, from 
whom plant managers may re- 
quest co-operation. 



Henry F. Grady, president, Ameri- 
can President Lines and first vice- 
president, San Francisco Chamber, 
has been selected as one of six Ameri- 
can delegates to the International 
Business Conference at Rye, New 
York, November 10 to 18, at which 
business men from at least 34 nations 
will be represented. 
• Purpose of the conference is to 
provide a forum for business men from 
the United States, Allied and neutral 
nations to formulate plans for postwar 
foreign trade development. 

Grady and the five other Amer- 
ican delegates were appointed by 
presidents of the four sponsoring 
organizations — United States 
Chamber of Commerce; National 
Association of Manufacturers; 
National Foreign Trade Council; 
and International Chamber, 
American section. 



CAB Hearing Continues 
On West Coast Case 

The West Coast Hearing by the 
Civil Aeronautic Board, which started 
November 1, continues, with four air- 
lines' cases completed by the end of 
last week. 

Hearings are held in Room 401, 
Civic Auditorium, beginning at 
10:00 a.m. and concluding at 
5:00 p.m. 

• Cases remaining to be heard are : 
Transcontinental & Western Air, Inc. ; 
Southwest Airways Company, West 
Coast Airlines, Inc. ; Western Airlines, 
Inc.; United Airlines, Inc.; Nevada- 
Pacific Airlines, Inc.; Northwest Air- 
lines, Inc.; Roy F. Owen Company; 
Western Washington Airways; and 
Albert L. Zimmerlv. 



California Chambers Endorse 
S. F. World Trade Center Plan 

A total of twenty chambers of com- 
merce in the San Francisco Bay Area 
and adjacent regions have endorsed 
the San Francisco World Trade Cen- 
ter project, according to M. A. Cremer, 
secretary, World Trade Center, Inc. 

Most recent was the Sacramento 
Chamber which described the 
World Trade Center in its en- 
dorsement as one which "will 
provide facilities for international 
trading in one compact area and 
greatly augment the volume of 
trade, including factories in the 
San Francisco area." 



San Francisco Area 
Revealed as West's 
Most Compact Market 

The San Francisco metropolitan 
area contains one of the most compact 
markets west of the Mississippi River, 
according to a study of the Research 
Department of the San Francisco 
Chamber. 

• Population Distribution — Based on a 
study of recent population distribution, it was 
found that 82 per cent of the nine counties' 
population lived in 54 incorporated cities 
within a 50 mile radius of San Francisco. 

• Average density of population within 
these cities has risen to 7,646 persons per 
square mile from 5,609 in 1940, or an increase 
of 36 per cent. 

The 54 incorporated cities, with a combined 
area of 256.6 square miles, contain a total 
population of 1 .962,034 according to the 
latest reports available, or an increase of 
522,798 ever the 1940 Census. 

• Two-thirds of the entire population in 
the nine counties live within a single compact 
area comprising eleven contiguous central 
cities (San Francisco, Daly City, Oakland, 
Alameda, Emeryville, Piedmont, Berkeley, 
Albany, Ei Cerrito, Richmond, and San 
Leandro), and embracing 138 square miles of 
land and 1,505.535 people. 

This same area, a little less than one- 
third the size of the corporate city limits 
of Los Angeles, now contains more people 
than were living in that city in 1940. 
Average number of persons per square 
mile within this compact area has risen 
to 10,910 compared to an average of 
8,236 in 1940, while the average number 
of persons in all the central cities of 
some 140 metropolitan areas in the 
nation amounted to 7,813 per square 
mile in 1940. 

• San Francisco— During the same period, 
population per square mile of San Francisco 
has risen to 17,636 from 14,227 in 1940. Only 
three other cities in the nation had more 
people per square mile in 1940 than San 
Francisco now has. They were: New York, 
24,933; Jersey Citv, 21,061; and Newark, 
18,210. 

Anyone desiring a tabulation of 
the 54 incorporated cities within 
a 50-mile radius of San Francisco 
showing population, area, and 
density should get in touch with 
the Research Department, San 
Francisco Chamber. 



Berkeley Postwar Expansion 

In a statement urging all Berke- 
leyans to get ready for postwar busi- 
ness expansion, Raymond M. Young, j 
postwar chairman, Berkeley Cham- , 
ber, said, "As the Western market ex- 
pands we must seek more industries 
for this locality. We need carefully to 
select types of industry suited toi 
Berkeley. Those engaging heavily in 
research, in processing foods, or in 
highly skilled machine work are de- 
sirable for this city." 



Thursday, November 9, 1944 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



C of C 1945 Board of Directors Nominated 



Boise Chamber Manager Here 
on Mail Route Change 

In an effort to get more direct mail 
service from San Francisco to Boise, 
Idaho, E. G. Harlan, manager, Boise 
Chamber of Commerce, was in San 
Francisco last week conferring with 
Post Office officials on possibilities of 
obtaining a mail contract for Boise- 
W'innemucca stages. 

Harlan, who is a guest member, 
San Francisco Chamber of Com- 
merce, established headquarters 
at the chamber during his visit. 



Lundborg To Be Guest 
of Honor at Hi-Jinx 

Louis B. Lundborg, general man- 
ager, San Francisco Chamber of Com- 
merce, will be guest of honor and 
principal speaker at the annual Hi- 
Jinx sponsored by the Mission Street 
Merchants Association to be held 
November 16 at the Masonic Temple. 

He will point to the growing unity 
between all districts in the city, and 
discuss ways in which all can work 
together for the building of a greater 
San Francisco. 



BAY AREA RECONVERSIONS LIST 



Following is a compilation of authorized reconversions to civilian goods 
manufacture in Northern California, made available today by the Domestic 
Trade Department of the San Francisco Chamber. 



Sterling Bedding Co.. 410 Divisadero. box springs. 

inner spring mattresses 
Justin M. Jacobs. Hobart Bldg., electrical conduit & 

fittings 



1731-lSth Street, box 

San Francisco Wire & Iron Works. S3 Colton, metal 

table bases 
Simon Mattress Mi'g. Co.. 1777 Yosemite. inner-spring 

mattresses & pads & additional box springs above 

previous quota 
Sleepcraft Inc.. 245 S. Van Ness, dual sleeping equip- 

Charles L. Fay. 433 Irving, assemble available parts on 
hand-trap jiggers 

Wilson Sc Jansen. 224-12th Street, inner-spring mat- 
tresses & increased production of box springs 

H. C. Wood Machine Works. 514 Bryant Street, power 
transmission equipment 

Dreamland Bedding Co.. 534 Bay Shore, inner-spring 



iner-spnng 
San Francisco Glass Co.. 5234 Mission, glass shower 



Pico Battery Mfg. Co. 741 Gough. 
batteries 

San Francisco Screw Products Co.. 755 Brannan, auto- 
matic cream separators 

D. X. ft E. Walter & Co.. 562 Mission, metal Venetian 
blinds 

Adams Specialty Co , 15 Whitney, shower drains 

Wesix Electric Heater Company. 390-lst Street, elec- 

Airrlex McRoskey" Mattress Co.. Inc., 1687 Market. 
innerspring mattresses and box springs. 

Williams-Wallace Co.. 160 Hooper, gutters, down- 
spouts and stove pipes 



• Oakland 

Garden Supply Co., Mil Mi. \rtliur Blvd.. dustpans 
2721 E. 11th Street, fishing sinkers 



• Oakland— Co Mi 

Speedmaster Ltd., 

balances 
Walter Mi'g. Co.. 2050 Livingsi 



High Street, trunk wheel 
dual sleeping equip- 



M. S. Freitas, 581-33rd Ave., lead fishing sinkers 

Cam Tool Co.. 3080 Broadway, tire tools 

O. A. Kenyon. Jr., 1639-18th Avenue, lead fishing 

sinkers & dress weights 
Bnuvnson Metal Products. 304 Foothill Blvd., shower 

stall & receptor combination 
B. P. John Furniture. 860-81st Avenue, dual sleeping 



Pacific Engineering Co., 938-23rd Ave., milking ma- 
chines, dairy & creamery pumps & pump repair 

Kleer Kleen Mfg. Co.. 1468-44th Ave., floor & wall 

r holders 

# Berkeley 

Hiller Industries. 739 Allston Way. cooking utensils 
Mary Aycock. 2320-9th Street, to assemble hitherto 

partially completed cutlery 
Imperial Engineering Co., 2356 San Pablo, playground 

equipment 
J. Jacobsen & Sons. 2389 San Pablo, fishing tackle 

# Miscellaneous Locations 

Bailey & Adams. 48 ,\. River Street. San Jose, oil 

burners 
C. O. Brose. Selma. water well casing 
Brown & Chappell Co.. 328-4th. Hollister. water well 

Pacific Sale & Machine Works. 1234 Whipple Ave.. 
Redwood City, sates & metal storage cabinets 

Hayward Non-Ferrous Foundry. P.O. Box 86. Hay- 
ward, cast aluminum trying pans 

Valley Bedding Co.. 1827 Inyo Street. Fresno, inner- 
spring mattresses & increased quota box springs 

F. J. Stevermer. Rio Vista, h^iunc sinkers 

Buckner Mfg. Co., 1615 Blackstone. Fresno, agri- 
cultural sprinklers 

Walter Wiebe, 726-4th. Hollister. pick-up grain & bale 
loader 

Fudie Machine Shop. Broadway Ave.. Live Oak. 
almond hullers 

C. H. Williams, 632-1 lth, Modesto, land leveler 

Olson Bros.. 1530 Marion, Kingsburg. traction 

John S. Thompson. 895 Melville Ave.. Palo Alto, indoor 

clothes dryer 
Oandin Motor Co.. San Luis & Monterey Sts.. 

Salinas, crop thinning machinery' 
Clark Bros. Motor Transport System. Watson vi He. 

spare wheel tire carrier for heavy trucks, etc. 
Victor Benson. R.F.D. No. 2. Box 353. Oak Ave.. 

Mountain View, outdoor grills 
Lobdell & Johnson Spinning Mfg. Co.. 1690 Arcade 

Bldg.. North Sacramento, commercial and house- 
hold cooking utensils 
Roberts & Seib, Fresno, farm trucks 
Blackwelder Iron Works. Rio Vista, agricultural 

equipment 
Marchants Faucets. 4069 Hoilis St.. Emeryville. 



The Nominating Committee of the 
San Francisco Chamber of Commerce, 
headed by Walter A. Haas and elected 
in pursuance of the Chamber By- 
Laws, has unanimously nominated the 
following 31 as regular members of 
the Board of Directors to be voted 
upon by the membership at the Cham- 
ber's Annual Election, Tuesdav. No- 
vember 28, 1944: 

• New director nominations: 

Lew Cook, divisional manager. Safeway Stores; 
Kenneth Dawson, vice president, Panama 
Pacific Lines; Elmer G. Johnson, managing 
director, San Francisco Chapter, National 
Safety Council; Clifton H. Kroll, senior part- 
ner. Atkins Kroll & Company; Andrew J. 
Lynch, president, Cosgrove & Co., Inc.; 
Julius Marx, vice president, Haas Bros.; Frank 
K. Runyan, president. Western Furniture 
Mart: and Clarence M. Young, Pan Amer- 
ican World Airways. 

# Director renominations: 

Herbert V. Alward, vice president, The Bank 
of California. X. A.; J. F. Barrett, partner, 
Barrett Ov. Hilp; Ralph R. Brunton. president, 
Radio Station KQW; Chas. A. Dostal, vice 
president. Westinghouse Electric & Mfg. 
Co.; Carl J. Eastman, vice president and 
Pacific Coast manager. X. \\ . Aver & Son, 
Inc.; Frank Edwards, president, Frank Ed- 
wards Company; Henry F. Grady, president, 
American President Lines, Ltd.; George H. 
Jess, vice president, Pacific Telephone & 
Telegraph Company; Earl Lee Kelly, vice 
president. Bank of America National Trust 
& Savings Association; John M. Kennedy, 
president. Kennedy-ten Bosch Company; 
Harold W. Kilpatrick, president, Kilpatrick's 
San Francisco Bakery; P. Tremain Loud, 
manager, Hotel Californian; E. J. McClana- 
han, vice president in charge of domestic 
marketing. Standard Oil Company of Cali- 
fornia; Alfred H. Meyer, president, Leo J. 
Meyberg Company, Inc.; John E. Pickett, 
editor, Pacific Rural Press: W. Lansing 
Rothschild, president, Yellow Cab Company; 
Prentiss A. Rowe. president, A. I. Hall & 
Son, Inc.; Donald J. Russell, vice president, 
Southern Pacific Company; Karl F. Schuster, 
president. Acme Breweries: B. Y. Sturdivant, 
division manager, Fox West Coast Theatres; 
Roland Tognazzini, president, Union Sugar 
Company; Brayton Wilbur, president, Wil- 
bur-Ellis Company; G. L. Williams, manager, 
J. C. Penney Company. 



Businesses Wanted Listed By 
C of C Industrial Department 

Persons familiar with such oppor- 
tunities as indicated below are invited 
to communicate with the Chamber's 
Industrial Department — EXbrook 
4511: 

• Merchandising — (Case No. 6): 
Experienced business man seeks part 
or full ownership of established mer- 
chandising enterprise having a net 
worth of from S20.000 to S40.000. 

• Fish Plant (CaseNo 7 : Eastern 
capital seeks acquisition of Bay Area 
fish reduction or canning plant. 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Thursday, November 9, 1944 



FOREIGN TRADE TIPS 



The Chamber cannot guarantee any firm 
or individual mentioned in TRADE TIPS. 
It is suggested the usual investigation be 
made in each instance. For details call World 
Trade Department, EXbrook 4511, and refer 
.to the Trade Tip's number. 

3583 REPRESENTATION IN COLOMBIA— 

Agendas Union-America, apartado 723. Barranqmlla. 
Colombia, desires to represent manufacturers or ex- 
porters in that country. 

3584 PRODUCTS FROM CHILE— Martin Duran 
R.. Agustinas 972. Santiago. Chile, wishes to export 
agricultural products, liquors and liqueurs. 

3585 BUSINESS IN SOUTH AFRICA— R. Castle- 
ton & Co.. P.O. Box 1641. Johannesburg. South Africa, 
is anxious to obtain the representation of manufac- 
turers of articles, list of which is available at the World 
Trade Department. 

3586 POST-WAR MARKETS— The Raylee Com- 
pany, Sixty Wall Tower. 70 Pine Street. New \ <»rk 5. 
N.Y., through its offices in many parts of the world, 
wishes to represent San Francisco firms to develop 
export markets. 

3587 ESSENTIAL OILS— Casimiro Polledo S.A.. 
2930.34 Alsina, Buenos Aires. Argentina, desire to 
export essential oils. 

3588 TRADE WITH CUBA— Manuel Ponton, 
apartado 707, La Habana, Cuba, wants connections 
with manufacturers of foodstuffs, lumber, steel prod- 
ucts, machinery, etc.. for their representation in Cuba. 

3589 JEWELRY— Atlantis. Compania Comercial 
S.A., apartado 1117, Mexico D.F., Mexico, wants to 
contact San Francisco manufacturers of jewelry. 

3590 TRADE WITH BRITISH GUIANA— J. T. 
Harper, 98 Hadneld Street. Georgetown. Demerara, 
desires connections with manufacturers and exporters 
of several products listed with the World Trade De- 
partment. 

3591 TOMATO PASTE— C. W. Moore. 550 Beatty 
Street, Vancouver. B.C.. Canada, would be glad to get 
in touch with packers of tomato paste. 

3592 POST-WAR BUSINESS— Bureau Central de 
Renseignements, 53 Avenue de Londres, Tunis, Tu- 
nisia, wishes commercial relations with exporters of 
general merchandise for post-war business. 

3593 PRODUCTS FROM FIJI— S P. Parekh & 
Bros.. Renwick Road, P.O. Box 314 Suva, Fiji Island, 
are in position to export tortoise shell, bracelets, nude 
figures, idols, filigree jewelry, etc. 

3594 TRADE WITH INDIA— Samuel S. Perry. 535 
Mission Street. San Francisco 5, California, seeks 
manufacturers agencies for export to India of radios, 
automobile batteries, electrodes, welding plants, elec- 
trical apoliances. beer, toilet products, sewing ma- 
chines, etc. 

SPECIAL NOTICE: The Brazilian Government 
Trade Bureau. 551 Fifth Avenue New York 17. X.\ . 
has supplied the last three Brazilian Bulletins in Por- 
tuguese and English languages, which contain trade 
opportunities and other valuable trade information. 
Those interested may see these bulletins by calling 
at the World Trade Department. 



C of C Representatives at 
Supervisors' Meeting 

Attending the Board of Super- 
visors meeting Monday, Novem- 
ber 6, was: 

Karl F. Schuster, member, 
San Francisco Chamber Board. 



Published wtdtly at 333 Pine St., San Francisco, 
Zone 4, County of San Francisco, California. Will 
Williams, Editor. Telephone EXbrook 451 1. Sub- 
scription, Fifty Cents a Year (Included in Annual 
Dues). Entered as Second Class matter April 26, 
1944, at the Post Office at San Francisco, Cali- 
fornia, under the act of March 3, 1870. 



Nation's Surplus Items 
Lists, to be Available 
at Local Offices, Here 

The Chamber has received an an- 
nouncement from the Treasury De- 
partment's Office of Surplus Property, 
30 Van Ness Avenue, San Francisco, 
from which the following self-explana- 
tory excerpts are taken : 

"No longer will it be necessary for per- 
sons to contact each of the eleven regions 
of the country to determine what sur- 
pluses are available because information 
on all large quantities of goods will be 
available right 'next door' to each re- 
gional office. 

"A 'Surplus Reporter' is to be issued from 
each regional office at regular intervals. This 
will advise firms on Treasury's mailing list 
what the treasury has to sell, the area in 
which material is located and the general 
method which will be used to sell it. 

"The new system will discontinue the 
practice of automatically sending invita- 
tions to bid. In the future, those inter- 
ested will request invitations on specific 
items after they have received notice of 
what is available, 

"Present mailing lists are being completely 
revised and those on the regional mailing list 
are being sent a form to check and return for 
the information they desire." 



Bay Area Industry Expansion 

San Francisco Chamber of Com- 
merce activities to stimulate postwar 
industrial development throughout 
the Bay Region was the subject of 
two addresses delivered recently by 
G. L. Fox, manager. Industrial I )e- 
partment, San Francisco Chamber. 

Fox addressed members of the 
Redwood City Chamber of Com- 
merce at a monthly session in 
Redwood City and over 800 teach- 
ers from the schools of western 
Contra Costa County in Rich- 
mond. 



The San Francisco Chamber of Commerce 

333 Plna Street, San Francisco 4 
EXbrook 45 11 



CANCACS Honored at 
Meeting Here; Group 
Votes Change in Name 

The Central and Northern Cali- 
fornia Association of Commercial Sec- 
retaries (CANCACS) was honored at , 
a luncheon sponsored by the Board 
of Directors and Domestic Trade 
Committee of the San Francisco 
Chamber of Commerce, Friday, No- 
vember 3, in the Bohemian Club. 

Members of the association 
from throughout Central and 
Northern California attended the 
luncheon and were excorted dur- 
ing the afternoon on an inspec- 
tion tour of the U.1S. Naval Dry- 
docks at Hunters Point, arranged 
through the courtesy of Captain 
N. L. Rawlings, Officer in Charge. 

• In a business session following 
the luncheon, it was agreed by unani- J 
mous vote to change the name of the! 
organization to "Central and North- 
ern California Chamber of Commerce 
Executives," which according to Les- 
lie J. Freeman, president, would elimi- 
nate confusion. 

• By-Laws Revised — A complete re- 
vised set of by-laws, presented for the 
Sub-Committee on By-Laws by J. , 
Delbert Sarber, were adopted unani- 
mously. 

Sarber stated that in drafting 
the by-laws all of the problems in 
connection with operation of and 
proceedings within the organiza- 
tion were carefully considered. 



San Francisco, Calif. 
Permit No. 1880 





'cut ^eaiw ^>u&i*teM. 

r W PUBLISHED BY THE 

SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 



Volume I 



Thursday, November 16, 1944 



Number 33 



Chambers of Commerce Meet Here 



In appreciation of cordial relations between 
the Central and Northern California Associ- 
ation of Commercial Secretaries (CANCA 
CS) and the San Francisco Chamber of Com- 
merce, the Board of Directors and Domestic 
Trade Committee of the Chamber were hosts 
at a luncheon for the group at the Bohemian 
Club, San Francisco. 



• Following the luncheon, members of 
the association were taken on a conducted 
tour of U. S. Naval Drvdoclcs at Hunters 
Point, arranged through the courtesy of Capt. 
N. L. Rawlings, Officer in Charge. 

The association also held a brief busi- 
ness meeting after the luncheon, with 
President Leslie Freeman presiding. 








1 | 

-fci'fc f I 1 ' 



LEFT starting with Chairman Towne: Leslie J Freeman, President. CANCACS, and General Manager, San Leandro 
Chamber of Commerce: Adnen J. Falk, President, San Francisco Chamber of Commerce, and Vice-president and General 
Manager. S S: W Fine Foods, Inc ; James Mussatti. California State Chamber of Commerce; Emory Gay Hoffman. Kern 
County Chamber; Bud Tanner. San Francisco Chamber; H, R. Basford. H. R. Basford Company; Frank K. Runyan. 
Western Merchandise Mart; P. P. Woodbridge. Liyermore Chamber; Frank Edwards. Frank Edwards Automotive Seryice 
Co.; Walter F. Stevens, Foster Jt Kleiser Co.: Frank McKee. California State Chamber: Fred C. Tatton. California State 
Chamber; Harvey Hancock. United A,r Lines; Henry Misselwitz, San Mateo Chamber; Earl Leonard, Oakland Chamber; 
Jack H. Behrens. Napa Chamber; Craig Cunningham, Madera County Chamber; Franklin Lowney. Watsonville Chamber; 
R. L Kimmel, Modesto Chamber; E A. Breckenfeld. Schwabacher-Frey Co.: Glen B. Eastburn, Los Angeles Chamber; 
J. Delbert Sarber. Berkeley Chamber; Howard Sipe, Oakland Chamber; Russell E. Pettit. San Jose Chamber. 
RIGHT of Chairman Towne: John Rooks. President. California Association of Chamber of Commerce Managers, and 
General Manager. Alameda Chamber: Louis B. Lundborg. General Manager. San Francisco Chamber; E. G. Harlan. 
Boise. Idaho. Chamber; C. J. S. Williamson. California State Chamber; George D. Gavin. Tide Water Associated Oil 
Co.: H. E. Dike, Manteca Chamber; B. J. Nordstrand. Mullen Mfg. Co : E. W. Butler. Redwood City Chamber: Wil- 
liam Stretch. Tracy Chamber; Stan Natcher. Standard Oil Co. of California; George Edwards. Los Gatos Chamber; 
Julius Mar«, Haas Bros.; Herbert Alward. Bank of California; Russell rijorn. Stockton Chamber; J. Howard Williams. 
Porterville Chamber. Sherwood Coffin. Coffin Redingron Co ; Marion Partmann. San Francisco Chamber; Harold Weber 
Oakland Chamber; Gertrude Jessup. Woodland; Lloyd Graybiel. American Trust Co.; Mrs. lone Booth. Contra Costa 
County Chamber; Will Williams, San Francisco Chamber; L. Van Tongeren, Martinez Chamber. 



Policy on 1945 Farm 
Labor Procurement To 
Be Same as 1944 

Farm Labor procurement policy for 1945 
will be similar Co that applied in 1943 and 
1944, according to information just received 
from the Washington Office of the San 
Francisco Chamber of Commerce and an- 
nounced by John E. Pickett, chairman, Cham- 
ber's Agriculture Committee. 

Frank E. Marsh, manager, Washing- 
ton Office, received this assurance from 
General Philip Bruton, Office of Labor, 
Department of Agriculture, after con- 
ferring with him on a resolution adopted 
by the California Farm Production 
Council and endorsed by the Chamber's 
Agricultural Committee urging that the 
Department of Agriculture use the same 
policy as before. 

• Order of procurement will be ( 1 ) Do- 
mestic Help, (2) Mexican Nationals, (3) 
German Prisoners of War. 



Uniform Termination 
Regulation Announced 
by Army and Navy 

The Army and Navy have settled upon a 
new regulation which makes uniform for both 
Services, the procedures under which war con- 
tracts will he terminated and settled. 

Known as the "Joint Termination 
Regulation," it will supersede the Army's 
Procurement Regulation 15 and takes 
the place of previous Navy directives 
concerning the subject. Emphasis is 
placed upon negotiation as the means 
for settlement. 

• Copies of the Joint Termination Regula- 
tion are being sent to war contractors through- 
out the nation. Contractors who do not receive 
it and other directly related activities, such 
as banks, lawyers, and accountants, may re- 
quest copies from the Joint Termination Reg- 
ulation Distribution Office, Sixth Floor, 90 
Church Street, New York City 7, New York. 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Thursday, November 16, 1944 



Harrison Comments on Defeat 
of State Proposition No. 11 



Nationwide Interest 
Evinced in Booklet by 
Chamber Manager 

According to a report from the American 
Council on Public Relations, there have been 
so many requests for copies of "Public Rela- 
tions and the Community," pamphlet written 
by Louis B. Lundborg, general manager, San 
Francisco Chamber, that the Council has or- 
dered five thousand more copies. 

The council also reported that re- 
quests have been coming in from all 
over the nation for the booklet. 
• "Public Relations and the Commu- 
nity" was published under the auspices of 
the Council. It contains the ideas presented 
by Lundborg at a session of a Downtown 
Evening Course presented by the Council, 
ideas which were later used in a lecture course 
of the Western Institute for Commercial and 
Trade Association Executives. 

Keynote of the booklet as presented in 
the first paragraph is set forth, "All in- 
stitutions . . . exist under sufferance of 
the public. . . . Every business and insti- 
tution must sell itself to the public, not 
occasionally, not annually, but every 
day." 



Business Wanted Listed by 
C of C Industrial Dept. 

Persons familiar with such an opportunity 
as indicated below are invited to communicate 
with the Chamber's Industrial Department — 
EXbrook4511: 

• Capital and Services (Case No. 8) :— 
Eastern capitalists, prepared to invest up to 
one million dollars with management serv- 
ices, seek controlling or total ownership of 
San Francisco manufacturing, merchandising 
or distributing concern. 



Folk Talk at Oakdale 

Adrien J. Falk, president, San Francisco 
Chamber of Commerce, was guest speaker at 
a meeting of the Oakdale Dinner Club, Do- 
rada Club, on Wednesday, November 15. 

Falk spoke on how Northern Califor- 
nia can meet its postwar problems. 



Commenting on the defeat of State Prop- 
osition No. 11 (#60 at 60) at tjie November 
7 election, Maurice Harrison, chairman, Citi- 
zens Committee Against Proposition No. 11, 
said that members of the committee were 
highly gratified by the decisive defeat of the 
measure. 

"The defeat of the proposition shows 
that the citizens of our state exercise 
intelligent judgment when well in- 
formed," Harrison stated. 

"I want to thank every member of the 
committee for a job well done." 



Air Line Promotes Bay Area 
in December Advertising 

The San Francisco Bay area and California 
as a whole are featured in a full-page, four- 
color advertisement of United Air Lines ap- 
pearing in magazines reaching approximately 
6,000,000 people in December, according to 
an United announcement. 

"The San Francisco Bay area of Cali- 
fornia in itself a bustling two-billion- 
dollar market ... a great trans-Pacific 
gateway, by steamer and air ... is only 
overnight from the Atlantic Seaboard 
by United's Mainliners," reads the ad, 
illustrated with a full-color view of the 
San Francisco Bay bridge. 

The advertisement will appear in the De- 
cember 2 issue of Saturday Evening Post, 
December 8 issue of United States News, 
December 18 issue of Newsweek, December 
23 issue of Business Week, and December 25 
issue of Time. 



October Deliveries of 
Ships Announced 

According to a report to the Industrial De- 
partment from the U. S. Maritime Commis- 
sion, 145 ships were delivered in October by 
shipyards throughout the nation. 

Fifty of the ships were provided by 
yards on the Pacific Coast, out of which 
19 were Bay Area. 

Southern California produced eight, and 
other Pacific Coast ports, 23. 
• Other yards delivered 36, and yards of 
the Great Lakes, 9. 



Industrial Hearing 
by Senate Committee 
Set for Nov. 16,17,18 

Senator Pat McCarran, Nevada, chairman 
of the Special Senate Committee on Indus- 
trial Centralization, will hold a hearing in San 
Francisco, November 16, 17, 18, for the pur- 
pose of determining Western views in regard 
to problems which will primarily influence 
postwar employment in the West. 

• Attendance — It is understood that civic 
organizations of other Western States will 
send representatives to testify at the hearing 
and that Navy Department, Department of 
Commerce, War Production Board, Depart- 
ment of the Interior and other federal agen- 
cies will be represented by top-ranking offi- 
cials from Washington, D. C. 

• Subjects which federal representatives 
will treat are expected to cover manpower — 
present and prospective — foreign trade and 
related problems. Department of the Interior 
policies, and other subjects which will govern 
the economic welfare of the West's future. 

Adrien J. Falk, president, San Fran- 
cisco Chamber, will present the Cham- 
ber's position at the hearing. 



Weekly Radio Series 
Started by NBC on 
Reconversion Effects 

Reconversion and expected development of 
automotive products when V-Day has been 
won on fighting fronts, will be discussed by 
three leaders of the industry, Saturday, 9:15 
p. m. over KPO in a weekly NBC broadcast 
planned to give Americans a picture of their 
postwar lives as they are affected by produc- 
tion of essentials. 

First program was Saturday, Novem- 
ber 11, and the second, Saturday, No- 
vember 18, will consist of a discussion of 
the future of oil by Frank W. Abrams, 
Standard Oil Co. of New Jersey; B. I. 
Graves, Tidewater Associated, and W. 
Alton Jones, Cities Service. 



Moore Dry Docks Expand 

According to information from the Central 
Labor-Management Committee announced 
by Moore Dry Dock Company, the United 
States Maritime Commission has approved 
installation of two new dry docks in Moore's 
west yard, costing approximately $5,000,000. 

The largest of the two will accommo- 
date vessels of around 18,000 tons. 



Thursday, November 16, 1944 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Western States Council Formed by C of C's 

Civic Recognition Dinner Held 
in Berkeley for Maury Read 

A civic recognition dinner was Held last 
Thursday, November 9, at the Claremont 
Hotel in Berkeley for Maurv Read, Berkeley 
realtor, who is president of the California 
Real Estate Association. 

• Sponsors of the dinner were the Berke- 
ley Chamber of Commerce, Berkelev Realty 
Board, Alameda Count)' Home Builders, 
Berkeley Iceland, Berkeley Lions Club, and 
other groups of citizens with whom Read has 
been associated in his business and civic life 
in Berkeley. 



The dinner, according to its cha 
Mark Reid, president. Berkelev Realty Board, 
provided an opportunity for the people of 
the city to congratulate Read on his recent 
election. 

"It is high time that we begin more 
concretely to honor citizens who dis- 
tinguish themselves, for those distinc- 
tions bring honor and a good name to 
Berkeley," said Reid in commenting on 
the dinner. 



Merchandise Mart 

to Hold Spring Market 

Week February 5-10 

According to an announcement by Frank 
K. Runyan, president. Western Merchandise 
Mart, the Board of Governors of the Mart 
Exhibitors Association has voted to hold 
Spring Market Week from February 5 to 10. 

"The Western Market serves buyers from 
the eleven western states," said Runvan, who 
pointed out that since 1920 the population of 
the three Pacific Coast states has more than 
doubled, and that all the western states now 
comprise over 14 million people. 

"Even four years ago, before the war 
boom," Runyan said, "the average per 
capita buying power in these eleven 
states was S664, while the average for 
the nation was S565. These figures indi- 
cated that the western market is one of 
the most profitable fields in the country 
for trade and industry expansion." 

Runyan also pointed out that serving the 
213,027 retail outlets of this region are 27,232 
established wholesale resources whose whole- 
sale trade volume has increased from a little 
less than four billion dollars in 1919 to a war- 
time peak of almost eleven billion dollars. 



S. F. Chamber Policy on Traffic 
Regulation Described in Report 

This is the third of a series of Traffic and 
Transit policies approved by the San Fran- 
cisco Chamber of Commerce on recommenda- 
tion by its Street and Highway Committee. 



Following a series of informal meetings 
from time to time between managers and offi- 
cers of chambers of commerce in the west- 
ern states, a permanent western states organi- 
zation has been formed, called the Western 
States Council. 

The series of meetings began with a 
conference sponsored by the San Fran- 
cisco Chamber of Commerce over a year 
ago in San Francisco. 

• Purpose of the council is to coordinate 
efforts of all communities in the eleven west- 
ern states on any problem common to the 
area. According to Louis B. Lundborg, gen- 
eral manager. San Francisco Chamber, cham- 
bers of commerce in the eleven western states 
will be invited to affiliate. 

• Immediate problem facing the council 
is the development and utilization of re- 
sources involved in industrialization of the 
West in the postwar era, including develop- 
ment and utilization of steel and other 
metals. 

First officers of the association have 
been elected and announced as follows: 

Christy Thomas, vice president, Seattle 
Chamber of Commerce, president; Leonard 

E. Read, general manager, Los Angeles 
Chamber of Commerce, and Gus P. Back- 
man, executive secretary, Salt Lake City 
Chamber of Commerce, vice presidents; and 

F. \\ . Mathias, managing secretary, Olym- 
pia, Washington, Chamber of Commerce, 
secretary-treasurer. 



• Recommendation: That adequate con- 
trol be instituted throughout the street circu- 
latory system, and particularly in the con- 
gested areas, by regulatory methods, includ- 
ing: 

1. Extension of one-way street system to 
include a complete grid. 

2. Progressive timing of stop-and-go sig- 
nals and prohibited parking on through traffic 
routes. 

3. Institution of self-actuated traffic sig- 
nals at strategic intersections. 

4. Strict enforcement of all traffic regula- 
tions. 

5. Election of traffic judge or judges for 
long term. 



O Statement: One of the principal jobs of traf- 
fic regulation should be to make effective use of 
the existing street circulatory system through care- 
ful management. The construction of fine streets 
and arterials, the setting back of curbs and the wid- 
ening of streets is only the first part of the job, 
which also requires that these facilities be carefully 
managed to provide maximum use. 

In the Central Business District in San Francisco 
the average vehicle is delayed approximately 40 per 
cent of its travel time. The average overall speed of 
automobile travel amounts to 16 miles per hour 
during peak hours. Street railway travel speed is 
considerably lower. 

With adequate regulatory steps and proper 
management it is entirely possible for both 
vehicular traffic and express transit units op- 
erating over one-way through-streets with pro- 
gressive timed traffic signals to average be- 
tween 20 and 25 miles per hour during the 
peak periods. This would practically double 
the travel speed of the average vehicle and 
triple the speed of street cars compared to 
present operating conditions. 

Strict enforcement of all traffic laws affecting 
moving and parked vehicles, as well as pedestrians 
and street cars, should be encouraged and receive 
the support of all civic groups. Consideration also 
should be given to the possible advantages of elect- 
ing a traffic judge or judges for a long term in con- 
trast to the temporary short-term appointments now 
made by the presiding municipal judge. 



Retailers Preparation for 
6th War Loan Drive 

The Sixth War Loan Drive will be held 
starting November 20 through December 16. 
with a quota of 8187,620,000 for San Fran- 
cisco, according to D. P. Street, managing 
director, Retail Merchants Association. 

Included in that amount is the E Bond 
quota of 531,182,000. 
• Retailers part in the Drive will be to sell 
5300 worth of bonds per employee, and mem- 
bers of the Retail Merchants Association have 
been asked to send in requisitions immedi- 
ately covering the number of insignia re- 
quired for employees who will constitute the 
Third Army for sale of bonds. 

"In the Fifth War Loan National 
Window Display Contest two San Fran- 
cisco stores won top honors," Street said 
to association members. "Let's strive to 
better that record in the Sixth War Loan 
by using all your imagination and en- 
ergy in developing original ideas." 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Thursday, November 16, 1944 



FOREIGN TRADE TIPS 



The Chamber cannot guarantee any firm 
or individual mentioned in TRADE TIPS. It 
is suggested the usual investigation be made 
in each instance. For details call World Trade 
Department, EXbrook 451 1, and refer to the 
Trade Tip's number. 

3595 CURRY AND CHUTNEY — A. Prcm-Das, 
ZZ60 St. James Street. West. Montreal, Quebec, Canada, 
desires connections with interested parties in establishing 
markets in trie United States for their brands ol currv and 



3597 BUSINESS WITH HAWAII— Nobe-Youn. 
n Company, P. O. Bo* 5464, Denver 17, Colorado, de- 
re to get in touch with wholesalers who trade with the 
[awauan Islands, who can ••indent" their products for 



3598 REPRESENTATION IN AUSTRALIA— J 
Jacobi & Co., 66 King Street. Sydney, Australia, wish to 
represent manufacturers of textiles, fancy novelty lines and 
hardware. 

3599 DARWIN FIBRE— Adelaide Chamber of Com- 
merce, Inc., Grenfell Street. Adelaide. Australia, request 
information regarding firms interested in importing Dar- 

3600 EXPORTATION TO CUBA—J. A. Roblejo 
Bello. Apartado 944. La Habana, Cuba, wants to reprc 
sent manufacturers of products list of which is available at 
the World Trade Department. 

3601 ARGENTINE COMMODITIES— Jorge J. 
Repetto. 25 de Mayo 145, Buenos Aires, Argentina, is in 
position to export Rye grass and Sudan grass seeds, pow- 
dered eggs, powdered milk, dried fruits and leathet prod- 



3603 ROSARIES— Las Artes de Mexico. Avenida 16 
de Septiembre 6-112, Mexico D. F.. Mexico, is manufac 
luring wooden rosaries and seeks markets for his products, 
ation at the World Trade 



obtain agencies of San Franci 
3605 CHILLIES— Francisco Franco. 8a y Juarei 



V. 



Chihuahua. Me 
quantity of chili and wild i 

3606 MEXICAN COMMODITIES— Gregono Ob- 
rador, Apartado 4. San Luis de La Paa. Gto.. Mexico, de- 
sires to export chill and great diversity of articles made of 

3607 REPRESENTATION IN CHINA— South 
west Steel Rolling Mills, 9901 South Alameda Street, Los 
Angeles 2, California, producers and exporters of reintorc 
ing bars, merchants bars and shapes, are seeking a repre- 
sentative in China. 

3608 REPRESENTATIVE FOR ARGENTINE 
GOODS— Atlantic International Trading Co., Apartado 
3180, Buenos Aires. Argentina, is seeking a firm to handle 
the representation of its products in the United States. 
This company manufactures leather products, textiles, linen, 
toilet and bazaar articles, etc. 

3609 FOOD PRODUCTS AND LIQUORS— F. 
Artes & Co., Apartado 4155, Santurce, Puerro Rico, are 
interested in contacting foods products and liquor producers 
and exporters. Bank references supplied. 



C of C Representatives at 
Supervisors' Meeting 

Attending the Board of Supervisors' 
meeting Monday, November 13, was: 

E. L. Turkington, member, San 
Francisco Chamber Board, and Chair- 
man, Street and Highway Committee. 



Chamber Industrial 
Manager Meets with 
Mountain States Group 

For the purpose of developing information 
in regard to manpower and reconversion prob- 
lems and to speak on industrial development, 
G. L. Fox, manager, Industrial Department, 
San Francisco Chamber of Commerce, met 
Tuesday, November 14, with the Mountain 
States Association in Denver. 

• The Mountain States Association is 
an organization representing the eight moun- 
tain states, and includes in its membership 
executives from chambers of commerce 
throughout the area. 

This meeting and San Francisco 
Chamber of Commerce participation in 
it is a reflection of the determination of 
western states business interests to co- 
ordinate their policies, activities and co- 
operation in the war effort from a re- 
gional viewpoint, there being many fac- 
tors of common interest between the 
mountain states and San Francisco, ac- 
cording to Fox. 

The Mountain States organization was fa- 
miliarized with the activities of the San 
Francisco Chamber with regard to war pro- 
duction, reconversion, mining and long-range 
industrial development. 

• Arrangements for San Francisco Cham- 
ber of Commerce participation in the meeting 
were made through Gus P. Backman, execu- 
tive secretary, Salt Lake City Chamber of 
Commerce. 



Farm Bureau Federation Meet 

The California Farm Bureau Federation 
will hold its 26th annual meeting November 
20, 21, 22, 1944, at the Memorial Audito- 
rium, Sacramento, California, according to an 
announcement by Ray B. Wiser, president. 



The San Francisco Chamber of Commerce 

333 Pine Street, San Francisco 4 
EXbrook 4511 



DOMESTIC TRADE TIPS 



A digest of correspondence received from 
those desiring, or offering, lines of merchan- 
dise for representation. They are listed here 
as a service without necessarily bearing en- 
dorsement by the Chamber. For further de- 
tails, contact the Domestic Trade Depart- 
ment, EXbrook 4511, Ext. 56. 

D-6073— A. E MacINNIS. 1114 Rust Building. Ta- 
coma 2. Washington, a sales consultant, has clients inter- 
ested in distribution of electrical appliances, equipment, 
agnculrural implements and machinery in Western Wash, 
ington and Pacific Northwest. 

D-6074— DONALD FRASER. 274 Elm Strecr, Win. 
nipeg, Manitoba. Canada, interested in representing firms 
packing tuna fish, shrimp and crabme.it not alteady repre- 
sented in Western Canada. 

D-6075— R A. SEFTON. Sefron S: Hayens. 155 
West Congress Street. Detroit 26, Michigan, wants to act 
anufacturers' agent fo: 



indu 



, olfet 



Wool Growers Group 
Meet in S. F. Today 

The Annual Business Meeting of the 
Board of Directors of the California Wool 
Growers Association will be held today, No- 
vember 16, at the Palace Hotel, San Fran- 
cisco, according to an announcement received 
from W. P. Wing, secretary. 
• Responding to a plea by Mayor Roger 
D. Lapham, City of San Francisco, urging c 
ganizations to refrain from holding conven- 
tions in busy, wartime San Francisco, the As- 
sociation called off their 84th annual conven- 
tion, originally set for November 16 and 17 
at the Palace Hotel, and substituted instead 
today's meeting of the Board. 



Published weekly 


at 333 Pi 


le St 


, San 


Fran 


CISCO 


Zones' 




San Fran 




California 


Will 


Williams, Editor 


Telephon 


EXbrook 


511 


Sub- 


scriptic 


n, Fifty Cents a Yea 


r (In 


luded 


in A 


nnual 


Dues) 


Entered a 


s Second 






April 26, 


1944. 


t the Pos 


Office al 




Franc 




Call- 


fnrnia, 


under the 


act of Ma 


ch 3. 


1870. 








r W PUBLISHED BY THE 

SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 



Volume I 



Thursday, November 23, 1944 



Number 34 



WASHINGTON NOTES 



• "A" Awards — In recognition of out- 
standing performances in the processing of 
food, the following food processing plants in 
California have earned the War Food Ad- 
ministration achievement "A" award: Camp- 
bell Products Co., Campbell; S. & W. Fine 
Foods, Inc., Redwood City; and Bercut-Rich- 
ards Packing Company, Sacramento. 

• Surplus Property — It is expected that 
the President will appoint the three-man Sur- 
plus War Property Board in the very near 
future. Certain directives have been delayed 
because the surplus property law specifically 
provides that certain decisions shall be made 
by the Board. 

According to the Department of 
Commerce, the Army has no intention 
of dumping #31,000,000 stock of Post 
Exchange merchandise on the market at 
the end of the war. Surpluses will be of- 
fered to other Exchanges, Government 
agencies, to the original seller, and what 
remains will be sold at public auction. 
© Agricultural Employment — According 
to the Department of Agriculture, the num- 
ber of persons working on farms the first of 
November is estimated at 10,690,000 or prac- 
tically the same as on the same date last year. 
As of October 31, the number of foreign 
workers employed in or available for agricul- 
tural work included 52,646 Mexican Nation- 
als, 14,305 Jamaicans, 756 Barbadians, 5,129 
Bahamians, and 1,012 Nefoundlanders. 

• War Expenditures — United States war 
expenditures amounted to #7, 447, 000, 000 in 
October, an increase of #343,000,000, or 4.8 
per cent, over expenditures in September, ac- 
cording to figures compiled by the Treasury 
Department and announced by the War Pro- 
duction Board. From July 1, 1940, through 
October 31, 1944, the U. S. Government has 
expended #229,600,000,000 for war purposes. 

From the Chamber's Washington Office. 



Christmas Committee for Service 
Men and Women Formed by C of C 



DRIVE FOR SIXTH 
WAR LOAN STARTS 

Commenting on the opening of the 
Sixth War Loan Drive. Monday, No- 
vember 20, Adrien J. Falk, president, 
San Francisco Chamber of Commerce, 
said, "Citizens of San Francisco have 
26 days to exhibit their whole-hearted 
support of the war effort and of the 
men and women in the armed services 
who are contributing so much to bring 
our country to a victorious peace." 

"San Francisco's quota is #187,- 
620,000 which includes an E bond 
quota of #31,182,000. 

"I know that most of you have been 
buying war bonds all along, but now is 
the time for doing that extra bit which 
will place San Francisco foremost 
among the cities of the nation in its 
support." 



Falk Asks Business To 
Postpone Mailings 
for Christmas Season 

San Francisco business houses were asked 
today by Adrien J. Falk, president, San Fran- 
cisco Chamber, to postpone large mailings of 
catalogues, calendars, etc. during the month 
of December in order to clear the way for 
out-of-town Christmas mail. 

The Office of Defense Transporta- 
tion, Post Office Department, and War 
Manpower Commission have issued a 
joint plea to San Franciscans to "mail 
early and conserve war manpower and 
transportation," Falk said, and citizens 
are requested to put a December 1 dead- 
line on all out-of-town Christmas mail- 
ing. 



Appointment of a Citizens' Christmas 
Committee for Servicemen and Women with 
J. W. Mailliard, Jr., president, State Board 
of Harbor Commissioners, has been an- 
nounced by Adrien J. Falk, president, San 
Francisco Chamber of Commerce. 

• Purpose of the committee is to lead a 
campaign from now until Christmas to obtain 
gift contributions from San Franciscans for 
every member of the armed services shipping 
out from San Francisco harbor and for service 
men and women patients in bay area hospitals. 

"As a jumping-off place for so many 
of our military personnel and as the 
wartime home of thousands of disabled 
servicemen and women, San Francisco 
has a responsibility which I am sure all 
of our people are eager to fulfill," Falk 
said. 

• Citizens may contribute presents 
through clubs and organizations to which 
they belong, as the committee is composed of 
100 members representing business, labor and 
civic groups, Chairman Mailliard explained. 
These groups will then see that all gifts are 
channeled through a central agency into the 
hands of service men and women on Christ- 
mas Day. 



Cattlemen's Group Meeting 
To Be Held In Fresno 

The Annual Meeting of the Board of Di- 
rectors and membership conference of the 
California Cattlemen's Association will be 
held in Fresno, December 17-18-19, 1944, 
according to an announcement by Loren C. 
Bamert, president. 



Two Special Announcements — See Inside 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Thursday, November 23, 1944 



Hearings on West Coast Case 
Completed; 12 Airlines Testify 

Civil Aeronautics Board Examiners Fran- 
cis W. Brown and F. Merritt Ruhlen have 
completed hearings on the West Coast Case, 
which ran from November 1 through No- 
vember 16, and are now en route back to 
Washington, D. C. 

• 49 Witnesses — A total of 49 witnesses 
testified in the hearing on applications of 12 
airlines and organizations seeking certificates 
to operate passenger, cargo and mail routes. 

Examiner Brown indicated that a de- 
cision would not be handed down by the 
Board for at least six months. 

On applicant's request, Roy F. Owen Co., 
Portland, Ore., application was not presented 
at the hearing, and the Board dismissed 18 
other applications prior to the beginning of 
the hearing. 



Presents for Russian 
Children Sought in 
Drive by War Relief 

A shipload of new warm clothing for Rus- 
sian war orphans is the goal of a nation-wide 
campaign to be conducted by Russian War 
Relief from December 1 1 to Christmas. 
• Northern California co-sponsors are 
the California Junior Chamber of Commerce 
and the Northern California Council of 
Churches, headed respectively by J. Roger 
Deas, San Francisco, and Rt. Rev. Sumner 
Walters, Fresno. 

Honorary chairmen are Rt. Rev. Karl 
Morgan Block, Rabbi Elliot M. Burn- 
stein and Dr. Henry F. Grady. 

Personal gift tags to be attached to gifts 
will be available in department stores and at 
local Bay Area headquarters — in San Fran- 
cisco, 360 Sutter Street; in Oakland, 3335 
Grand Avenue, and in Berkeley, 2338 Shat- 
tuck Avenue. 



Aviation Committee 

Appointment of Reginald S. Laughlin, 
member law firm of Treadwell & Laughlin, 
to the Legislative Sub-Committee of the Bay 
Area Aviation Committee was announced 
this week by Edward V. Mills, chairman, 
Aviation Committee. 

Chairman of the subcommittee is Edward 
P. McCall. 



American Hospital 
Supply Corporation 
Locates In San Francisco 



Reflecting selection of San Francisco as a 
base from which to serve the 1 1 western states 
efficiently and economically, the American 
Hospital Supply Corporation is announcing 
the opening of complete office and warehouse 
facilities at 767 Mission Street, EXbrook 
5185, according to the Chamber's Industrial 
Department. 

• Establishment of San Francisco head- 
quarters marks the culmination of negotia- 
tions over an extended period during which 
representatives of the company made careful 
studies of the Pacific Coast with a view to the 
selection of the best location from which to 
serve the area. 

The American Hospital Supply Cor- 
poration is one of the nation's largest 
producers and distributors of hospital 
equipment and supplies with headquar- 
ters in Chicago. James Kirkwood, Jr., 
who for 4!/2 years handled the com- 
pany's affairs in Washington, D. O, is 
manager of the San Francisco head- 
quarters. 

Many of the 10,000 items handled by the 
company may now be produced in the west 
through subcontracting arrangements, ac- 
cording to the Chamber's Industrial Depart- 
ment. Hospital furniture will be one of the 
first requirements and there will be needs for 
other items in stainless steel and the light 
metals. 



Glass Containers, Inc., Buys 
Site for Plant at Antioch, Calif. 

Glass Containers, Inc., has purchased 15 
acres of industrial property at Antioch, Cali- 
fornia, on which site it will construct a com- 
plete manufacturing plant for production of 
bottles and food jars, as soon as priorities can 
be cleared and equipment procured, accord- 
ing to D. H. Patterson, Jr., president. 
• Office in San Francisco — A subsidiary 
of Fibreboard Products, Inc., executive offices 
of both organizations are located in San Fran- 
cisco. 

"It is to meet the increasing demands 
of food processors in northern Cali- 
fornia that we are building the plant," 
Patterson said. 



Farmers Union Annual Meeting 

Annual meeting of membership and Board 
of Directors of Farmers Educational & Co- 
operative Union of America will be held De- 
cember 2 and 3 at Newman, California, ac- 
cording to an announcement by Vince Gar- 
rod, president. 



Folk and Bay Area C of C 
Representatives Testify 
at Industry Hearing Here 

Expressing optimism as to postwar pros- 
pects for industrial development in the San 
Francisco Bay Area, if manpower, material 
and other controls are realistically exercised 
by Federal agencies, Adrien J. Falk, presi- 
dent, San Francisco Chamber of Commerce 
testified last week before the U. S. Senate 
Special Committee to Investigate the Cen- 
tralization of Heavy Industry. 

Falk summarized the following six objec- 
tives of the San Francisco Chamber and asked 
concurrence of the committee: 

"(I) As the war permits, less government 
in business, rather than efforts to govern eco- 
nomics, including railroad rate structures and 
factory location factors, by legislation; 

"(2) A national approach to industrial develop- 
ment problems without regional discrimination; 

"(3) A uniform national contract termi- 
nation policy in order (a) that one area of 
the nation may not profit at the expense of 
another and (b) that civilian production may 
be gradually resumed as war production is 
tapered off; 

"(4) Manpower, pricing and material controls 
during reconversion that will be so simple that 
sources of long range and expanding postwar em- 
ployment will not be prevented by unrealistic 'red 
tape' from locating in California; 

"(5) The earliest possible freeing of Bay 
Area industrial building and site space, adap- 
table to factory purposes, since an impression 
prevails to the effect that the use of such space 
in some instances by governmental agencies 
is inefficient and prevents the establishment 
here of important plants by national con- 

"(6) The earliest possible revenue act readjust- 
ments which will encourage the availability of risk 
capital for indusrrial enterprises." 

Chrysler Motors Corporation 
Purchases Large Industrial Site 
at San Leandro, California 

Largest single sale of industrial property in 
the Oakland area during 1944, was revealed 
last week by the Oakland Chamber of Com- 
merce in announcing that Chrysler Motors 
Corporation of Detroit, Michigan, has pur- 
chased 40 acres of land adjacent to its exist- 
ing plant in San Leandro. 

Total purchase price for the 40 acres 
was approximately $60,000, and it will 
be used by either Chrysler Motors Parts 
Corporation or National Automotive 
Fibres, Inc., or both. 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Luncheon for Admiral Royal Eason Ingersol 
Junior Chamber Golf Tournament 



o 



Announcements Inside 



BAY REGION BUSINESS Thursday, November 23, 1944 



14th ANNUAL SAX FRANCISCO 

OPEN GOLF TOURNAMENT 

Harding Park December 1 9 2 9 3 9 4 



Watch the Nation's Greatest Golfers . . . Nelson, Wood, 

Hamilton, Dutra, McSpaden, Penna, Snead . . . and a 

hundred others . . . Vie for $14,500.00 in prize money 

in the West's Greatest Golf Classic! 

SEASON TICKET NOW *2 S0 

Until November 27th you can get a $7.00 value for ONLY 
$2.50! (Daily tickets purchased separately will total $7.00.) 
This season ticket sale CLOSES November 27th. Order now! 



Sponsored bg the San Francisco Junior Chamber of Commerce 
through the cooperation of the Rainier Brewing Compang 



FILL IN AND MAIL 

THIS 

BLANK TODAY I 



l ! 

San Francisco Junior Chamber of Commerce 
333 Pine Street, San Francisco, 4 

Gentlemen: 

Enclosed is my check in the amount of , 



for which please send me Season Tickets to the 

14th Annual San Francisco Open Golf Tournament, at 
$2.50 each. 

Na in e 



Address^ 



I I 



Thursday, November 23, 1944 BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Tacific War Leader! 

Admiral 
Royal Eason Ingersoll, u.s.N. 

COMMANDER, WESTERN SEA FRONTIER 

Deputy Chief, Naval Operations 
Deputy Commander-in-Chief, United States Fleet 



Will make his first public appearance in the Bay Area 
at Luncheon in the Commercial Club 

Thursday, November 30, 1944 

*TabIes are not reserved, but 
tickets must be purchased in 

advance. Members will be r. 

taken care of to the limit of Sponsors ; 

Toufldti U nJge"'!o 'make SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 

reservations early before SAN FRANCISCO COMMERCIAL CLUB 

ticket sales are opened to 
the general public. 



SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE . . , 

~. ox. • ^ .., At Luncheon in 

333 Pine Street, San Francisco, California 

Please reserve place(s) for me at $1.50 each at 

luncheon honoring Admiral Royal Eason Ingersoll on Thursday, Tflf* ^dfl PVci fl r"t cm 

November 30, in the San Francisco Commercial Club, at 12 noon. 

(Kindly enclose self-addressed envelope for forwarding tickets.) C^OTTI mCfClill C'lllh 

Name Thursday noon 

Firm November 30, 1944 

Check 

Enclosed Address 

Price $1.50 per plate 
$ { $1.46 plus 4c tax) 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Thursday, November 23, 1944 



FOREIGN TRADE TIPS 



The Chamber cannot guarantee any firm 
or individual mentioned in Trade Tips. It is 
suggested the usual investigation be made in 
each instance. For details call World Trade 
Department, EXbrook 451 1, and refer to the 
Trade Tip's number. 

3610 REPRESENTATION IN BRAZIL— Scares 

& Soares Ltd.. Rua Senador Felicio Dos Santos. 212. Sao 
Paulo Brazil, desire to represent manufacturers or export- 
ers in 'that country. 

3611 POST-WAR BUSINESS— R. A. Pfeifter, 250 
Pitt Street, Sydney, N.S.W., Australia, wants to contact 
manufacturers and exporters of fancy goods, leather prod- 
ucts, jewelry, etc., for their representation in the post-war 

3612 REPRESENTATIVE— James N. Sinclair, Ostra 
Hamngatan 19 b, Gothenburg. Sweden, seeks to be ap- 
pointed as a representative of any American firm in Sweden. 

3613 REPRESENTATION IN SPAIN— E. Pelli- 
cena G., apartado 214. Madrid, Espana, wishes to represent 
manufacturers of chemicals, oils, rubber products, electtical 
articles, hardware, etc., in Spain, Portugal and Morocco. 

3614 TRADE WITH CUBA — Alberto Avila h„ 
apartado 152, La Habana, Cuba, is anxious to get the tepre- 
sentation of exporters of flour, vegetables, canned goods, etc. 

3615 REPRESENTATION IN NICARAGUA — 
Julio C. Lacayo h.. apartado S02, Le6n, Nicaragua, seeks 
the representation of exporters of textiles, canned goods, 
liquors, etc. 

3616 VANILLA BEANS— William H. Hanley. apar- 
tado 889. Mexico D.F.. Mexico, is in position to export 
vanilla beans. Details ate available at the World Trade De. 
partment. 

3617 SALES AGENT — Antonio Verdes. apartado 
2344. La Habana. Cuoa, as manulactuters' sales agent, de- 
sires connections with San Francisco hems. 

3618 METAL SAFETY RAZORS — Phelps y 

Wardy. P.O. Box 71, El Paso. Texas, offer for exportation 
metal safety razors FOB. El Paso, Texas. 

3619 RUM FORMULA— Ricardo Valdcs kaguirre. 
apartauo 295, Cientuegos, Cuba, have a formula for manu- 



3620 STOCKINGS— Maria de Jesus A. de Govea, 
apartado 45, Colima. Col. Mexico, is interested in buying 
a latge quantity of rayon stockings. 

3621 FOOD PRODUCTS — Raimundo Mattos Jr., 
P. O. Box 336 and 390. Fortaleza, Ceara. North Brazil, 
want to represent exporters of food products, including 
apples, pears, gtapes and raisins. 

3622 REPRESENTATION IN URUGUAY — 
Compania Uruguaya de Inrercambio Panamencanc Monte- 
video. Uruguay, wishes to be put in touch with exporters of 



3623 DRIED FRUITS — Intra. S.A.. Villegas 21, 
Bajos. La Habana. Cuba, would like ro contact exporters of 
dried fruits and canned fish for their representation in Cuba. 

3624 CAPERS— J. Pons Bestard. Feliu 21. Palma de 
Mallorca. Balearic Islands, is in position to export any 
quantity of capers in barrels F.O.B. Barcelona. Spain. 

3625 BUSINESS IN THE PHILIPPINES — 

Wayne G. Clark. University of California '32. attorney- 
at-law. Businessman, expects to be in the vicinity of above 
in the' near future in connection with his assignment with 
the American Red Cross. Will act ,n any capacity for those 
firms interested. Addtess: A. P.O. 958 c/o Postmaster. San 
Francisco, California. 

3626 LIZARD SKINS— Casimiro Polledo S.A.C.G., 
2930-34 Alsina. Buenos Aires, Argentina, destfes to export 
tanned lizard skins in any quantity. 

3627 REPRESENTATIVE IN HAITI— Aux Pro- 
duits d'Haiti. 112 Rue Traversiere. Pott-Au-Prince. Haiti, 



3629 REPRESENTATION IN EL SALVADOR— 
Jose D. Menendez. apartado 365, San Salvador. El Salva- 
dor. wants to be put in touch with exporters and manufac 
tuters of wheat flour, oats, crystal and porcelain articles, etc 



Oakland "Work Pile" 
Totals $147 Million 
According to C of C 

Oakland's city-wide "Work Pile" survey 
has now hit the $ 147,000,000 mark, and from 
present indications it will surpass $255,000,- 
000 figure when final tabulations are recorded 
within the next three weeks, according to an 
announcement by R. H. Biggs, chairman, 
"Work Pile" Committee, of the Oakland 
Postwar Planning Committee, affiliated with 
the Oakland Chamber of Commerce. 

Acording to Biggs, many firms' plans are 
beyond the blueprint stage. In many instances, 
firms have ready cash, awaiting word from 
the government to launch their "Work Pile" 
projects. 



FOREIGN TRADE TIPS^» 



3630 REPRESENTATION IN ARGENTINA - 

Francisco Giordano. Dante Alighieri 257. San Francisc 
Oba, Argentina, desires to represent San Francisco firn 



3631 ARGENTINE COMMODITIES — Vails 

Puyol & Cia.. Avenida de Mayo 1424, Buenos Aires. Ar- 
gentina, wish connections with importers of textiles, cutlery, 
wooden products, toilet articles, etc. 

3632 IMPORTATION FROM ARGENTINA — 

Vallejos-Boidi. S.R.L.. Avenida Veles Sarsfield 1174. 
Buenos Aires, Argentina, seek buyers of a great diversity 
of Argentine products, list of which is available at the 
World Trade Department. 



i /Jake every advertisement 
produced in San Francisco 
aid oar Country's war effort. 



Still, Chairman of Public 
Relations Committee (or 
Area Aviation Group 

Appointment of Donald Still of San Fran- 
cisco, regional manager, Department of Pub- 
lic Relations, General Motors Corporation, as 
chairman of a new Public Relations Sub-Com- 
mittee of the Bay Area Aviation Committee, 
was announced yesterday by Edward V. 
Mills, committee chairman. 

Additional members of the new sub- 
committee will be announced later. 

• The new sub-committee, according to 
Kenneth R. MacDonald, manager, Cham- 
ber's Aviation Committee, will act as advisory 
counsel to the Committee 011 matters of pub- 
lic relations and will attempt to survey and 
obtain public reaction to the Aviation Com- 
mittee's proposals and reactions. 



C of C Representatives at 
Supervisors' Meeting 

Attending the Board of Supervisors 
meeting Monday, November 20, was: 

B. V. Sturdivant, member, San 
Francisco Chamber Board. 



Published weekly at 333 Pine St., San Francisco, 
Zone 4. County of San Francisco. California. Will 
Williams. Editor. Telephone EXbrook 4511. Sub- 
scription, Fifty Cents a Year (Included in Annual 
Dues). Entered as Second Class matter April 26, 
1944. at the Post Office at San Francisco, Cali- 
fornia, under the act of March 3, 1870. 



The San Francisco Chamber of Commerce 

333 Pin* Street, San Francisco 4 
EXbrook 4S 11 




* W PUBLISHED BY THE 

SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 



Volume 



Thursday, November 30, 1944 



Number 35 



Admiral Ingersoll To Speak Here Today 



WASHINGTON NOTES 



• Food Production -War Fund Ad- 
ministrator Marvin Jones in releasing 
details of the 1945 production pro- 
gram said, "The food production job 
for next year will be as important to 
the war and to the peace as it was in 
1944. Some shifts in the pattern of 
production will be needed in line with 
changing demand situations, but the 
total needs will continue to be great." 

Suggested total crop acreages 
for 1945, although smaller than 
the goals for 1944, amount to 
nearly 364 million acres, as com- 
pared with an estimated 360 mil- 
lion planted acres in 1944. 

• "T-Loan" Booklet— The Office of 
Contract Settlement has issued a 
booklet, "Termination Financing for 
War Contractors." It is a companion 
booklet to the recently issued "T- 
Loan" booklet, distributed by the 
American Bankers Association, out- 
lining for bankers the policies and 
procedures in connection with con- 
tract termination loans. Subcontrac- 
tors should request copies of these two 
booklets for their own banks. 

• Farm Population Estimates — In 

January 1944 there were 25,521,000 
persons living on farms in the United 
States, according to the estimates of 
the Bureau of Agricultural Economics. 
From a level of 30,269,000 in January 
1940, the farm population has de- 
creased in the last four vears bv 
4,748,000 persons. Half of' this de'- 
crease took place in the single year 
1942, when migration of farm people 
to war industries and entrance of farm 
men into the armed forces was 
heaviest . 

From the Chamber's Washington Office. 



San Leandro C of C 
Praised for Efforts On 
Industry Site Purchase 

Congratulations were received to- 
day by Leslie J. Freeman, secretary 
manager, San Leandro Chamber of 
Commerce, from K. T. Kellar, presi- 
dent. Chrysler Motors Corporation of 
Detroit, on completion of arrange- 
ments for purchase of 40 acres of in- 
dustrial land in San Leandro. 

"I am mindful of the very good co- 
operation the San Leandro Chamber of 
Commerce gave us in the initial setting 
up of our plant, and the continuing 
questions that have arisen in connection 
with it," Kellar said. 

The 40 acres purchased are on Davis 
street adjacent to the National Auto- 
motives Fibres. Inc. and connecting 
with the Chrysler San Leandro^Plant 
property. 

Adding his appreciations to those ex- 
tended by Kellar, J. R. Millar, president, 
National Automotive Fibres, Inc., of De- 
troit, said, "you are certainly entitled to 
great credit for the fine work you did, not 
only in securing in the first place for your 
district the Davis Street National Auto- 
motive Fibres' plant and the Chrysler 
Corporation plant, but for your efforts, 
which were responsible for continuing 
our companies' interest to such an extent 
that the property in question was pur- 
chased to take care of any future ex- 
pansion." 



Stockton C of C Membership 

The Stockton Chamber of Com- 
merce has more than doubled its 
membership in the last two years, ac- 
cording to Russell F. Bjorn, secretary- 
manager. 

"Two years ago, the Stockton 
Chamber had a membership of 489," 
Bjorn stated, "and on October 27, 
1944, we signed up _ our 1000th 
member. 

"According to the best informa- 
tion I can gather... thisgives Stock- 
ton the highest membership for a 
city of our size." 



Admiral Royal Eason Ingersoll. 
I .S.N., newly designated commander, 
Western Sea Frontier, will make his 
first public appearance in the Bay 
Area today as honored guest and 
speaker at a luncheon in the Com- 
mercial Club, sponsored by the San 
Francisco Chamber of Commerce and 
the Club. 

• Higher Command — In assigning 
Admiral Ingersoll to the Western Sea 
Frontier. Admiral Ernest J. King, 
Commander in Chief, U. S. Fleet and 
Chief of Naval Operations, named him 
Deputy Chief of Naval Operations 
and Deputy Commander in Chief, 
U. S. Fleet, which raised the post to a 
logistical as well as an operational 
command. 

"Today's luncheon will give 
some 600 business men the oppor- 
tunity to hear, meet, and pay 
tribute to the new Pacific War 
leader," commented Adrien J. 
Falk, president, San Francisco 
Chamber. 

• Major War Role — Admiral Inger- 
soll comes to the Pacific Theater, a 
veteran in commanding major war 
operations. 

Since January 1, 1942, he has 
been Commander in Chief of the 
Atlantic Fleet, promoted to Ad- 
miral on July 1 of that year. 

Serving in the first world war as assistant 
for Communications and Communication 
Officer, Office of the Chief of Naval Opera- 
tions, Navy Department, Admiral Ingersoll 
attained the rank of commander on February 
1 . 191S, and was awarded the Navy Cross for 
services in that assignment. 

Following a tour of duty in the Division 
of Fleet Training from i931 to 1933, he 
fitted out the USS San Francisco at Mare 
Island Navy Yard, commissioned her on 
February 10, 1934, and served as com- 
manding officer on her until June, 1935. 

• Subsequently, Admiral Ingersoll was at- 
tached to the War Plans Division, Office of 
the Chief of Naval Operations: attended the 
London Naval Conference, 1935-36; attained 
flag rank in 1938; assumed command of 
Cruiser Division Six, 1938; returned to Naval 
Department .is assistant to the Chief ut Naval 
Operations, 1940, and reported for his must 
recent duty as Commander in Chief, Atlantic 
Fleet, on January 1, 1942. 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Thursday, November 30, 1944 



by 



Get Gifts for Servicemen Now 
Asks Christmas Committee 

J. W. Mailliard, Jr., chairman. Citi- 
zens' Christmas Committee for Serv- 
ice Men and Women, today urged all 
San Franciscans to get their gift con- 
tribution? immediately so that the 
committee would be able to see to it 
that every member of the armed serv- 
ices shipping out from San Francisco 
between now and Christmas and every 
service man and women in local hos- 
pitals receives a Christmas present. 

"Our committee, composed of 
100 members representing busi- 
ness, civic and laborgroups, makes 
it possible for San Franciscans to 
turn in their gifts to the particu- 
lar club or organization to which 
they belong. From then on, the 
committee will see to it that all 
gifts reach a serviceman or woman 
by Christmas." 

• Information regarding collection 
centers raav be obtained from Mrs. 
Ralph A. Reynolds, UNderhill 6000— 
Extension 33. 

Cof C Services Praised 

Local Man, More 
Should Use, He Says 

"I do not believe that members 
of the San Francisco Chamber of 
Commerce realize what a service 
and value the Chamber of Com- 
merce can be to its subscribers." 

• This is a statement made by 
Robert E. Tayler, Tayler & Spots- 
wood, San Francisco, in a letter thank- 
ing Adrien J. Falk, president of the 
Chamber, for quick response on a 
service desired by his company. 

"Inasmuch as we support the 
Chamber of Commerce and con- 
tribute to it, why not use its serv- 
ice," suggested Tayler, praising 
"the value and service that the 
Chamber of Commerce can give to 
business houses if they will use it." 

Gift and Art Show 
Set for February 8-11 

Combined with Spring Market 
Week February 5-10, the Western 
Gift and Art Market, co-sponsored by 
the Western Merchandise Mart and 
the San Francisco Chamber, will be 
held concurrently in the Western 
Merchandise Mart and Civic Audi- 
torium from February 8 to 11, accord- 
ing to Kay Leber, show manager. 

With over 150 exhibitors already 
registered, Miss Leber predicted 
that this would be the largest gift 
and art market ever held in San 
Francisco. 



California Leads in 
Jobs for War Veterans, 
According to Survey 

Over 8.7% of all the placements of 
veterans of the last war and the pres- 
ent war made during ■ September 
through offices of the U. S. Emplov- 
ment Service, were in California, ac- 
cording to the San Francisco Cham- 
ber of Commerce Industrial Depart- 
ment. 

This information is based on an 
announcement by Paul V. McNutt, 
Chairman of the War Manpower 
Commission. 

• The announcement shows that, 
throughout the United States, 80,444 
veterans were placed in jobs, 12,492 
or 15.6% being disabled. More veter- 
ans — 6,980 — were placed in California 
than in any other state in the I Inion. 
Of those placed in California, 12.04% 
or 868 were disabled. 

The next highest state was New 
York, with 6,035 placements, involv- 
ing 1,299 or 21.5' , disabled. 

Although California absorbed 
8.7% of the total placements, the 
current civilian population of the 
state is only 6.2' ; of the nation. 

S.F. Hotel-City Action Banning 
Conventions Serves as Example 

"Courageous steps" taken by San 
Francisco in cancelling convention 
reservations "for the duration" was 
recentlv called to the attention of 
Pacific Coast Hotel Owners in a state- 
ment by James A. Whiteside, Area 
Representative of the President's 
Committee on Congested Production 
Areas, and Thomas Kiernan, District 
Rail Director, Office of Defense Trans- 
portation. 

"By this united action, Mayor 
Roger Lapham of San Francisco, the 
Hotel Employers Association . . . and 
the San Francisco Hotel Association, 
Ir.c, . . . have helped to alleviate a 
critical congestion in local hotels 
which has been represented by the 
armed forces as harmful to the war 
effort on the Pacific Coast." 



Postwar Inn Sought Here 

Believing that the community af- 
fords an excellent opportunity for the 
establishment of a large postwar com- 
bination hotel and public gathering 
place, a Bay Area chamber of com- 
merce is seeking contact with parties 
interested in the possibilities of such 
a project. Interested persons may se- 
cure further information from the 
San Francisco Chamber's Industrial 
Department. 



Washington Office, 
Clearing House For 
Farm Representatives 

The Washington Office of the San 
Francisco Chamber of Commerce, 
Frank E. Marsh, manager, has been 
designated as a clearing house for 
Californians in Washington who will 
be working on the problem of farm 
labor procurement for 1945. according 
to John E. Pickett, chairman, Agri- 
cultural Committee. 
• This decision was made after 
Marsh took recommendations of the 
Agricultural Committee and Cali- 
fornia Farm Production Council on 
order of procurement to General 
Philip Bruton, Office of Labor, De- 
partment of Agriculture, and secured 
his assurance that the recommenda- 
tion would be accepted. 

W. B. Camp, member, Agricultural 
Committee; Don McColly, assistant 
Director, Farm Production Council; 
and A. J. MacFadden, member of the 
council and chairman, California State 
Chamber Agricultural Committee, 
plan to be in Washington soon and 
will coordinate their activities through 
Marsh's office. 

"There is little doubt but that 
the farm labor supply will be 
tight in 1945, and it is of grave 
importance that order of procure- 
ment be the same as in 1944-43 — 
(1) Domestic Help, (2) Mexican 
Nationals, (3) German Prisoners," 
Pickett stated. 

"Farmers are more than willing to 
use German prisoners of war, when- 
ever possible, but this arrangement 
will in no way serve as a suitable sub- 
stitute for Mexican nationals." 



Alameda Chamber Organizes 
For Recruiting Men for Service 
In State Guard Company 

The Alameda Chamber of Com- 
merce has launched a citywide cam- 
paign to recruit 75 able-bodied men 
for service in an Alameda company of 
the State Guard, according to an an- 
nouncement by Sumner M. Graham, 
Chamber of Commerce president and 
Chairman of the Drive. 
• A special chamber committee 
has arranged to have noted State 
Guardsmen speak at various Alameda 
club meetings, and widespread adver- 
tising and a public rally on December 
7 is planned to make the drive a 
success. 



Thursday, November 30, 1944 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Facilities Expansion In State Near Three Billion 



Former Michigan Residents 
Sought Here by Veterans' Office 

The Office of Veteran;-' Affairs. 
State of Michigan, is anxious to con- 
tact former Michigan residents now- 
residing in San Francisco to serve as 
members of a Michigan Visitor Board 
here. 

Members would call on Michi- 
gan servicemen in the Army Gen- 
eral hospitals in this area to ex- 
tend Michigan's greetings, offer 
assistance, and inform them of 
the Michigan plan for veterans. 

• Anyone interested should write to 
Garnet P. Burlingame. Major. In- 
fantry (Ret), chief. Camps and Hos- 
pitals Section. Office of Veterans 
Affairs, State of Michigan. 300 N. 
Grand Avenue. Lansing, 30. 



Members' Approval of 
Cof C Work Shown by 
Response to Drive 

Splendid response is being received 
by members of the Membership Com- 
mittee of the San Francisco Chamber 
of Commerce in its drive for increased 
financial support of the Chamber's 
forward-looking program, Richard D. 
Brigham, chairman, reported today. 

"Our general membership," 
Brigham went on to say, "appreci- 
ates the fine job being done for 
the community and are showing a 
willingness to support it. 

Now is the time for all members 
who have not already done so to join 
in building a stronger business future 
for San Francisco by increasing your 
contributions to the San Francisco 
Chamber of Commerce." 



1944 EVALUATION OF SAN FRANCISCO- 
OAKLAND INDUSTRIAL AREA (Five Counties) 

Growth in the San Francisco-Oakland Industrial Area during the past five 
>e.ir~ has created one of the nation's outstanding market opportunities for 
business and industrial expansion, according to an announcement by the Re- 
search Department, San Francisco Chamber of Commerce, today. 

Several times the normal growth of a decade for this area has been 
squeezed in since 1940, reported R. B. Koeber, department manager. 
San Francisco now leads the nation among cities of 500,000 and over 
with the highest per capita income of $2246. 

A cross-section of the developments within the Industrial Area since 1930 
is shown in the following tabulation : 

SAN FRANCISCO-OAKLAND INDUSTRIAL AREA 

(Five Counties) 
Resident Population' Amount Increase or Decrease 

1930 1.306,938 

1940 1,412,686 105,748 over 1930 ,,r M' 

1944 (a) 1.929,045 516,359 over 1940 or 36.6' I 

Occupied Dwellings 

1930 56! 

1940. 148,134 82,945 over 1930 or 22.79! 

549,205 101,071 over 19411 or 22 

Factory 

Wage Earners Average 

1930 30,088 

l f >40 83,900 S3,812over 1930 or 178.8% 

1944.' 25S.0O0 174,100 over 1940 or 207.5', 

1930 S 42.000,000 

1940 124.325,000 $ 82,325,000 over 1930 or 196.03 

1944(e) 736,000,000 611,675,000 over 1940 or I 

Total Income 

1930(e) SI. 3 10,000.000 

1940 1,287,352,000 S 22.64S.0O0 under 1930 or —17', 

1944(e). 5,335.000,000 2.047.468,000 over 1940 or 159.0' 

•Civilian and -Military. (a) April 1, 1944. (e) Estimate. 





Cali- 


Cali- 


fornia 


fornia 


% 


S1.361 


5.8 


1,259 


9.3 


292 


13.9 



Although in 1"4H California had 
less than 5% of the nation's manu- 
facturing output and about 
the nation's population, over 7.5' , ol 
the nation's outlays for manufactur- 
ing, military and housing facilities ex- 
pansion from July 1. 1940, through 
June 30, 1944, were made in Cali- 
fornia. This is a statement made by 
the Chamber's Industrial Depart- 
ment, based on a recent "Facilities 
Expansion Report" by the War Pro- 
duction Board. 

• Breakdown of Expansions — Facilities ex- 
pansion outlays were as follows (in millions of 
dollars): 

United 

Purpose States 

Manufacturing $23,505 
Military 13,497 

Housing 2.104 

Of the manufacturing expansion, 68' i 
for the nation was federally financed, as 
against 70'^ for California. 

• First — In manufacturing, the largest out- 
la) . in California, was 433 million dollars, 
1 7.8* [ of the nation's total for ship construc- 
tion and repair facilities, with 24 million dol- 
lars not federally financed. 

• Second — The next largest outlay in Cali- 
fornia was for chemicals, coal and petroleum 
products, aggregating 301 million dollars or 
'Hiv, of the nation's total. Not federally 
financed in this category in California was 
162 million. 

• Third — In California the third largest out- 
lay for manufacturing facilities expansion was 
229 million dollars, 6.2% of the national 
total, for aircraft, engines, parts and acces- 
sories. In this field. 79 million dollars was non- 
federally financed. 

• War Department facilities expansion in 
California totaled 563 million dollars, 6.3% of 
the national total; Navy Department, 696 
million dollars. 15.5%. 

• Housing expansion required 292 million 
dollars in California, 13.9% of the U. S. total, 
all federally financed. 



Merchants to Give 
Christmas Display 
Materials to Hospitals 

Members of the Retail Merchants 
Association of the San Francisco 
Chamber of Commerce have been 
asked to lay aside any surplus ma- 
terials, such as artificial wreaths, 
cones, Christmas ornaments, fringe, 
tinsel, artificial trees, holly wreaths, 
cotton, paper streamers or anything 
of a decorative nature to be used for 
lixening up the rooms of service hos- 
pitals during the Christmas season. 

"Last year a number of mem- 
bers contributed most generously 
to this request and it was a revela- 
tion to see what a splendid morale 
builder these donation proved to 
be to the wounded boys," com- 
mented D. P. Street, managing 
director of the Association. 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Thursday, November 30, 1944 



FOREIGN TRADE TIPS 



The Chamber cannot guarantee any firm 
or individual mentioned in Trade Tips. It is 
suggested the usual investigation be made in 
each instance. For details call World Trade 
Department, EXbrook 4511, and refer to the 
Trade Tip's number. 

3633 SALES REPRESENTATION IN FRANCE— 

Monsieur Jean Hordoir, 240 Bourse de Commerce, 
Paris (Ier). France, desires to act as sales representative 
for packers and exporters of California foodstuffs. 

3634 CANADIAN MACHINERY INSTALLA- 
TION SERVICE— Machinist offers equipment and 
installation of productive machinery to American 

; desiring to establish plants in Canada 



- available at World 



! be contacted as lull^u-: John M> Kechnie. Tool 
& Machine Limited, 20 Millstone Lane, Toronto, 

3635 ARGENTINA SEEKS EXCLUSIVE REP- 
RESENTATION— Brown & Villa S.R.L.. Buenos 
Aires. Republica Argentina, seek contact with manu- 
facturers and exporters of all kinds of tools, emerys and 
sawmills for exclusive representation in Argentina. 

3636 MEXICAN SILVER— "La Filigrana," Semo 
Y Tachner, S. de R. L., Gante No. 7 Desp. 204. Mexico, 
D. F., manufacturers of fine silver articles, desire to 
export their products. 

3637 REPRESENTATION IN PERU— Madison 
Trading Company. Apartado 670. Lima, Peru, want u< 
represent manufacturers of cotton print, stocking, 
neckties, raw materials for textile industry, electric 
wires, buckets, candies, etc. 

3638 TEXTILES AND FIBRES FROM MEXICO 
— Lie. Emilio Riva Palacio. Fabrica de Fibraa Doras 
Atlas. S.C.L.. Verastegui 51, San Luis Potasi, Mexico, 
seeks post-war connections for export of cordage, 
twines, bags and cloth in rolls; base material being 
genuine Yucatan henequen sisal. Seek? connections it 
present export of all kinds of Tampico fibre, double 
drawn, dressed or otherwise, in various colors.and sizes. 

3639 SALES REPRESENTATION IN INDIA— 
BakhshiRam&Co-.Post Box 246, Lahore, India, manu- 
facturers' agents, established in.busiiu'--- more than 2U 
years, desire the sole agency in India for American- 
made woolens, cotton textiles, hardware, tools, motor 
parts and accessories, radio parts, photo suppli 
rubber goods. Terms and referei 
Trade Department. 

3640 FOOD MARKETS IN AUSTRALIA— Com- 
modities Pty., Ltd.. 35 William Street, Melbourne. 
C. 1. Australia, offer to act as exclusive sales agency to 
reputable U. S. firms desirous of opening markets in 
Australia for foodstuffs, wines and spirits, canned 
goods and general grocery lines. References listed with 
World Trade Department. 

3641 AGENCY IN UNITED KINGDOM— W. E. 
Aylwin & Co., 134 Fenchurch Street. London, England, 
desire contact with reliable packer oi California canned 
and dried fruit for sale in the United Kingdom on a 

3642 AGENCY REPRESENTATION IN DO- 
MINICAN REPUBLIC Jove Antonio Aracena, Com- 
mission Agent. P.O. Box 302, Santiago De Los Cabal- 
leros. Dominican Republic, W. 1.. desires to contact 
San Francisco manufacturers of cotton goods, leather, 
artificial leather, various articles for manufacture oi 
shoes, socks and stockings, hardware, enamelware, 
Chinaware and miscellany. 

3643 EXPORTATION TO COSTA RICA— Ale- 
jandro Brenes & Co., Apartado S16, San Jose de t usi.i 
Rica, wishes to purchase and represent packers^of 
canned fish and fruit, lard, wines and liquors. 

3644 SHOES FROM ARGENTINA— Casimiro 
Polledo, S.A.C.G., 2930 Alsina 2934. Buenos .Vires, 
Argentina, offer for exportation Argentine shoe- with 
guaranteed American style and.. lasts. Catalogues, 
samples, etc., sent upon request. 

SPECIAL NOTICE— Armando A. Casartelih. 
Casilla de Corro 6. Sucursal 14, Buenos Aire?. Kt- 
publica Argentina, offers a Directory (Guida G.E.F.E. ' 
listing manufacturers and exporters of Argentina, 
valued at $4.00 (U.S.). 

SPECIAL NOTICE— The Brazilian Government 
Trade Bureau, 551 Fifth Avenue. New York. 17, New 
York, has supplied the latest Brazilian Bull- tin in 
Portuguese which contains trade opportunities and 
other valuable trade information. Those interested may 
see this bulletin by calling at the World Trade De- 



Published weekly at 333 Pine St., San 


Francisco, 


Zone 4, County of San Francisco, Calil 


rn.a. Will 


Williams, Editor. Telephone EXbrook 


.511. Sub- 


scription, Fifty Cents a Year (Included 


in Annual 


Dues). Entered as Second Class matte 


April 26, 


1944. at the Post Office at San Franc 


isco, Cali- 


fornia, under the act of March 3, 1870. 





U. S. Junior Chamber 
Veterans Chairman 
Speaks Here Tuesday 

Charles C.Schlink, chairman, United 
States Junior Chamber of Commerce 
Disabled Servicemen's Program, will 
address the San Francisco Junior 
Chamber of Commerce and the San 
Francisco Co-ordinating Council for 
Veterans' service on Tuesday, De- 
cember 5. 

Schlink is directing a program 
"When Johnny Comes Home" 
designed to develop opportunities 
for the Veterans of World War II, 
in private enterprise. 

Loaned from the Caterpillar Trac- 
tor Co., of Peoria, 111., Schlink is on a 
three-month tour of ihe country. 
• He will meet with the Junior 
Chamber Military and Naval Affairs 
Committee Tuesday noon, and will 
outline his program to the Co-ordina- 
tion Council for Veterans' Service 
during the afternoon. 

San Francisco businessmen in- 
terested in re-employment of vet- 
erans are invited to attend the 
afternoon meeting to be held in 
room 1018, Appraisers' Building, 
630 Sansome Street. 



Salinas Perishables 
Flown To New York 

A Cargoliner, loaded with 5,500 
pounds of perishable fruit and vege- 
tables for sale in New Vork markets, 
left Salinas on Sunday, November 19, 
according to an announcement by 
United Air Lines. 

This is the first time the Salinas 
products have been airborne for 
commercial purposes. 



The San Francisco Chamber of Commerce 

333 Pine Street, San Francisco 4 
EXbrook 4311 



DOMESTIC TRADE TIPS 



A digest of correspondence received from 
those desiring, or offering, lines of merchan- 
dise for representation. They are listed here 
as a service without necessarily bearing en- 
dorsement by the Chamber. For further de- 
tails, contact the Domestic Trade Depart- 
ment, EXbrook 4511, Ext. 56. 



D-6077— Miriam B, Levy & Patricia Tannenbaum 
334 Weaver Street. Larchmont. N. V.. interested i: 
acting as manufacturers agent for novelty or jewelr 
lines in New York Citv. 

D-6087— C. E. Friend. Grosvenor Hotel. Vancouvei 
B. C. wishes to represent manufacturers of plasti 



1 944 State Almond Crop 

Checks totaling nearly SI, 500, 000 
will be in the mail shortly for mem- 
bers of the California Almond Growers 
Exchange, according to an announce- 
ment at the 34th annual membership 
meeting of the Exchange in Sac- 
ramento. 

• This disbursement represents a 
progress payment on the l n 44 crop, 
together with a refund of members' I 
past contributions to certain reserve ] 
funds of the organization. 

Reviewing the current almond 
situation, General Manager D. R. 
Bailey stated that a combination 
of good prices plus one of Cali- 
fornia's largest almond crops in 
history should make 1944 a record 
year for growers. 

Place a December 1 

DEADLINE on 

out-of-town Christmas Mailings'. 




^U4WC44. 



PUBLISHED BY THE 

SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 



Volume 



Thursday, December 7, 1944 



Number 36 



WASHINGTON OFFICE 



Through the Washington Office of 
the San Francisco Chamber of Com- 
merce, Frank E. Marsh, manager, the 
Chamber this week learned and ad- 
vised local contractors that the Secre- 
tary of the Navy has approved S7,- 
276,000 worth of construction for ad- 
ditional Bay Area naval facilities. 

• Effectiveness of the Washington 
Office under Marsh's direction was 
brought out by Louis B. Lundborg, 
general manager of the Chamber, who 
outlined briefly the types of services 
the office has performed in its first ten 
months of operation — services which 
it is even better prepared to execute in 
the future. 

They are : 

• Assistance to California congress- 
men in representing the region's in- 
terests both in legislation and other 
Washington problems. 

• Source for the Bay Area of informa- 
tion on pending action and proposed 
policies emanating from Washington 
agencies. 

• Source for Washington agencies of 
grass roots information as to the Bay 
Area viewpoint on these proposed 
policies and actions. 

• Assistance to government depart- 
ments and agencies through expedit- 
ing establishment of facilities, pur- 
chases of government properties, and 
all transactions between the nation's 
capitol and the Bay Area. 

• General information center for 
Washington, D. C, and for eastern 
firms desiring expansion West on 
facts and statistics^about the Bay 
Area. 

• Clarifier to Western business as to 
purposes and reasons for government 
actions and policies. 

"In many cases, exemplified in Port 
Chicago insurance and rehabilitation, 
the Army's contemplated seizure of 
hotels, and 1945 farm labor procure- 
ment policy," Lundborg continued, 
"has won the support of government 
officials on recommendations from the 
Chamber and other organizations in 
the Bay Area." 



S. F. Chamber of C Elects Officers— 
Henry Francis Grady, President 



"YANKEE TRADER" 




Dr. Henry Francis Grady 

New President, San Francisco Chamber 
of Commerce 

A world figure and an apostle of 
Americanism — that is Henry Francis 
Grady, President of the American 
President Lines and a leader in the 
San Francisco Chamber of Commerce. 

Dr. Grady has a lifelong career 
of international service to his 
country and a record of leadership 
in business and industry in his 
San Francisco Bay Area home. A 
native born San Franciscan, he 
has earned this local leadership 
by long service with the Chamber, 
first as Trade Adviser from 1922-34, 
as a director and then first vice- 
president of the Chamber in 1944. 

(Continued on page 4, col. 2) 



Dr. Henry F. Grady, president, 
American President Lines, was elec- 
ted president of the San Francisco 
Chamber of Commerce Tuesday. De- 
cember 5, and will take office Janu- 
ary 1, 1945. 

Grady, who was the Chamber's 
First Vice President, succeeds 
Adrien J. Falk, who was the 1944 
president. 

• Brayton Wilbur, president, Wil- 
bur-Ellis Company, was elected first 
vice president of the Chamber. 

• Roland Tognazzini, president, 
Union Sugar Company, was elected 
second vice president. 

• W. Lansing Rothschild, president, 
Yellow Cab Company, was elected 
third vice president. 

• Louis B. Lundborg, general mana- 
ger of the Chamber, was re-elected 
fourth vice president. 

• Prentiss A. Rowe, president, A. I. 
Hall & Son, Inc., was elected treas- 
urer, and Elmer G. Johnson, recent 
president, San Francisco Junior Cham- 
ber of Commerce, assistant treasurer, 
and M. A. Hogan, secretary. 

In accepting the presidency, 
Grady said: "It is a challenge to 
me to take up the leadership of 
the San Francisco Chamber of 
Commerce so ably and intelli- 
gently handled by my predecessor 
Adrien Falk, and a challenge that 
I welcome. 

"During the past years the San Francisco 
Chamber has showed itself willing and able to 
adjust to the many wartime changes and to 
drive ahead of the times in plans and actions. 

"The Chamber has broadened its hori- 
zons. It has led in building a workable 
basis for cooperation between the com- 
munities of the Bay Area, of California 
and the West. 

"It is my desire to carry on this good work 
and through the San Francisco Chamber to 
extend San Francisco's horizons and influence 
even further. We must build the ground floor 
for the advent of world commerce, world 
(Continued on page 4, col. .^) 



Business Activity 



ilnside 
iPages 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Thursday, December 7, 1944 



General Business Activity 



Thumb Nail Sketch 

The Research Department 

San Francisco Chamber 

of Commerce 

On the home front with the end of 
the third year of war at hand, there is 
strong evidence in San Francisco of 
mounting war activities and new an- 
nual highs in several fields of business 
and industry. 

• Labor force — Behind the records is 
the fact that a high percentage of all 
the people living in San- Francisco and 
eligible are working — actually 87 per 
cent of the males and 46 per cent of 
the females, making a total of 381,675 
persons or 110,000 more than in 1940; 
of the total, 90 per cent are at full time 
work. Significant of the part played 
by the individual in contributing to 
the expanded activity in this com- 
munity, there were included in the 
labor force on April 1, 1944, 10,600 
persons 65 years of age or over work- 
ing full time; 33,705 persons working 
sixty hours or more per week (10 per 
cent of these were women) ; and an- 
other 34,400 working between 49 and 
59 hours (14 per cent of these were 
women). About 75,000 people in the 
labor force came to San Francisco dur- 
ing the past four years. 

Besides San Francisco's im- 
portant industrial role in connec- 
tion with the war, she also serves 
in the capacity as host to the 
mounting armed forces stream- 
ing through her gates and to a 
large new civilian population. 

• Business activity — Records for 
the 10 months in San Francisco com- 
pared to the same period last year 
show general business activity rose 12 
per cent and was 82 per cent above the 
1935-39 base period. Bank debits 
were up 13 per cent, Carloading 8 per 
cent, electrical energy sales 15 per 
cent, air passenger traffic 44 per cent, 
retail trade 11 percent, placements 35 
per cent, and postal receipts 106 per 
cent. Real estate sales during this 
period passed the S100 million mark 
and were up 64 per cent, while build- 
ing was running parallel to last year 
at about $11 million. Stock Exchange 
transactions aggregating §82 million 
were up 28 per cent. Independent re- 



tail store sales at the end of the third 
quarter were up 10 per cent over the 
like period last year, with food store 
sales up 14 per cent, drug stores 16 per 
cent, men's clothing stores 18 per 
cent, women's ready-to-wear 16 per 
cent, furniture stores 12 per cent, 
hardware 1 1 per cent, and motor 
vehicle dealers 6 per cent. Filling sta- 
tion sales were off 7 per cent. 

San Francisco Bay Area bank 
debits for the 10 months' cumu- 
lative amounting to $21 billion 
were $2.3 billion above last year. 

• Freight car movements in the 

San Francisco-Oakland switching lim- 
its broke through to a new high of 
75,109 cars in October, carrying the 10 
months' cumulative to 692,000, or 63,- 
000 above the same period last year. 

• Department store sales were up 
11 per cent for the cumulative period. 

Retail department store sales in 
the regional trading areas for the 
10 months increased as follows: 
San Jose, 10 per cent; Santa Rosa, 
14 per cent; Vallejo-Napa, 12 per 
cent; Stockton, 9 per cent; Sacra- 
mento, 8 per cent; Fresno, 26 per 
cent; and Bakersfield, 15 per cent; 
with sales in Northern California 
up 11 per cent compared to 9 per 
cent in the Twelfth Federal Re- 
serve District. 

• Wholesale sales on the Pacific 
Coast based on reports to the Census 
Bureau, 264 firms reporting, for the 
first 9 months were up 4 per cent over 
the like period last year. Among 16 
groups, only four were above a year 
ago. Auto supplies were up 24 per 



SAN FRANCISCO 
BUSINESS ACTIVITY 

UNADJUSTED INDEX 1935 





cent, groceries and foods 12 per cent, 
meats 9 per cent, and tobacco prod- 
ucts 2 per cent. Sales of electrical 
goods declined 13 per cent, dry goods 
6 per cent, clothing and furnishings 
3 per cent, and footwear 2 per cent. 

• Bay Area cumulative war con- 
tracts and project orders reported in 
September amounted to $4, 722, 292,- 
000 and were $41,040,000 above the 
previous month's report. 

Supply contracts amounted to 
$3,343,076,000 and were up $8,606,- 
000. Facility contracts totaled 
$514,518,000 or $32,434,000 above 
the previous month; of this in- 
crease, military facilities ac- 
counted for $28,408,000 or more 
than one-half the total increase of 
all contracts for the period. 

• Employment and payrolls — 

Manufacturing industries in the San 
Francisco Industrial Area reported 
250,600 wage earners in October com- 
pared to 287,200 in October last year. 
While the number employed in the 
durable group was 44,000 fewer, the! 
non-durable group was up 7,400. Em- 
ployment in the manufacturing indus- 
tries during the first 10 months ! 
dropped 7.3 per cent, while payrolls] 
settled 1 per cent compared to the 
same period last year. In the non- 
manufacturing industries payrolls 
continued to rise above a year agoj 
with the 10 months' average in whole- 
sale trade up 8.6 per cent, retail trade 
2.3 per cent, hotels 20.9 per cent, and 
laundry and cleaning 6.1 per cent. 
October average weekly earnings in the 
manufacturing industries amounted 
to $59.40 compared to $59.08 in Sep- 
tember and $57.70 in October last 
year. The average hours worked per 
week amounted to 44.6 in October, 
43.9 in the previous month, and 45.0 
in October last year. 

• October cost of living index for 
all items in San Francisco amounted 
to 130.9, or 3.2 per cent above October 
last year. The 10 months' average was 
up 1.9 per cent compared to the like 
period a year ago. Based on the 101 
months' average, food costs settled 1.3 
per cent, but clothing was up 6.5 peri 
cent, rent 0.2 per cent, fuel and light 
0.1 per cent, house furnishings 8.8 perj 
cent, and miscellaneous 4.6 per cent. 



Thursday, December 7, 1944 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



SURVEY OF BUSINESS CONDITIONS 
IN SAN FRANCISCO 



BRANCH OF ACITIVITY 



<;enerai. business activity 

S. F. C. of C. Index 1935-30 Avg. = 100 

CONSTRUCTION PERMITS 

Total (number) 

(value 
Residential. New (number I 

(value] 
Single-family Dwelling NYw (number! 

(value) 
Non-residential. New (number] 

(value) 
Addition*. Alterations& Repairs (number 

(v; 
Installations Inuir 

(Vi 

REAL ESTATE 



Sales 

Mortgages & Deeds of Trust. 

Releases 



FINANCE 

Bank Debits 

Bank Clearings 
Postal Receipts 
San Francisco Stock Exchange 

COMMERCIAL FAILURES 



EMPLOYMENT & PAYROLLS— Bay Ar 

Employment 

Payrolls 



\\ h< ilesale Trade 
Relail Trade 

Holds 



San Francisco Airport Traffic 

press Shipments — Rail 
Air 
■ Mail Loaded 



rial and Co 
Water Consumer- 
Tourist ami Selilr 



(5 Co. 'si (a) 



(number) 
(no. planes) 

[i.^-'-IlC'I- 



v.hrs.l 
cull. I 
: gam: 



DAIRY RECEIPTS. FRUITS AND VEGETABLES 

Butter (pounds 

Cheese (pounds 



LIVESTOCK SLAUGHTER ib) 



Calves. (number I 

Sheep and Lambs (number) 

Hogs (number) 

S. F. LIVING COSTS 1935-39 Avft. = 100 



Keni (index 

Fuel and Light (index) 

House Furnishing Goods (index 



9,652,263 

1.175 
11,038,453 



1 658,05 7 
1.291.355 
3 04ft. 832 
503,246 
8.456.252 



11,526 
10.407 
1,119 



31.005 
2.009 
27.834 
347.281 
10.450 
1.069,595 



21 1.655 
44.316 
Ift.ojl 

107.165 
43.231 



106.3 
92.6 
138.7 
130.5 
130.9 



5,260 49ft 
1.168 

7,030.295 



1,51ft, 062 

335.329 

5,476,566 



9.002 
7.359 
1.643 



15.358 

278.060 

7.456 

475,777 



200.264 
32,283 
8.315 

106,805 
52,861 



119 
124.8 
126.8 



162.5 
208.0 
162.5 
208.0 



83.5 
0.6 
57.0 



6.907.575 

1.120 

3.827,750 

85 

557.790 

1.615 

2,935.609 



11, ISO 
105.303.417 

10.502 
81,261,628 

11,743 
83,517,340 

170 



16,087.179 
12.115.397 
27.353.310 
5.015,049 
82.164,190 

12 



2.990,664 

81.700 
7.767,607 



387.155 
1,292 

2.2IS.386 



8.063 

64,227,011 

8,489 

50,005, 1 4ft 

10,426 

67.657,927 



14,232.758 
10,833.505 
13.305.253 
4,449,441 
64.341.941 



22 



143.742 

2.577.044 

70.113 

<. 492, 831 



41,689,133 


36.413.582 


13,251.032 


16.548.114 


1.526.327 


1,052.225 


26,502.836 


15.559,580 


20,431 


19,659 


2,116,205 


1.895.889 


355,240 


256. 2S2 


136.811 


52.955 


1.003.850 


1.102.557 


619,394 


484,098 


143.0 


144.8 


136.2 


127.9 


106.2 


106.0 


o.' 5 


92.4 


129.5 


119.0 


128.3 


122.7 


128.8 


126.3 



(a) These data are based on reports submitted to the Dp 



i of Labor Statis 



ii-l I ,i 



Ma 



Call! 



(b) Federal Inspection— San Francisco District. 

Acknowledgment is hereby made to Tin. ma- Magi-e & Sons. Dun & Bradstreet. Inc., local utilities, private organizations, Federal 
Reserve Bank of San Francisco, California State Departments of Industrial Relations, Agriculture, and Employment, and the I tatted 
States Department? of Labor. Agriculture, and Commerce, and the United States Bureau of the Census, foi the basic data each 
contributed toward this survey compiled by the Research Department. San Francisco Chamber ol Commerce. 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Thursday, December 7, 1944 



FOREIGN TRADE TIPS 



The Chamber cannot guarantee any 
firm or individual mentioned in Trade 
Tips. It is suggested the usual investi- 
gation be made in each instance. For 
details call World Trade Department, 
EXbrook 4511 and refer to the Trade 
Tip's number. 

3648 FRUITS TO MEXICO— J L. Muldoon. Lopez 
Cotilla 1828. Guadalajara. Jalisco. Mexico, is interested 
in buying carlnad l.'ts m Californian fruits. 

ibil REPRESENTATIVE-Ana R. v. de Cuervo. 
S R.L.. Pedro Loza. 151. Guadalajara. Jalisco. Mexico. 
i- 1, ..;ruu. to appoint a representative in San Francisco 
for the sale of tequila. 

3650 APPLES— Rafael Caspar. Zaragoza 153. 
Guadalajara. Jalisco, Mexico, is anxious to import car- 
load of apples and other Iruils- 

3651 EXPORTATION OF FRl ITS-Camara Na- 
cional de Comercio de Guadalajara. Guadalajara. Jahs- 
co. Mexico, wants to be put in touch with firms that 
mav supply Californian fruits. . , - 

3652 INTERLINING FOR SHIRTS-Establec,- 
ni„.|i!..s Moulun .■ Ili.ura. S.A.. Vp.irtado K'KI>. Mexim 
D F Mexico wish to buy mu-rliiiing lor -flirts Sample 
is available at the World Trade Department. 

3653 REPRESENTATION— Luis Fernandez P.. 
Eugenio Mancias. 9 y 10 Barranquilla. Colombia, de- 
sires to be sales agent in Colombia and Panama of 
products, list of which is available at the World Trade 
Department. 

3654 ELECTRIC ROASTER FOR COFFEE- Luis 
A. Egas. Apartado 1323. Guayaquil. Ecuador wants 
to contact manufacturers of electric roasters lor cottee 
and coffee grinders. 

3655 POWDERED CALCIUM CARBONATE— 
Hermanns Tupino Agilent. S.A., Apartado 550, Lima. 
Peru desire connection with manufacturers of pow- 
dered calcium carbonate (whiting) for painting and 
other industrial uses. 

3656 REPRESENTATION IN PERU- J. Wein- 
hausen. Apartado 574. Lima. Peru, wants to represent 
American manufacturers. 

3657 ARGENTINE COMMODITIES E-lablcci- 
mientos i luinnco-lndustriales SAZ, Luro 7712. Mar del 
Plata. Argentina, is in position to export canned foods. 

3658 PACKING FACTORY— B. Morey. Apartado 
1407. Ponce. Puerto Rico, is interested in a packing lac- 
tory of cereals and vegetables in tins. 

3659 TRADE WITH PORTUGAL— Polimat, Ltda 
8-A Rua de Viriato. 8-B, Lisboa, Portugal, seeks repre- 
sentation of North-American manufacturers. 

3660 BUSINESS IN EG YPT— Albali & Co.. P.O. 
Box 41. Cairo. Egypt, desire to contact ni.imiu. liirer- 
01 various products for their representation in Egypt. 

3661 CURIOS— Tahiti Curios.P.O. Box 34. Papeete 
Tahiti, washes to export a great diversity of curios and 
import vegetables. 

3662 EXPORTATION TO COSTA R1CA-K 
Monge Si Co.. Call. 7 U.-ni.l 1. 702 ban J,,-c. I < -la 
Rica, desire ."in.. ■ ■ ' ... \;» Tiers and manuiac- 
turers of textiles, wines, fruits, machinery, etc. 

3663 POST-WAR Bl S1NESS MauriceZ. Moreno. 
21 Shana S hern Pa. ha. talc, Essin, [iiepanng plans 
for post-war activities, would like to contact manulac- 



3664 REPRESENTATION IN TURKEY Radqs 

Theodoropoulos, P.O. Box 1404. Istanbul. Turkey, is 
interested in representing inanulacturers of products, 
list of which is available at the World Trade Depart- 

3665 CORK— La Suberina. S.A.. Apartado 10. San 
Feliu de Guixols. Cataluna. Espana. is interested^ in 
exporting cork. 

3666 TEXTILES FROM MEXICO Eetab] 

entos Moulun e Ibarra S.A.. Apartado S002. Mexico 
D.F.. Mexico, desire to export men's and children s 
wear, cotton print, etc. 

3667 REPRESENTATION — Francisco Cainacho y 
Bory Pasaje Paris 8, Ciudad de Guatemala. Guate- 
mala, want to represent San Francisco, manufacturers 
in Central America. 

SPECIAL NOTICE— Emanuel Solorzano Fe: 
dez. Apartado 890. San J' 



Grady — An International Figure 



(Continued from page 1, col. 2) 

• In Rye, New York, he served in Novem- 
ber 1944 as chairman of the United States 
Delegation to the International Business Con- 
ference. 

• ACC— In the two years from .1942-44, Dr. 
Grady twice journeyed to Italv. He served 
from " December, 194.?, until July, 1944. as 
Vice President, Economic Section, Allied Con- 
trol Commission in Italy, with the rank of 
United States Minister, to initiate and later 
develop further the Commission's program in 
that country. 

In March, 1942, he headed the Presi- 
dent's special mission to India to stimu- 
late production of essential war ma- 
terials in that country and to determine 
ways in which the United States might 
assist effectively in this effort. 

• Far East Mission — In August, 1941. Dr. 
Grady, on special government assignment, 
went to the Far East as personal representa- 
tive of President Roosevelt to make an eco- 
nomic survey of Far Eastern countries sup- 
plying strategic defense material. 

During this period Dr. Grady was also 
active in the affairs of the San Francisco 
Chamber of Commerce, as a director, as 
chairman of the World Trade Committee. 
It is largely through his efforts that the 
San Francisco Chamber of Commerce 
has become recognized throughout the 
world for its pioneering work in the field 
of foreign trade. 

• Education — Dr. Grady received his A.B. 
at St. Mary's University, Baltimore, Md., and 
continued his studies at Catholic University, 
Washington, D.C., and later at the University 
of California. His scholarlv attainments in- 
clude a Ph.D. from Columbia University. 
New York City, in 1927. as well as the degree 
of LL.D. froni the University of San Fran- 
cisco, and the authorship of many books and 
articles on economics and foreign trade. 

With an extensive background of govern- 
ment service he entered the United States De- 
partment of State in 1934 as Chief of the Di- 
vision of Trade Agreements and Chairman of 
the Trade Agreements Committee. In 1937 he 
became Vice Chairman of the U. S. Tariff 
Commission on leave from the University of 
California, where he was Professor of Inter- 
national Trade and Dean of the College of 
Commerce. 

From 1939 to 1941, Dr. Grady was 



The San Francisco Chamber of Commerce 

333 Pine Street, San Francisco 4 
EXbrook 4311 



s of his advertising agency 
tral America. Specii 
insertion orders ar 
Department. 



Rii ,i offer ill 

Panama and Cen 

of advertising 

available 



the World Trade 



Assistant Secretary of the State, 
e American President Lines — He resigned 
in January, 1941, to accept presidency of the 
American President Lines, Ltd. 
• He has led the fight of the San Francisco 
Chamber of Commerce for better trade rela- 
tions to replace economic warfare, to abolish 
extraterritoriality, to remove Chinese immi- 
gration restrictions. 

Thus Dr. Grady's association with the 
Chamber means that San Francisco as a 
World City benefits from the direct 
services of a man whose career has, from 
the beginning, been concerned with 
world wide affairs. 

e At the present time he is chairman of the 
Board of Directors and Federal Reserve 
Agent, Federal Reserve Bank of San Fran- 
cisco; Chairman of the Economic Committee, 
League of Nations (chairman since 1940, 
member since 1937); member, Board of 
Trustees, United Seamen's Service, Inc.; 
member, U. S. Section of Canada-United 
States Committee, Chamber of Commerce of 
the United States; member, Special Com- 
mittee on International Postwar Problems, 
Chamber ot Commerce of the United States; 
he is also a member. Board of Directors. Na- 
tional Federation of American Shipping, and 
member, West Coast Committee. National 
Foreign Trade Council. 



Election of Chamber Officers 

(Continued from page 1, col. 3) 
communications, and the interest in world 
affairs which will follow the war." 

• Grady has served the San Fran- 
cisco Chamber for many years, more 
recently as director and chairman of 
the Foreign Trade Committee. 

• During this period, Grady points 
out, the Chamber has greatly in- 
creased its membership, built up a 
strong financial reserve, and increased 
its staff, committees and scope of 
activities. 

"It will be a pleasure for me to 
work with General Manager Louis 
B. Lundborg and his expert and 
enthusiastic staff." 



Published weekly at 333 Pine St., San Francisco, 
Zone 4. County of San Francisco. California. VVil! 
Williams, Editor. Telephone EXbrook 4S11. Sub- 
scription, Fifty Cents a Year (Included in Annual 
Dues). Entered as Second Class matter April 26, 
1944, at the Post Office at San Francisco, Cali- 
fornia, under the act of March 3, 1870. 




&cc4ine44~ 



PUBLISHED BY THE 

SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 



Volume I 



Thursday, December 14, 1944 



Number 37 



WASHINGTON NOTES 



• Christmas Holidays — J. A. Krug, 
Chairman of the War Production Board, has 
called on American labor and industry to ob- 
serve full work schedules in all war plants 
during the Christmas week-end, with the 
single exception of Christmas Day. 

"Because of its profound religious 
significance, Christmas day is the one 
holiday of the year which we should ob- 
serve as a holiday," said Mr. Krug. 
"However, our war production sched- 
ules are so urgent that we cannot afford 
the luxury of a shutdown over the en- 
tire Christmas week-end." 

• Trucks — A total of 15,247 vehicles was 
released under the truck rationing program 
during October, the War Production Board 
has announced. Civilian users received 350 
light trucks. 7,975 medium and 2,574 heavy 
trucks and 2,499 trailers. 

• Surplus Property — The Treasury De- 
partment distributed the first issue of the 
Surplus Reporter during the week of Novem- 
ber 27. This publication for buyers tells what 
products the Treasury Department has for 
sale. It will be distributed bi-weekly to re- 
gional mailing lists, and those who are inter- 
ested should make application to John F. 
Hough, Regional Director, Surplus Property, 
Treasury Department, 30 Van Ness Avenue, 
San Francisco 2. 

• The War Manpower Commission will 
assign interviewers from the United States 
Employment Service to assist Army camp 
commanders in the selection of 1,000 soldiers 
whose release from active duty has been au- 
thorized by the War Department for work in 
"must*' forge and foundry shops. There is 
also a possibility that the Navy may release 
men to help ease critical forge and foundry 
production lags. 

• The War Production Board has an- 
nounced that plans have been completed for 
the early creation of twelve new labor ad 1 
ory committees in addition to the 19 already 
functioning, thereby assuring labor more ex 
tensive participation in advising how to ex 
pand war production and in post "Victory-in 
Europe" Dav reconversion proposals. 

From the Chamber's Washington Office. 



Kenneth Campbell Appointed 
Chamber World Trade Manager 



Falk Comments On 
1944 "Bill of Rights" 
Observance, Dec. 10-15 

This week from December 10 to 15 is set 
aside for the commemoration of the one hun- 
dred and fifty-third anniversary of the United 
States Bill of Rights. 

• Adrien J. Falk, president, San Francisco 
Chamber of Commerce, today commented on 
this observance: 

"It is significant that our citizens need 
to set aside a certain time each year to 
dwell upon the importance and histori- 
cal meaning of the Bill of Rights. 

"It is significant because we take our rights 
for granted — which we should. They are not 
a special concession to our people. They are 
our 'right.' 

"In this Bill of Rights Week of 1944, 
a year which has brought us military 
success in liberation of peoples under 
foreign and enemy domination, let us 
remind ourselves strongly of each right 
assured us by our Constitution that we 
may continue in war or in peace to pre- 
serve and further the cause of individ- 
ual liberty." 



Holiday Unloading Plan 

All receivers of carload freight are ur- 
gently requested to unload all possible cars 
by Saturday evening, December 23, and to do 
likewise the following week, according to 
Walter A. Rohde, manager. Transportation 
Department. San Francisco Chamber, and 
chairman. San Francisco Car Efficiency Com- 
mittee. 

This will make room for arrivals dur- 
ing the actual holidays and reduce the 
accumulations which have occurred for 
the past three years, Rohde explained, 
when receivers were urged to unload on 
Christmas and New Year's Day. 



Appointment of Kenneth H. Campbell, 
now Trade Advisor for the National Foreign 
Trade Council, Inc., as manager of the 
World Trade Department of the San Fran- 
cisco Chamber of Commerce, has been an- 
nounced by Louis B. Lundborg, general man- 
ager. 

Campbell in accepting the appointment 
takes over the position formerly held by Wm. 
L. Montgomery, who is now managing di- 
rector, Bay Region Board of the China- 
American Council of Commerce and Indus- 
try, Inc. 

"In Campbell, the Chamber has a 
World Trade Manager with an ideal 
background of practical experience in 
both the private and the governmental 
fields of foreign trade. He will be a valu- 
able addition, not only to the Chamber, 
but also to the economic development of 
the San Francisco Bay Area in which 
foreign trade plays such a vital role," 
Lundborg said. 

• As manager of the World Trade De- 
partment, Campbell will act as secretary of 
the Chamber's Foreign Trade, Customs. Es- 
sential Trade Routes, Hawaiian Affairs 
Inter-American Trade, Merchant Marine 
and Harbor, and Philippine Affairs commit- 
tees. 

Campbell is widely known and ac- 
quainted in San Francisco foreign trade 
circles, through his work in national 
fields in the past fifteen years. 

• Board of Economic Warfare — Prior to 
his activity with the National Foreign Trade Coun- 
cil. Inc., as Trade Advisor, Campbell was chief of 
the Exporters Service Division. Board of Economic 
Warfare, from April to October 1942, and Trade 
Relations Advisor from October 1942, to Septem- 
ber 23. 1943. He accepted his position with the 
Board on request of Milo Perkins, director, after 
obtaining a leave of absence from rhe National As- 
sociarion of Credit Men. New York, with which he 
was associated as director of the Foreign Depart- 
ment, and manager. Foreign Credit Interchange 

Campbell is one of the few United States 
members of the Inter-American Commercial 
Arbitration Commission and Chairman of its 
Business Service Committee. He is also mem- 
ber of the American Economic Association, 
Academy of Political Science, Economic Club 
of New York and numbers of foreign trade 
committees with which he has been associated 
for many years. 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Thursday, December 14, 1944 



C of C to Expand Public Relations Program 



C. E. D. Survey Shows 30% 
More Jobs in S. F. after War 

An increase of 30 percent more jobs in the 
postwar period in San Francisco over 1940 is 
reflected in a sampling of manufacturing 
firms taken by the Research Department, 
Federal Reserve Bank — their first Committee 
for Economic Development survey on post- 
war employment possibilities in San Francisco 
— and released to the San Francisco Chamber. 
• Labor Force represented — Although 
the shipbuilding industry and firms with 
fewer than twenty employees were not in- 
cluded in the 230 reports received, approxi- 
mately 55 percent of the total labor force of 
1940 employed in the manufacturing field is 
represented. 

There were 271,306 workers in all 
lines in 1940 in San Francisco. If this 30 
percent is projected to include the entire 
labor force, there will be 81,700 more 
jobs in postwar San Francisco than in 
1940. 



Oakland C of C Elects 
Nine New Directors 

Nine Oakland business men have been 
elected as new members of the 1945 Board of 
Directors of the Oakland Chamber of Com- 

• They are as follows: O. H. Fischer, presi- 
dent, Union Diesel Engine Co.; Kenneth 
Gelwix, vice-president, American Trust Co.; 
John D. Holmes, division manager, Pacific 
Telephone and Telegraph Co.; Edgar B. 
Jessup, president, Marchant Calculating Ma- 
chine Co.; Irving F. Lyons, traffic director, 
California Packing Corporation; Weller 
Noble, manager, Pacific Guano Co.; Ingra- 
ham Read, publisher, Oakland Post-Enquirer; 
William F. Reichel, of William F. Reichel, 
Insurance; and Louis Scheeline, merchant 
tailor. 

The 27 Oakland Chamber board 
members will meet mid-December to 
elect officers. 



New Apparel City, Inc. 
Completes Purchase of 
25 Acre Site for Project 

Completion of the purchase of 25 acres of 
land for erection of Apparel City was an- 
nounced last week by Milton Dorman, 
Chairman of the Board for Apparel City, 
Inc., when the last six acres of land needed 
in the Potrero district site was purchased. 

According to Dorman, actual con- 
struction of the four million dollar gar- 
ment center will begin as soon as ma- 
terials are released. 

• In the meantime, he said, negotiations 
are under way with prospective concession- 
aires to settle establishment of facilities for 
buyers and employees of the garment indus- 
tries. 

Congratulating Dorman and the Ap- 
parel Industry on progress to date, 
Adrien J. Falk, president, San Francisco 
Chamber, said, "Your project will rep- 
resent a great forward step for San 
Francisco and for your industry. The 
way in which you are pushing ahead for 
completion of the project is an example 
to all of us." 



Send Warm Clothing 
to Russian Children 

"Play Santa to a Russian Child" is the 
slogan of the San Francisco Committee for 
Russian War Relief's Christmas Campaign, 
sponsored by the Northern California Coun- 
cil of Churches and the State Junior Cham- 
ber of Commerce. 

• Cooperation of organizations and indi- 
viduals is sought in appealing to Bay Area 
families to add warm garments for Russian 
children to their Christmas shopping lists. 



Bay Area Represented 
at Aviation Conference 
in Southern California 

E. V. Mills, chairman, Bay Area Aviation 
Committee, and Kenneth MacDonald, secre- 
tary of the committee, and manager, Avia- 
tion Department of the San Francisco Cham- 
ber, attended a two-day California Aviation 
Conference in Los Angeles December 12 and 
13. 

The conference was sponsored by Cham- 
bers of Commerce of Balcersfield, Berkeley, 
Long Beach, Los Angeles, Oakland, Sacra- 
mento, San Diego, San Francisco, and the 
National Aeronautic Association. 

Representing Oakland were Elmer H. 
Hammond, manager, Industrial Department 
of the Oakland Chamber, and Don Follett, 
assistant to Oakland City Manager. 

Representing Berkeley were Weldon 
Vance, manager, Berkeley Chamber's Trans- 
portation and Industrial Division, and Ches- 
ter Bekins of the Chamber's Transportation 
and Aviation Divisions, also representing the 
city. 



Expansion of the San Francisco Chamber 
of Commerce Public Relations Department 
with Harold B. Mills, as manager, was an- 
nounced yesterday by Chamber General 
Manager Louis B. Lundborg. 

Membership relations which were for- 
merly included within the department 
have been separated and an indepen- 
dent staff department will be named 
shortly, Lundborg said. 

• C. E. D. — In addition to handling en- 
larged public relations activities, Mills wili 
also devote much of his time in the coming 
months to launching the program for the 
Committee for Economic Development which 
has affiliated with the Chamber. 

Explaining the new move, Lundborg said: 
"In a sense the fundamental job of a 
chamber of commerce is one of public 
relations. But there are so many special- 
ized phases of this job, involving pro- 
motion, special events, luncheon meet- 
ings, contacts with neighborhood 
groups, armed forces, veterans, the city 
administration, and other governmental 
units that it was felt the full attention of 
a specialized department should be 
given to these matters." 

Among his specific assignments. Mills will act as 
secretary to the Luncheon. Naval Affairs and other 
Committees, serve as City Hall Representative for 
the Chamber and act as secretary for a speakers 

"Mills will be responsible for general com- 
munity relations work," Lundborg said. "This 
is a phase of the Chamber's activities which 
has greatly expanded in the last few years with 
the increasing effort on the part of the cham- 
ber to build up a cooperative working relation- 
ship among all San Francisco groups inter- 
ested in promoting the community welfare." 

• Offices— Mills is a member of the executive 
committee of the San Francisco Coordinating Coun- 
cil for Veterans Services. He is president-elect of 
the San Francisco Kiwanis Club; past commander, 
American Legion; past president, American Le- 
gion Service Club in Oakland; and past president, 
Oakland Speakers Bureau. 

Eleven Berkeleyans Elected to 
Chamber Board of Directors 

Eleven Berkeley business leaders were 
elected to the Board of Directors of the 
Berkeley Chamber of Commerce Tuesday, 
December 12. 

• They are as follows: Allen Stacy, presi- 
dent of the Berkeley Junior Chamber of 
Commerce; Chester Bekins, van and storage 
executive; W. C. Moldenschardt, banker; 
James W. Schofield, industrial sales engineer; 
Clarence A. Bullwinkel, auto dealer; W. A. 
Gonser, merchant; Lester W. Hink, depart- 
ment store executive; Ralph H. Robb, manu- 
facturer; A. K. Beckley, production manager; 
Jack Misselhorn, airline executive; and 
Arthur Westlund, radio station manager. 

The Board will meet for election of 
officers on December 18. 



Thursday, December 14, 1944 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Eastman Tag and Label 
Company Plans Half 
Million Dollar Plant 

Approximately a half-million dollars will 
be invested in a new manufacturing plant on 
a 10-acre site at Richmond hy the Eastman 
Tag and Label Company, according to the 
San Francisco Chamber's Industrial Depart- 
ment which cooperated in initial negotiations 
resulting in the proposed development. 

The new project will expand the Com- 
pany's present San Francisco operations 
with headquarters at 548 Fourth Street. 

• Plans already are being prepared for 
erection of a {(100,000 modern plant building, 
work on which will commence as soon as war 
restrictions are eased. The contemplated proj- 
ect will cover an area 1,200 by 400 feet, and 
new high speed, automatic type machinery* 
costing #100,000, will be installed. 

The company will employ approxi- 
mately 200 persons in their new plant. 

• Market — Serving every category of busi- 
ness which has need for tag and label pro- 
ducts, the Eastman marketing territory em- 
braces the entire west, including Alaska and 
the Hawaiian Islands. 



TRIBUTE TO PAST PRESIDENT FREEMAN 



San Jose Merchants 
Courtesy Suggestions 
Given Wide Notice 

An excellent example of the thought put 
forward by the San Francisco Chamber a 
number of times during the past busy, war- 
time years that "there is no rationing of 
courtesy" is the following contribution of the 
Merchants Association of San Jose, Adrien J. 
Falk, president, San Francisco Chamber, de- 
clared today: 

"Who Am I? 

© I am a little thing with a big meaning. 

• I help everybody. I unlock doors, open 
hearts, do away with prejudices. 

• I create friendships and goodwill. I inspire 
respect and admiration. 

• Everybody loves me ... I bore nobody. 
I violate no laws ... I cost nothing. 

• Many have praised me, none have con- 
demned me. I am pleasing to everyone. 

• I am useful every part of the day. 

• I am courtesy!" 




Surplus Machine Tools 
Announced by Navy Yards 

The Supply Officer, Mare Island Navy 
Yard, will receive bids on December 21, on 
23 items, including machine tools, wood- 
working machines, paint grinding mill, blue 
print coating machine, belt conveyor, and a 
concrete testing machine. 

Information is obtainable from Comdr. 
E. W. Fenton, Survey and Sales Officer, Val- 
lejo 3-4511, Extension 6209. 

• Mare Island also will accept bids by De- 
cember 15 for approximately 600,000 lbs. of 
mixed scrap paper in bales and for approxi- 
mately 400,000 lbs. of corrugated and fibre- 
board scrap in bundles. 

Christmas Pageant to be Held 
at Opera House, Dec. 19 

A Christmas Pageant open to the public 
will be held in the San Francisco Opera 
House, Tuesday evening, December 19, at 
8:30 p.m., according to an announcement by 
Miss Josephine D. Randall, superintendent. 
Recreation Department. 

• "Christmas Reflections" is the title of 
the pageant which will be presented by the 
Recreation Department. 

Newcomers to San Francisco, war 
workers, and servicemen and women are 
especially invited, Miss Randall said, 
and clubs and civic organizations are 
asked to inform members of the Pag- 
eant. 



C of C Association 
Elects 1945 Officers; 
Behrens is President 

1945 officers of the Central and Northern 
California Chamber of Commerce Execu- 
tives (formerly CANCACS) were an- 
nounced last week with Jack Behrens, gen- 
eral manager, Napa Chamber of Commerce, 
as president. 

• Behrens succeeds Leslie J. Freeman, 
general manager, San Leandro Chamber, 
who at the election meeting, December 5, was 
presented with a sterling silver membership 
card by Russell E. Pettit, general manager, 
San Jose Chamber, in appreciation of out- 
standing service during his term in office. 

• Emory Gay Hoffman, manager, Kern Coun- 
ty Chamber, is newly elected vice-president. 

• C. P. Tanner, manager, Domestic Trade De- 
partment, San Francisco Chamber, was re-elected 
secretary-treasurer. 

• Four directors elected are: Iona Booth, exec- 
utive secretary. Contra Costa Development Asso- 
ciation; Valerie Kuhn, manager, Redwood Empire 
Association; R. L. Kimmel, manager. Modesto 
Chamber; and Walter Fink, manager, Redding 
Chamber. 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Thursday, December 14, 1944 



FOREIGN TRADE TIPS 



The Chamber cannot guarantee any firm 
or individual mentioned in Trade Tips. It is 
suggested the usual investigation be made m 
each instance. For details call World I rade 
Department, EXbrook 451 1 and refer to the 
Trade Tip's number. 

J668 ARGENTINE COMMODITIES — Casa Ar. 



Tucun 



141 



I pOM 



which is available at ihe World Trade Department. 

!669 LIQUORS AND FOOD PRODUCTS — 
hrantisto C. J. Pedemonte, San Martin 154, Buenos Aires. 
Argentina, exports food products, liquors, wines, etc. 

S670 CANNED FRUITS— C. Alvarez de Lara, Apar- 
tado 1507, Caracas, Venezuela, wishes Co contact exporters 
of canned fruits. 

3671 BOTTLES FOR ECUADOR— The West In- 
dian Bav Rum Co., Casilla 18:. Guayaquil, Ecuador, in 
urgent need for importation of bottles for perfumes, lo- 

"°1672 GUATEMALAN CARDAMON SEED — 

Leon Cuttmaun y Cia., Sa Avenida Sur, 6-8. Guatemala, 
wish to establish connections with firms interested in the 
importation of decorticated cardamon seed. 

3673 HAND CARVED MAHOGANY — House- 
hold goods, such as table mats, hand carved from mahog- 
any— also made from palm leaves— bv trained and skillful 
workmen, are offered for exportation by Pohl k Bacha, 
P. O. Box 219, Port-au-Prince. Haiti. 

3674 MOTORS — Standard Oil Company (Incor- 
porated m Alaskal. P. O. Box 145, Edmonton, Alberta. 
Canada, operating in the Canol Project, Yukon Territory, 
Canada, for the United States Government, need urgently 
two only 1/16 h.p. direct current reversible motors, 1750 
r.p.tn.. AA1-MRO-W6, rating covers. 

3675 TRADE WITH EGYPT— The National Im 
penal ft Eaport Co.. Malika Farida Street 23, Caito, 
Egypt, are anxious to establish business connections with 
manufacturers dealing with groceries, papers, raw materials 
and chemicals for industry, etc. 

3676 FOOD PRODUCTS — Compagnie des Agents 
de Vent, de ^Alimentation. 45 Rue d'Hauteville, Paris, 
France, desire contacting food products manufacturers for 
their representation in France and the French Empire. 

3677 BUSINESS IN SOUTH AFRICA— Amalga- 
mated Overseas Agencies, P. O. Box 2016. Durban. South 



Air 



i.tl tela 



eith . 



3678 REPRESENTATION IN GREECE— A. C 
Kazanczis S: N. L. Chnsanthopoulos, Saraudaporou Street 
27. Athens S. Greece, arc interested in representing manu- 
facturers of canned foods, chemical products, plastics, rub- 

3679 COMMODITIES FROM CHILE — Martin 

Duran R.. Apartado 4005, Santiago. Chile, is in position 
to export a great diversity 
articles, list of which „ as 



pan 



le at the World Trade De- 

3680 MEXICAN TRADE— Casa Corbii, S. R. L.. 
.partado 10638, Mexico. D. F.. Mexico, wants to export 
asaries. articles for sport, furnitures, etc.. and import 



3681 REPRESENTATION IN CUBA — Genera! 
Services Corporation, San Jose 116. Altos. La Habana, 
Cuba, seeks representations of American manufacturers. 

3682 TRADE WITH NICARAGUA— Roger Aba 



3684 CUBAN PRODUCTS— J. A. Roblejo, Bello. 
Apartado 944, La Habana. Cuba, seeks connections with 
importers of rum, hard candy, rattan, cigars, etc . and with 
exporters of canned fruits, wheat flour, sardines, onions. 

3685 FATS— George Ramshaw. P. O. Box 109, G 
O. P.. Perth. Western Australia, urgently desires to obtain 
supplies of dtippings. lard and fats. 



i/iake every advertisement 
produced in San Francisco 
aid our Country's war effort. 



C. E. D. Handbooks 
For S. F. Businessmen 
Available at C of C 

Handbooks and pamphlets published by 
the Committee for Economic Development 
and on file at the San Francisco Chamber of 
Commerce were today listed by Virgil E. 
Reames, comptroller. 

Extra copies are available, or may be bor- 
rowed from the Chamber's library, of the fol- 
lowing publications: 

• The Postwar Outlook for Business and 
Labor — bv Sumner H. Slichter, speech. 

• Selecting and Training Postwar Sales 
Personnel — five handbooks. 

• Postwar Employment and the Settlement 
of Terminated War Contracts — Statement 
on National Policy. 

• Postwar Employment and the Liquida- 
tion of War Production — Statement on Na- 
tional Policy. 

• The Economics of a Free Society — A 
Declaration of American Business Policv. 

• Plan Postwar Jobs — Now — Suggestions 
for Industrial Employers. 

• Handbook No. 1 for Industry — Planning 
the future of your business. 

• Bank Credit: Your Postwar Program and 
Your Banker. 

• C.E.D. Handbook (Community) on the 
Special Problems of Small Business. 

• A Postwar Federal Tax Plan for High 
Employment. 

• Handbook for Retailers. 

• Handbook for Wholesalers — (Including 
Handbook for Retailers) . 

Anyone interested in borrowing or ob- 
taining extra copies of any of these pub- 
lications may call the San Francisco 
Chamber, EXbrook 4511, Ext. 38. 



Published weekly 


at 333 Pi 


H St 


, San Fran 


:isco, 


Zone 


, County of San Fran 




California 


Will 


Williams, Editor. 


Telephon 


• EXbrook 4511. 


Sub- 




on, Fiftv C 


•nts a Yea 


r (Included in A 


inual 


Dues 


. Entered a 


s Second 






il 26, 


1944, 


at the Post 


Office ai 




Francisco, 


Cali- 


fornia 


under the 


ct of March 3, 


1870. 





The San Francisco Chamber of Commerce 



333 Pins Street, 
EXbrook 45 11 



San Francisco 4 



DOMESTIC TRADE TIPS 



A digest of correspondence received from 
those desiring, or offering, lines of merchan- 
dise for representation. They are listed here 
as a service without necessarily bearing en- 
dorsement by the Chamber. For further de- 
tails, contact the Domestic Trade Depart- 
ment, EXbrook 4511, Ext. 56. 

D-6079 — Picot Laboratories, Inc 



Building, 
ccrn *itl. 



abhshed laboratories in Colombia, Venezuel 
co and Mexico, having a trained sales orgam 
ling physicians and coverage of the wholesale 



additional 1 
motional work. Manufacturing-packing- warehousing 
distributing facilities available in each 

D-608O— D. L. Leavitt, 438 Cha 
Building, Los Angeles I 5, California, in 
manufacturers' representative for home appliances, produ 
on and shop applications for aircraft, marine and gei 



Investiga- 
I Commerce 



indu 



eleven Western States. 



Retailers Asked to Give Added 
Boost to 6th War Loan Sales 

With barely 40 per cent of San Francisco's 
quota of war bonds sold, W. W. Crocker, 
chairman, California Committee of the 6th 
War Loan, says, "if we are to make our quotas 
— and we must — San Francisco and the rest 
of Northern California must subscribe more 
in the last week of the drive than has been 
bought in the first three weeks." 
• Retailers were asked by Delos Walker, 
chairman. Retailers War Campaign Commit- 
tee, Washington, D. C, to exert every effort 
to accelerate sales through advertising and 
demonstration. 

"We thoroughly recognize the diffi- 
culty of your present position, with 
short staffs besieged by customers . . . ," 
Walker said in part, "but the work of 
retailers so far through each of the five 
drives has been so increasingly effective 
that we hope even in the face of the 
present difficulties . . . (you will use) 
every possible demonstration you can 
apply to increase direct bond sales 
through your establishments." 




&cteiae44- 



PUBLISHED BY THE 

SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 



Volume 1 



Thursday, December 21, 1944 



Number 38 



S. F. "Work Pile" Over $126 Million 



WASHINGTON NOTES 



• Workers Placement Paul V. 
McNutt, Chairman of the War Man- 
power Commission, has announced 
plans for an expanded employment 
counseling service in local offices of 
the I'nited States Employment Serv- 
ice to assist returning veterans, dis- 
placed war workers, new workers and 
other job applicants. The primary ob- 
jective of the job counseling program. 
Mr. McNutt emphasized, is the ap- 
propriate placement of workers — in 
short, the suitable matching of men 
and jobs. 

• Production of farm machinery 
exclusive of wheel tractors, repair 
parts and attachments, for the four 
months' period July 1 to October 31, 
1<'44. is approximately 25 per cent be- 
hind manufacturers' schedules, the 
Farm Machinery and Equipment In- 
dustry Advisory Committee was in- 
formed by War Production Board 
officials at its meeting in Washington 
recently. Discussion brought out that 
industry members consider manpower 

es the number one factor re- 
tarding production. 

• The Surplus Reporter, iss < 
weekly by the Surplus Property Office 
of the Treasury Department, is the 
only manner in which information can 
In- obtained about products and com- 
modities which are for sale. 

Anyone interested in buying sur- 
plus war products should advise the 
Treasury office in San Francisco, of 
which Mr. John F. Hough is Regional 
Director, located at 30 Van Xess 
Avenue. The Treasury Department 
will send this publication without 
charge. 

—From the Chamber's WashingtonOffic*. 



S. F. Junior Chamber 
Elects 15 Members 
to Board of Directors 

At the annual election of the Board 
of Directors, held yesterday by the 
Junior Chamber of Commerce, the 
following young San Franciscans were 
elected to serve for the year 1945: 

Belford Brown, Matthew Car- 
berry, Mark Daniels, Jr., Don 
Fazackerley, Harry Goodfriend, 
Volney Howard, William McCub- 
bin, Charles Merrill, Jr., Albert 
Meyer, Harold Osborn, Paul Pflue- 
ger, Jr., William Poynter, Frank 
Ryan, Edward J. Schneider, and 
John C. Wade. 

• The officers of the organization 
will be elected at the organization 
meeting of the new Board within a 
week. 



Steamship Co. Plans Postwar 
Transpacific Service From S. F. 

W. R. Grace & Co. announced 
plans last week for establishment of a 
new postwar passenger and freight 
service from San Francisco to the 
Philippines, China and Japan. 

According to information re- 
ceived by former Chamber Presi- 
dent Ernest Ingold in 1943, the 
company also has intentions for 
additional service from San Fran- 
cisco to the Latin American coun- 
tries after the war. 



Re-check reports of San Francisco 
"Work Pile" figures and additional 
reports of members of the San Fran- 
cisco Chamber "Work Pile" Commit- 
tee bring the total to SI 26.206.73'), as 
of December 15, Earl Lee Kelly, chair- 
man of the Chamber's recently organ- 
ized "Work Pile" Committee an- 
nounced today. 

This figure does not include the 
131 million dollars that the City of 
San Francisco has set up in its 
master plan, Kelly explained. 

• October rechcck of former "Work Pile" 
figures brought the total to $70,322,519. and 
new "Work Pile" reports made by committee 
members at a recent meeting brought the 
total to $126,206,739, a figure almost double 
that of December, 1943. 

• Women's "Work Pile" now being com- 
piled in a survey of San Francisco homes by 
the housewives totals $139,220. and includes 
only remodeling and repair work, new addi- 
tions and new equipment such as washing 
machines, radios and irons. The women's 
"Work Pile" project is conducted by the 
Women's Roundtable in conjunction with the 
"Work Pile" of the San Francisco Chamber. 

"A survey is also being made of pos- 
sible home construction," Kelly con- 
tinued, "and we expect close to 75 mil- 
lion dollars will be reported upon com- 
pletion of this survey." 

• Steady growth of San Francisco's Work 
Pile" since August, 1943 is reflected in the 
following progress report : 

Aug. 1943 $ 8.698.197 

Oct. 1943 57,317,575 

Nov. 1943 58,6! 

Dec. 1943 66,181,725 

Feb. 1944 06.706,900 

Apr 1944 r.f>. 733.600 

Oct. 1944 67.443.605 

Dec. 1944 126.206.739 

Members of the Chamber's "Work Pile" 

Committee are: 

Earl Lee Kelly, chairman; L. A. Bailey, 

Wakefield Baker. S G. Fisher, Ernest Ingold, 

Elmer B. Johnson, Erlu. I). Landels. Thos. J. 

I.enehan. Julius Marx. 1. P. Newbauer, Fred 

Pruter. Jas. Rolph III. K D. Stetson, K. 1. 

Stringham. Karl M. Stull. J. D. Sullivan, 

Kirk Whitehead. King Wilkin. 



Uforry Christmas 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Thursday, December 21, 1944 



John Ek Named New Head 
of Membership Department 



Progress Reported in Annual 
Domestic Trade Group Report 

The Domestic Trade Committee of 
the San FYancisco Chamber in its 
1 ( H4 Annual Report to the Board of 
Directors listed accomplishments in 
trade area relations, merchandise ex- 
hibits, market analyses and general 
public relations as among the most 
important activities of the year, 
Arthur W. Towne, chairman, an- 
nounced today. 

• Trade Area Relations — Based on the 
premise that in order to exchange goods and 
sen ices, a friendly and cordial relationship 
must be developed between individuals and 
communities, the committee arranged a series 
of get-together visits with Chamber of Com- 
merce delegations of San Jose, Sacramento, 
Watsonville, Alameda, Pittsburg, Richmond 
and Stockton. 

The last "good neighbor" project was en- 
tertainment in San Francisco of members of 
the Central and Northern California Cham- 
ber of Commerce Executives. 

• Western Art and Gift Show — To pro- 
mote San Francisco as the principal market 
center in the eleven Western States for con- 
sumer goods, the committee co-sponsored 
with the Western Merchandise Mart the 
Western Gift and Art Show in June, and is 
cooperating now for holding of a Spring Gift 
and Art Show. 

• Market Analyses — To aid San Francisco 
wholesalers and producers in evaluating de- 
mands for goods and services in the year fol- 
lowing the war, a sub-committee is completing 
analyses covering San Francisco and the Bay 
Area and will eventually survey the eleven 
western states. 

• General Public Relations — To improve 
further San Francisco's public relations in the 
1 1 western states, the committee originated 
the idea of appointing the chief executive of 
each chandler of commerce a Guest Member 
of the San Francisco Chamber with the oppor- 
tunity to have headquarters at the Chamber 
from whence to operate when visiting San 
Francisco. 

This opportunity has already been used 
by many managers of chambers from 
cities throughout the West. 



Appointment of John Ek, formerly 
manager, Membership Service De- 
partment, Omaha Chamber of Com- 
merce, as new manager of the San 
Francisco Chamber Membership De- 
partment, has been announced by 
Louis B. Lundborg, general manager. 

Ek comes to the San Francisco 
Chamber after fifteen years of 
service with the Omaha Chamber 
during which time he set an out- 
standing record, Lundborg de- 
clared. 

• Membership Drives — Out of his 
fourteen membership drives tor the 
Omaha Chamber, most were record- 
breakers, and his complete plan for 
the 1940 campaign was published in 
a United States Chamber of Com- 
merce membership campaign manual. 

Ek's work in the membership 
field has been recognized nation- 
ally several times, when he has 
been called upon to conduct re- 
gional and nationwide training 
courses in membership work to 
organization managers at their 
training institutes. 



Freight Handling Contract 
Desired By Lathrop Point 

Col. C. V. King, Commanding Offi- 
cer of the Lathrop Holding and Re- 
consignment Point, Lathrop, Cali- 
fornia, announces thai proposals for 

a freight handling contract at the 
Point are desired. 

The new contract will become 
effective February 1, 1945, and de- 
tails and copies of the proposal 
will be obtainable from the Pur- I 
chasing and Contracting Officer 
at the Point on December 22, 1944. i 



S. F. "Unofficial Representatives" 

Two "unofficial representatives" oi 
the San Francisco Chamber "I Com- 
merce in Washington. D. C. are Rex 
A. Anderson, Assistant Administra- 
tor, Office of Management Services <>l 
the Foreign Economic Administra- 
tion, and Walter Duncan, also \s 
sistant Administrator, FEA, accord- 
ing to information received from 
Frank F Marsh, manager, Chamber's 
Washington Office. 

Anderson was born in Alturas, 
California, and both he and Dun- 
can made their home for many 
years in Loyalton, California. 



"What's Ahead" -Slogan 
For Spring Market Show 

"What's Ahead" is the slogan her- 
alding the Western Spring Market ti 
be held February 5 to It), according 
to Frank K. Runyan, president, West- 
ern Merchandise Mart. 

Decorative accessories will be 
shown in Gift and Art Exhibits at 
the Civic Auditorium and the 
Merchandise Mart, February 8-11, 
co -sponsored by the San Fran- 
cisco Chamber. 



Charles Page is S. F. 
Chairman, C. E. D.; 
Program is Stepped Up 

Appointment of Charles Page, di- 
rector. Johnson & Higgins of Cali- 
fornia, as San Francisco community 
chairman of the Committee for Eco- 
nomic I >evelopment, was announced 
this week jointly by Raymond M. 
Alvord, chairman, Coast Counties 
District, C. E. D. and Adrien J. Falk, 
president, San Francisco Chamber of 

Commei i e 

• Chamber C. E. D. — The commit- 
tee which Page will head will also 
serve as the Chamber's Committee 
for Economic Development. 

"Under Page's direction," Al- 
vord explained, "C. E. D. activi- 
ties in San Francisco will be 
stepped up to make San Francisco 
foremost in preparation for full 
postwar employment and busi- 
ness expansion." 

• Harold B. Mills of the Chamber 
staff will devote his time to the work 
of C. E. I), in cooperation with Page 
and his committee. Mills will assist in 
co-ordinating and setting up working 
machinery for the San Francisco 
C. E. I '. program. 

Page \v,i> general manager of the 
San Francisco Chamber from 1934 to 
193°, after which he served as a mem- 
ber of the Chamber's Board of Direc- 
ts irs lor a two-year term. 



West Coast Shipyards 
Again Lead the Nation In 
November Ship Deliveries 

During November, West Coast ship- 
yards again led the nation in the 
delivery of ships, according to infor- 
mation received b\ the Chamber's 
Industrial Department, from the I ' S. 
Maritime Commission. 

• Deliveries were as follows: 

West Coast Yards 60 

I ,i--i t ,>a-.t Yards 46 

Cull ( oast \ ards 39 

('.real Fakes Yards 9 

Twenty-two of the ships were delivered 

by yards in the San Francisco Bay Area, 

including 11 military type; 1 coastal 

cargo; 4 tankers; 1 naval tanker; 1 C-type 

cargo; and 4 victory cargo. 

• In October the West Coast delivered 50 
snips and the Bay Area, 19. In September 
West coast deliveries totaled 45 with 19 front 
the Bay Area 



Thursday, December 21, 1944 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Foreign Trade Group 
Executive Committee 
for 1945 Elected 

The newly elected 1945 executive 
committee of the Foreign Trade As- 
sociation of the San Francisco Cham- 
ber of Commerce was announced at 
the Association's regular Monday 
meeting. Dec. 1 * 

They are as follows: 

Nicholas Craig. District Manager. Pan 
American Airways System; J. S. Curran. Yice- 
President, Anglo California National Dink: 
A. McKie Donnan, Account Executive. Rris- 
acher. Van Norden & Staff: Fred B. Gal- 
breath, Manager, Pacific Department. Ma- 
rine I >mce ol America; \V. B. Gribble, Assist- 
ant Manager, Export Department. \V. P. 
Fuller & Co.; Eugene H. Hurst. Assistant 
Freight Traffic Manager. Matson Navigation 
Company; Frank M. Jacobs. Special Repre- 
sentative. Foreign Sales Department. I'nion 
Oil Co.; John J. Judge. Regional Manager. 
I'nited States Department of Commerce; 
P. A Kinnoch, Vice-President and Manager. 
Foreign Department. American Trust Com- 
panv; A. P. Lazarus. Vice-President and 
Treasurer. Getz Bros. & Co.; J. J. Lermen. 
Jr.. Export Manager, Tide Water Associated 
Oil Co.; Emil I.euenberger. Assistant Vice- 
President and Manager, Foreign Depart- 
ment. Wells Fargo Bank & Union Trust 
Companv; Ira S. l.illick. Admiralty Attorney. 
Lillick, Geary. Olson & Charles; E. J. Mac- 
farlan. Export Department. M Standard Oil 
Company of California; George H. Mahoney, 
Assistant Manager. W. R. Grace & Co.; 
\I. J. McCarthy. President. San Francisco 
Foreign Freight Forwarders, Inc.; Win. F. 
Minehan. Assistant Vice-President, Bank of 
America, N. T. & S A ; W'm. L. Montgomery. 
Managing Director, China-America Council 
mmerce & Industry, Inc.: P. R. Mott. 
Foreign Freight Agent, Southern Pacific Corn- 
Jay T. Reed. Executive, Otis. McAllis- 
ter & Company: R. J. Roesling. R. J. Roes- 
ling &• Co.: Harry S. Scott, President. Gen- 
eral Steamship Corporation; P. R. Tobin, 
Freight Agent, Western Pacific Railroad Co. 



Charles Gibbs Appointed C of C 
Agricultural Activities Manager 




CHARLES E. ( 
New Agricultural Depar 



Campaign Heightens 
on Holiday Unloadings 

Letters have been sent to 550 car- 
load receivers in San FYancisco in a 
direct appeal to unload freight cars 
by the Saturday evenings preceding 
Christmas and New War's days, ac- 
cording to Walter A. Rohde, chair- 
man . San Francisco Car Efficiency 
Committee and manager, Transporta- 
tion Department of the Chamber. 

Railroads traffic and operating 
departments, the Office of De- 
fense Transportation and the 
armed forces are cooperating in 
the effort to prevent serious ac- 
cumulation of freight cars during 
the holiday period which would 
greatly interfere with the ready 
flow of war materials. 



Local Firm Brochure Is 
Effective Also for S, F. 

Congratulations were extended re- 
cently to Herbert L. Sommer, presi- 
dent. Summers Kaufmann, on a sales 
brochure published by the firm en- 
titled "Fifty Years in San Francisco." 

• The brochure tells the story of 
its firm on a backdrop of the history 
and development of San Francisco. 

• In his letter of congratulations, 
Lundborg said, it "not only reflects 
great credit to your organization, but 
gives publicity of the highest order 
to this city. 

"ft is our hope that other local 
advertisers will tie in a commun- 
ity theme with their own message 
in so effective a manner." 



A Message From the Philippines 

Word has been received from Royal 
Arch Gunnison, Pacific correspondent 
and emissary of the San Francisco 
Chamber, reporting on conditions and 
prospects in the Philippines. 

As a Christmas greeting, Gun- 
nison wrote "Merry Christmas 
from the Liberated Philippines" 
on a piece of Japanese invasion 
currency. 

Gunnison and his wife were prison- 
ers of the Japanese lor 11 months 
alter the fall ol Manila, being repa- 
triated on the Gripsholm which ar- 
rived in New York, March. 1<M4. 



Appointment of Charles E. Gibbs, 
heretofore assistant to director. Cali- 
fornia Farm Production Council, as 
manager of the Agricultural Depart- 
ment of the San Francisco Chamber, 
has been announced by Louis R. 
Lundborg. general manager. 

• Until now, the Agricultural De- 
partment has been under the direction 
of C. P. Tanner, manager of the 
Chamber's Domestic Trade Depart- 
ment. 

"Gibbs has had experience in 
all phases of the agricultural in- 
dustry, and as manager of the 
department he will be in a posi- 
tion to exploit fully all oppor- 
tunities whereby San Francisco 
can assist this important Cali- 
fornia industry," Lundborg said, 
"and Tanner, by turning his 
agricultural activities over to 
Gibbs, will be able to devote full 
time to the Chamber's Domestic 
Trade Development program." 

• Gibbs was a farmer for eight 
years at Walnut Grove. His further 
experience included acting as buyer 
in various valley cities for San Fran- 
cisco wholesale and packing com- 
panies; public relations and securities 
work for Anglo-California Trust Com- 
pany and executive secretary of the 
Insurance Brokers Exchange. 



C of C Representatives Plan 
For Bay Area Promotion 

A special committee to consider 
possible need for a federation of Bay 
Area chambers of commerce or an 
area-wide advertising agency has been 
appointed by Adrien J. Falk, presi- 
dent, San Francisco Chamber of Com- 
merce, in accordance with authority 
given him at the last meeting of the 
Bay Area Industrial Development 
Conference. 

Following an organization 
meeting of the committee, T. E. 
Ward, manager, Pacific Gas & 
Electric Company, Richmond, 
was unanimously elected perma- 
nent chairman of the committee. 
• Sub-Committee — Ward was 
authorized to appoint a sub-commit- 
tee to develop a definite plan ol ac- 
tion, eithei for the setting up of a 
Ba\ Area promotion group, or for 
joint undertaking of certain specific 
projects on a pooled fund i 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Thursday, December 21, 1944 



FOREIGN TRADE TIPS 



The Chamber cannot guarantee any firm 
or individual mentioned in Trade Tips. It is 
suggested the usual investigation be made in 
each instance. For details call World Trade 
Department, EXbrook 4511 and refer to the 
Trade Tip's number. 

3686 TRADE WITH CUBA— Being interested in 
trade with San Fram i>co, i . Kwaldo Pereira C. engineer 

onomic Experimental Station. Santiago de 
La> Vegas, Cuba, wants to contact exporters and im- 
porters. 

3687 EXPORTATION— Braun & Vila, apartado 
2697, Buenos Aires, Argentina, desire to establish busi- 

ms with San Francisco manufacturers and 
exporters dealing with machinery, hardware, electrical 
articles, chemical products, etc. 

3688 BUSINESS WITH MEXICO— J. Inocencio 
Medina, Hidalgo 682. Tepic. Nayarit. Mexico, seeks 

ii manufacturers and exporters cf refrigera- 



3689 MEXICAN CURIOS— R. V. D. A. P.. S. de 

R. L.. apartado 10107, Mexico D. F.. Mexico, desires 

to appoint a representative in San Francisco to sell 

ioa made of gold, silver, leather and wool. 

3690 MEXICAN JADE— Talles Unidos de Jade 
Mexicano, apartado 2548, Mexico D. F-. Mexico, manu- 
factures articles of Jade and can supply any quantity 

bort time. A catalogue is on file at the World 
Trade Department. 

3691 LEATHER PRODUCTS— Overseas Trading 
Company. S. A„ apartado 226, engaged in the manu- 
facture and exportation of alligator leather goods 
would like to appoint an agent in San Francisco for 

i their products. 

3692 TRADE WITH FRANCE— Boyauderie Met- 
ropolitaine, 20 Rue Pontmartin, Avignon, France, is 
interested in the importation of hand-operated and 

i ■].,[ ma! household devices. Also wants to import 
animal bi-products. 

3693 ARGENTINE COMMODITIES— C.V. Braun 

25 de Mayo. 340. Buenos Aires. 
Argentina, are anxious to export textiles, food prod- 
in ts, leather articles, chemicals, etc. 

3694 PRODUCTS FROM ARGENTINA— La Ex- 

portadora del Plata, Independent: da 1816. Buenos Aires, 
Argentina, wants to contact importers of dairy products, 
eather, fruits, etc. 

31,95 LEATHER PRODUCTS— Lagomarsinoy Cia.. 
Junin 651. Buenos Aires. Argentina, manufacture all 
ather articles and want to appoint a repre- 
sentative in San Fr 



-- a OTHING TRADE— Pauleys*. Edment- 

Buildings, 66 Rundle Street. Adelaide, Australia, is 
interested in connections with firms engaged in various 

lini a of i lothing trade. 

3697 POSTWAR TRADE WITH AUSTRALIA— 
U H. Lobei & Co., Ltd. 80-92 McDhlone Street. 
Wootlooinoolon, Sydney Australia, manufacturers now 
engaged in war industry, seek connection with San 
manufacturers interested in post- 
war trade with Australia. Representative of Australian 
company now in San Francisco to make arrangements 
whereby Ins firm might manufacture in Australia cer- 
tain lines, particularly household labor-saving devices 
and building materials, now manufactured here. In- 
terested firms should contact Mr. S. J. Cornicle, Room 
.165. St. Francis Hotel, San Francisco, California. 



e to the United States markets, 
in a special bulletin supplied by Brazilian < i« 
Trade Bureau of New York. Copy of file with World 



Published weekly at 333 Pine St., San Fr 
Zone 4, County of San Francisco, California. Will 
Williams, Editor. Telephone EXbrook 4511. Sub- 
scription, Fifty Cents a Year (Included in Annual 
Dues). Entered as Second Class matter April 26, 
1944, at the Post Office at San Francisco, Cali- 
fornia, under the act of March 3, 1870. 



Farm Representatives 
In Nation's Capital 
on Labor Procurement 

Don W. McColly, deputy director, 
California Farm Production Council ; 
Irving Terrell, manager, Agricultural 
Bureau. San Joaquin Valley; and 
James Mills, Jr., representing the 
Growers Farm Labor Association, Sac- 
ramento Valley, have been in Wash- 
ington, D. C. presenting problems af- 
fecting agriculture in the State of 
California, according to Frank F. 
Marsh, manager, Washington Office, 
San Francisco Chamber. 

Through their efforts in con- 
nection with the provisions of the 
Farm Labor Act as it affects agri- 
culture in the State, Marsh said, 
they were able to provide suffi- 
cient information to the Appro- 
priations Committee of the Sen- 
ate that the committee has now 
approved an appropriation of 20 
million dollars allowing a carry 
over of $7,800,000 previously ap- 
propriated. 

• This bill authorizes the Director 
of the Extension Service of the De- 
partment of Agriculture to contract 
for the importation of Mexican Na- 
tionals to the extent of 10 million 
dollars and extends the provisions of 
the Farm Labor Act to December 
31, 1945. 

"The results of the efforts made 
in Washington are an indication 
of what coordination and coopera- 
tion among all interested groups 
will do," Marsh commented. 



Permanent Aviation Conterence 

Establishment of the California 
Aviation Conference on a permanent 
basis was approved at the recently 
held conference in Los Angeles on rec- 
ommendation by a three-man com- 
mittee composed of Kenneth R. 
MacDonald, manager. Aviation De- 
partment, San Francisco Chamber; 
Arthur Dudley, Sacramento Cham- 
ber; and Glen Eastburn, Los Angeles 
Chamber. 



DOMESTIC TRADE TIPS 



A digest of correspondence received from 
those desiring, or offering, lines of merchan- 
dise for representation. They are listed here 
as a service without necessarily bearing en- 
dorsement by the Chamber. For further de- 
tails, contact the Domestic Trade Depart- 
ment, EXbrook 4511, Ext. 56. 

D-6081 — E. J. GOETZE. EARL GOETZE COM- 
PAW. 2020 Walnut Street. Kansas City 8. Missouri, 
interested in acting as representative lor juvenile furni- 
ture, student desks, chairs, and unpainted furniture 
items in the Kansas Citv territory. 

D-608J— J. F, MURDOCH, 57; Granville St.. Van- 
couver. B. C. would like to a. t as representative for 
jewelry and gift ware lines in the lour western provinces 
of Canada. 



Survey of Alameda 
County Dwelling Units 
Shows Total of 187,203 

A total of 187.203 dwelling units in 
Alameda County was reported this 
week by the Oakland Chamber of 
Commerce. 

• This figure was reached in a re- 
port compiled by Robert S. ('.rant, 
division manager of the Alameda- 
Contra Costa Counties War Housing 
Centers, in cooperation with Myrtle 
Brown, manager of the Research and 
Statistical Department, Oakland 
Chamber of Commerce. 

The report, filed with Preston 
Wright, regional representative of 
National Housing Agency, and 
Harold D. Weber, general man- 
ager, Oakland Chamber of Com- 
merce, was based on the 1940 
census, existing dwelling units 
and new units constructed since 
the 1940 census. 

• Topping the dwelling list is ( t ak- 
land with 109,908 family units, rang- 
ing from temporary one-room apart- 
ments to spacious homes in the 
exclusive Piedmont residential dis- 
trict. 

Dwelling units in other commu- 
nities of the Metropolitan Oak- 
land Area are: Berkeley, 32,099; 
Albany, 3,774; Emeryville, 840; 
Piedmont, 2,815; Alameda, 12,865; 
San Leandro-Hayward district, 
1 1 ,392 ; and rural Alameda County, 
13,510. 




^u&we44~ 



PUBLISHED BY THE 

SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 



Volume 1 



Thursday, December 28, 1944 



Number 39 



WASHINGTON NOTES 



• Selective Service. — Col. Francis 
V. Keesling, Jr. of Selective Service 
told the Mead Investigating Com- 
mittee of the Senate on December 12 
that while the standards for occupa- 
tional deferment for men in the 26-29 
year group and the more liberal stand- 
ards for men in the 30-37 year group 
had not been changed by the action 
taken by Selective Service on Decem- 
ber 9, local boards would scrutinize 
cases more closely in order to produce 
more men. 

He stated, however, that any 
man in these age groups who has 
an occupational deferment must 
get approval from his Selective 
Service local board before leaving 
the job in which he received de- 
ferment or be subject to immedi- 
ate reclassification and delivery 
for induction. 



• Surplus Planes— YV. L. Clayton, 

Surplus War Property Administrator, 
has announced that 6,239 surplus 
planes have been sold and paid for 
as of December 1, 1944. and that a 
total of 23,391 planes had been de- 
clared surplus by the Army. Navy and 
other Government agencies. 



• FEA — The Foreign Economic Ad- 
ministration has notified exporters 
that a probable export allocation of 
approximately 20,000,000 linear yards 
of certain cotton textiles is anticipated 
for the first six months of 1945 for 
certain Middle East areas. 

Announcement of this probable 
allocation in Current Export Bul- 
letin No. 216, is made to assist 
exporters in soliciting orders in 
the Middle East area, but does 
not represent any commitment 
on the part of FEA, as the alloca- 
tion may be subject to change 
without notice, the agency said. 

From the Chamber's Washington Office. 



Chamber of Commerce Day at 
S. F. Ad Club to Honor Grady 



SPECIAL NOTICE 

A special discussion of 
The Brctton Woods Proposals 

will he held 

Monday, January 8, 1944 

at Red Room 

Fairmont Hotel 

MR. NORMAN T. NESS 

Assistant Director, Division of 

Monetary Research 

and 

Dr. RAYMOND F.MIKESELL 

Principal Economist 
Division of Monetary Research 

representatives of the 
United Stales Treasury Dept. 
will be the featured speakers. 
The meeting will be sponsored 
jointly by the San Francisco 
Chamber of Commerce and the 

Foreign Trade Association 

at a regular luncheon meeting 

of the Association. 



Rotary General Sec'y 
Will Speak In S. F. 

Philip Lovejoy, General Secretary, 
Rotary International, will address the 
San Francisco Rotary Club, on Jan- 
uary 2, in the Gold Ballroom of the 
Palace Hotel. 

Lovejoy, who has recently re- 
turned from a four-week plane 
trip to the British Isles, is in a 
position to inform Rotarians on 
conditions in Britain. 

As Assistant General Secretary to 
Rotary from 1930 to 1942, Lovejoy 
served in every division of its head- 
quarters in Chicago, Illinois, and was 
manager of 12 Rotary Assemblies 
held in Austria, Canada, Cuba, 
Mexico, Switzerland, and the United 
States. 



Chamber of Commerce Day .it the 
San Francisco Advertising Club will 
be held Wednesday, January 3, with 
a luncheon honoring Henry F. Grady, 
new president of the San Francisco 
Chamber of Commerce, who will be 
principal speaker. 

This will be Grady's first public 
appearance as Chamber President, 
and all members of the San Fran- 
cisco Chamber are invited by the 
Advertising Club to attend. The 
luncheon will be held in the Gold 
Ballroom, Palace Hotel, 12:15 p.m. 

• Grady will discussSan Francisco's 
future, the things which need to be 
done to assure the development of a 
"Greater San Francisco," and will 
outline his policy as 1945 Chamber 
president. 

Chamber members wishing to 
attend the luncheon may reserve 
tickets by calling the office of the 
Advertising Club, EXbrook 7337. 

• According to Grady, the cham- 
ber of commerce is a community in- 
stitution — "And by community," 
Grady explains, "I mean the whole 
area that San Francisco serves." 

• Community Unity — Grady cites 
community unity and improvement 
of the whole physical equipment of 
the community as among his primary- 
objectives. 

California Plant Receives 
WFA Award for Achievment 

Food processing plants in nine 
states recently shared honors in re- 
ceiving the War Food Administration 
Achievement "A" award for out- 
standing performance in processing 
of food. 

• In California, George V. Hos- 
kings, National City received the "A" 
award. 

Original idea for awarding of 
"A"s for high achievement in the 
food industry came from C. P. 
Tanner, manager, Domestic Trade 
Department, S. F. Chamber. 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Thursday, December 28, 1944 



Junior Chamber of Commerce 
Elects Officers for 1945 

Belford G. Brown, Assistant to the 
Controller of the San Francisco Bank, 
has been elected President of the 
Junior Chamber of Commerce to serve 
during 1945. 

Brown succeeds Elmer G. John- 
son, who recently was elected to 
the Board of Directors of the 
Chamber of Commerce. 
• Vice Presidents — The newly 
elected Executive Vice President of 
the organization is Volney E. Howard, 
Jr., Assistant Manager of Industrial 
Cnderwriters, Incorporated. 

William C. McCubbin, account- 
ant for the Wendling-Nathan Co., 
was elected Vice President and 
Treasurer, and Harry Goodfriend 
of the Anglo California National 
Bank was named Vice President. 

Newton C. "Bud" Cunningham has 
been re-elected secretary-manager. 

Although only 33, President-elect 
Brown has a long record of commu- 
nity service to his credit. During 1944 
he was a Director of the Junior 
Chamber, and General Chairman of 
the Annual Harbor Day Celebration. 
He has been with the San Francisco 
Bank for 12 years, and in addition to 
the Junior Chamber Presidency, he is 
a Vice President of the Golden Gate 
Conference of Bank Auditors and 
Comptrollers. 

S. F. Chamber Honors 
City Delegation to 
Legislature at Dinner 

In anticipation of the regular ses- 
sion of the State Legislature, which 
will convene January 8, 1945, the 
San Francisco delegation were guests 
at a dinner, Thursday, December 21, 
sponsored jointly by Adrien J. Falk, 
president, San Francisco Chamber of 
Commerce, and Henry F. Grady, 
president-elect, "to coordinate 
thoughts of those most interested in 
the future welfare of San Francisco 
prior to the 56th session." 

• The San Francisco Delegation 

is composed of the following: Hon. 
John F. Shelley; William Clifton 
Berry; Bernard R. Brady; George D. 
Collins, Jr. ; Edward M. Gaffney ; Ger- 
ald P. Haggertv; Thomas A. Malonev; 
Edward F. O'Day; Albert C. Wollen- 
berg. 

• Representing the Chamber 
along with Falk and Grady were 
Louis B. Lundborg, general manager, 
and Charles Gibbs, manager, Agri- 
cultural Department. 



Women's Work Pile 
In San Francisco 
Now Totals $842,728 

The Women's "Work Pile," con- 
ducted by the Women's Round Table 
in an effort to stimulate postwar think- 
ing and planning among the city's 
homemakers, has now reached a total 
of §842,728, with 1,049 questionnaires 
tabulated, according to the San Fran- 
cisco Chamber of Commerce. 

Detailed questionnaires circu- 
lated among housewives show that 
immediate home repair and re- 
modeling work will amount to 
approximately $206,498 and new 
additions or fixtures such as fur- 
naces, water heaters and lighting 
will cost about $25,980. 

• New household equipment in 
the form of electric appliances, labor- 
saving devices, rugs, draperies and 
other furnishings, will be purchased 
as soon as available at an estimated 
cost of S610.25O. 

• Additional questionnaires are 
being circulated through various 
women's groups and it is hoped that 
a fully representative cross-section of 
current thought on postwar plans for 
the home may be attained. 

Of the questionnaires tabu- 
lated 844 indicate that San Fran- 
cisco women will support San 
Francisco made clothing, hats and 
fabrics, and more than 85 per cent 
expect to remain in San Francisco. 

John Sowers to Oakland 
C of C World Trade Post 

John A. Sowers, former manager of 
the Oakland War Production Board 
Branch Office, has been named man- 
ager of the newly organized World 
Trade Department of the Oakland 
Chamber of Commerce. 

Sowers, director of the Oakland 
Foreign Trade and Harbor Club and a 
past president, assumes his new posi- 
tion on January 1, General Manager 
Harold D. Weber of the Oakland 
Chamber, said in announcing the ap- 
pointment. 

• Sowers' experience includes man- 
ufacturing and export selling. For 
eight years he was head of the Foreign 
Department at Armstrong College in 
Berkeley. 

During 1936, Sowers traveled 
through the Far East, visiting 
Japan, Korea, Manchuria, China 
and the Philippines. 

In 1937 he headed a group who 
visited South America covering the 
principal trade centers, representing 
the Oakland Chamber. 



S. F. Chamber 
Adds Market Analyst 
to Domestic Trade Staff 

To round out the activities and 
services rendered by the Domestic- 
Trade Department, Don Conway, 
market analyst, has been added to 
the San Francisco Chamber of Com- 
merce staff, it was announced today 
by Louis B. Lundborg, General Man- 
ager. 

"In preparing the Department's 
market studies, emphasis will be 
placed upon providing those in- 
terested in marketing with factual 
background information, both as 
an aid to postwar market evalua- 
tion and to exploit San Francisco 
as a market center," Lundborg 
said. 

• Market analyses—Working in 
conjunction with the Postwar Plan- 
ning Committee of the Domestic- 
Trade Committee, an extensive mar- 
ket analysis has been in process for 
several months. Various geographical 
divisions, such as San Francisco, the 
nine Bay Area counties, up to and in- 
cluding the eleven Western States, are 
being studied and compared to each 
other and the nation as a whole. 

Purpose of this study is to pro- 
vide figures indicating certain 
sales potentials of these divisions 
in "194x" that is, "the first year 
in which we again have relatively 
unrestricted production for a ci- 
vilian economy." 

• Available in 1945 —Due to the 
nature of the work and the printing 
time required, this material, devel- 
oped under the guidance of the 1944 
Postwar Planning Committee, will 
not be available to the public until 
early 1945. 

Conway was born in El ma, Wash- 
ington and obtained his higher edu- 
cation at Stanford. In 1<>42 he re- 
ceived his A.B. degree in Social Sci- 
ences and in 1944 his M.B.A. (Master 
of Business Administration) from the 
Stanford Graduate School of Business. 



New ODT Official 

Clifford K. Nickerson has been ap- 
pointed Assistant Regional Director, 
Property Operations, of the Office of 
Defense Transportation. 

He will be stationed in San 
Francisco and will supervise mo- 
tor transport operations of ODT's 
ten Highway Transport Depart- 
ment offices in California, Ore- 
gon, Nevada, Washington and 
Arizona. 



Thursday, December 28, 1944 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Pajaro Chamber Elects 
Officers; Colgrove 
Named 1945 President 

The Chamber of Commerce and 
Agriculture of the Pajaro Valley, fol- 
lowing annual election of officers, have 
named Don (). Colgrove, realtor, as 
president, and re-elected Franklin 
Lowney as manager for 1945. 

"Both Chamber officials have 
been closely identified with the 
nation-wide campaign which has 
resulted in Watsonville's becom- 
ing a fresh frozen food capital of 
the Pacific Coast," the Chamber 
announcement said. 



Richard Brigham's Service to 
C of C Commented on by Falk 



Peach Canners' Group 
Elects 1945 Officers 

Newly elected officers of the Cali- 
fornia Canning Peach Association 
were announced recently in the Asso- 
ciation Annual Report to members as 
follows : 

Donald C. Bull, president 
Logan H. Bowen. vice president 
A. E. Swanson, secretary 
John T. Halford, treasurer 
\Y. J. Edinger, manager 
E. E. Poston, assistant secretary 



Appreciation for a year's outstand- 
ing service to the San Francisco 
Chamber of Commerce in stimulating 
addition of new members and sub- 
stantial increases in financial support 
was today expressed to Richard D. 
Brigham, chairman, Membership Com- 
mittee, by President Adrien J. Falk. 

"Throughout the year, our 
Membership Committee, under 
Brigham's fine leadership, has 
worked enthusiastically and effec- 
tively to gain increased support 
for the Chamber's program and 
to make its membership more and 
more representative of all San 
Francisco business," Falk stated. 



BAY AREA RECONVERSIONS LIST 



Following is a compilation of spot authorized reconversions for civilian goods production in 
Northern California, a supplement to those listed in Bay Region Business, November 9, made 
available today by the Domestic Trade Department of the San Francisco Chamber of Commerce. 

In announcing lists of approved applications for civilian goods production, 
Henry S. Wright, Acting Regional Director, War Production Board, implied that the 
public should understand clearly that all cases are carefully screened so that per- 
mitted production will not interfere with the all-out war program. 



• San Francisco 

Steelform Contracting Co., 666 Harrison 

Street, steel forms for concrete construction 
Bankers Utilities Co., Inc., 268-lst Street, 

coin banks 
Chandelier Co.. 251 Post Street, portable 

lamps 
A. J. Ruhlman & Co., 3910 Geary Street, 

steel Venetian blinds 
Schor Mfg. Co., South San Francisco, butter 

cutting machines 
Herbst Brothers, 1525 Mission Street, gar- 
bage cans and fireplace accessories 
Dohrmann Hotel Supply Co., 972 Mission 

Street, aluminum commercial rooking uten- 
sils 
Shreve & Co., Post & Grant, silver-plated 

holloware 
Master Baker Oven Mfg. Co., 967 Howard 

Street, revolving tray ovens 
Duart Mfg. Co.. Ltd!, 984 Folsom Street, 

permanent wave machines 
States Batteries. Ltd. of No. California, 

1 Arkansas Street, replacement storage 

batteries 
Max Hoefner, 58-2nd Street, brass embossing 

dies 
American Binder Co., 440 San some Street, 

brass file fasteners 
San Francisco Ornamental Iron Works, 1144 

Howard Street, fireplace accessories 
Larkin Specialty Mfg. Co., 288- 1st Street, 

toilet tissue cabinet 
Lando Products Co., 780 Golden Gate, metal 

slats for Venetian blinds 
Peerless Electric Co., 955 Mission Street, hot 

plate disc stove 
Lamson Corporation, 611 Howard Street, 

pneumatic tube systems 
New Cutlery Co., San Francisco, cutlerv 



Northwestern Venetian Blind Supply Co., 
1216-24th Street, Venetian blind slats 



S. T. Johnson Company, 940 Arlington, do- 
mestic oil burners. 
Clare Goin & Helen Williams, 428 Howe 

Street, wire coat hangers 
Druge Bros. Mfg. Co., 888-92nd Ave., tire 

servicing equipment 
S. Loafea Mfg. Co., 5740 Elizabeth Street, 

fruit picking pails 
Malsbary Mfg. Co., 845-92nd Ave., steam 

vapor cleaners 
Hoyt Heater Co. of No. California, 926 High 

Street, gas fired storage water heaters. 
Empire Foundry' Co., Inc., 429-3rd Street, 

indoor fireplace equipment 
Joslin Mfg. Co., 2946 E. 14th Street, dual 

sleeping equipment 
Aluminum & Brass Casting Co. 1281-30th, 

aluminum frying pans 
Sunset Venetian Blind Co., 890-19th, steel 

Venetian blinds 
Auto-Lite Batten." Corp. of California, 98th 

Avenue & Sunnyside, storage batteries 
General Interiors, Consolidated, 1123-24th, 

steel Venetian blinds 
Glen B. Mohr, 774 High Street, doughnut 

fryers 

• Berkeley 

Ambassador Venetian Blind Co., 650 Ca- 
melia, steel slat Venetian blinds. 

Skewis Sound Systems, 3370 Adeline, electric 
heaters — portable 

Associated Industries, 1075-2nd, steel incin- 
erators 



• Miscellaneous Locations 

Kirbv's Muffler, East Monterey, exhaust 
muffler 

Sacramento Pump & Supply Hou*t\ No. 
Sacramento, irrigation equipment 

Cook Disc Co., Clovis. disc harrows 

Modesto Mattress Co., Modesto, inner- 
springs, mattresses 



Jud Whitehead Heater Co., 4111 Broadway, 
Emeryville, electric storage water heater 

Superior Mfg. Co., Belmont, fishing tackle 

Food Machinery- Corporation, San Jose, tur- 
bine pumps for farm use 

Albert V. Lindhome, Hercules, hunting knives 

Kavin Water Valve Co., Los Gatos, poultry- 
water float control 

American Steel Co., Visalia, water-well casing 

Laird Welding Works, Merced, hay loaders 

Hinshaw Mfg. Co., West Sacramento, coolers: 
reach-in refrigerated boxes 

American Tractor Equipment Co., 1401 Park 
Ave., Emeryville, land planes — -farm ma- 
chinery. 

Harris Mfg. Co.. Park & Wilson Way, Stock- 
ton, broadcast seeders 

L. H. Price Welding Co., Whites Bridge Road 
& Valentine, farm scrapers 

Werner's Mfg. Co., 215 S. Sacramento, safe 
deposit boxes, utility metal filing cabinets 

Moore Equipment Co., Wilson Way & Char- 
ter, Stockton, orchard ridgers & disc har- 

Frank J. Hudson, 702 Colorado, Modesto, 

water well casing 
Western Mfg. Co., 735 N. 13th, San Jose, 

hydraulic automobile lifts 
P. J. Freirmuth Co., 247 Main, Watsonville, 

water well casing 
Miller Mfg. Co., 1522-9th, Modesto, Miller 

feed mills 
H. C. Shaw Co., 46 N. California, Stockton, 

drawbars for wood bar harrow sections 
Western Pump Co., Ltd., 522 W. Santa Clara, 

San Jose, deep well turbine pumps 
Currie Mfg. Co., 2408 El Camino Real, Red- 
wood City, steel Venetian blinds 
Fiese & Firstenberger, E. Kern & Angus, 

Fresno, irrigation pumps 
Selma Trailer Mfg. Co., State Highway, 

Selma, vegetable & orchard wagons 
C. C. Bussey Well Pipe Works, Chestnut & 

Grant, Fresno, water well casing 
Yuba Tank & Steel Co., Ahem & Spear, 

Sacramento, tomato planters and potato 

diggers 
Ralph Edward Bergen, 549 27th, Richmond, 

"Pull" toys 
Valley Mattress Co., 416014th Ave., Sacra- 
mento, innerspring mattresses. 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



Thursday, December 28, 1944 



FOREIGN TRADE TIPS 



The Chamber cannot guarantee any firm 
or individual mentioned in Trade T js. It is 
suggested the usual investigation be made in 
each instance. For details call World Trade 
Department, EXbrooIc 451 1 and refer to the 
Trade Tip's number. 

3698 POST-WAR BUSINESS— H. V. Reich, apar- 
tado 1151. Buenos Aires, Argentina, is interested in 
representing manufacturers of nylon, glassware, alarm 
clocks, hardware, cards, etc., in the post-war period. 

3699 TEXTILES— Curt Israel. P.O. Box 1999. Tel- 
Aviv. Palestine, desires to represent manufacturers of 
textiles and various articles of clothing. 

3700 TRADE WITH EGYPT— A firm in Alex- 
andria, Egypt, wants to contact manufacturers of elec- 
trical appliances, toasters, office supplies, etc. For de- 
tails contact Pearl Assurance Company. 200 Bush 
Street. San Francisco. 

3701 ARGENTINE COMMODITIES— A. Colombo 

Leoni e hijo, San Lorenzo 1682, Rosario. Argentina. 
seek connections with importers in a position to buy 

animal products. 



3703 TRADE WITH PANAMA— Dario Anguizola. 
David. Republica de Panama, is anxious to represent 
manufacturers and exporters of various types of 
merchandise, 

3704 BUSINESS WITH PALESTINE— The Near 
East Clearing and General Trading Co., P.O. Box 988. 
Tel-Aviv, Palestine, wish connections with exporters ol 
steel, iron and building materials, offering them services 
as sales representatives on a commission basis. 



3705 EXPORTATION— G. A. Dickinson, 
olome Mitre 427. Buenos Aires. Argentina, des: 
inport various types of manufactured products 



K..i- 



Street, San Francisco, California, arc set-king additional 
lines of West Coast manufacturers for distribution in 
Latin America. For details contact L. M. Dii kson ol 
that company. 

3707 MEXICAN CURIOS— J. Gonzalez J., apartado 

5, TeocaJtiche. Jalisco. Mexico, seeks connr-. ■ti-.n- with 
firms interested in buying Mexican curios. 

3708 MACHINERY TO BRAZIL— J. Carlos dc 
Lima, P.O. Box 19. Joao Pessoa. Paraiba. Brazil, wants 
to represent manufacturers and exporters of welding 
machines, electric motors, electric engines, radios, 
typewriters, etc. 



representation in India. 

3710 REPRESENTATION — Departamento de 

Representaciones, apartado 809, Quito, Ecuador, has 
been organized recently and at the present time is in a 
position to represent manufacturers and exporters of 
textiles, machinery, pharmaceutical and chemical 
products, paper, leather articles, food products, etc. 

3711 COMMERCIAL INTEREXCHANGE — 

Limay. 842 Arroyo. Buenos Aires. Argentina, is anxious 
to export to the United States a great diversity of 

Argentine product - and import all kind- < ii l.iln ir- saving 
devices both for home and industrial purposes. 



Spring St.. Los Angeles, California, representing here 
Peruvian firm long time established in the lumber 
business, is interested in contacting local firms in order 
to place an initial order of 500.000 feet of Oregon Pine 
lumber for shipment during the first or second quarter 
of 1945. 

SPECIAL NOTICE— The Consul General of 
Ecuador has communicated to the Chamber that, in 
accordance with a legislative decree, a new stamp tax 
has been established on Consular Invoices covering 
shipments to Ecuador. This tax will be imposed in the 
following amounts: stamp of $0.25 when the Consular 



between $250 and $1000 There will be imposed ; 
additional stamp of $0-50 tor exch SIOOO or fraction 
. The stamp in reference will be affixed on t 



Federal Aid Road Act 
Amendment Passage 
Analyzed by Turkington 

Culminating efforts on the part of 
chambers of commerce and other local 
and national organizations in regard 
to the federal highway program, Presi- 
dent Roosevelt has signed the Fed- 
eral Aid Road Act Amendment allo- 
cating expenditures of SI, 500,000,000 
for a three year program, E. L. Turk- 
ington, chairman, Street and High- 
way Committee of the San Francisco 
Chamber announced today. 

According tc Charles H. Purcell, 
State director of public works, the 
bill provides around $22,000,000 
for California in federal funds, 
which require matching by the 
State of a 50-50 basis. 
• Following is an outline of authori- 
zations and segregations, as included 
in the Amendment : 



100.000,000 of the above sum authorized may be- 
come available immediately upon 
apportionment of the authorization 
for first fiscal year lor the making of 
surveys and plans and for construe- 

Except for the $100,000,000 above 
described, no part of the funds made 
available pursuant to this Act shall be 
used to pay costs incurred under any 
construction contract entered into by 
any State before the beginning of 
the "first postwar fiscal year." 
17,1,250.000 for parkways, forest and Indian res- 
ervation roads and trails is provided 
in addition to the $1,500,000,000 

• Segregations for each year during the three suc- 

lai $225,000,000 projects on regular Federal-aid High- 
way System 

Method of Apportionment — As pro- 
vided in Section 21 of the Federal 
Highways Act (H pop.; % area; % 
post road mileage) 

(b) 150.000.000 project on principal secondary and 



(c ) 125.000,000 project on highways in urban a 
Method of Apportionment— (R; 



DOMESTICTRADETIPS 



A digest of correspondence received from 
those desiring, or offering, lines of merchan- 
dise for representation. They are listed here 
as a service without necessarily bearing en- 
dorsement by the Chamber. For further de- 
tails, contact the Domestic Trade Depart- 
ment, EXbrooIc 4511, Ext. 56. 

D-6083 — NORTON' BELTING COMPANY. 
Wellesley Hills, Massachusetts, want salesmen for their 
products — belt dressing, disc adhesive, and spot re- 



builders hardware, and other specially tin 



Six New Directors 
Elected by Alameda 
Chamber; 12 Re-elected 

Announcement of six new directors 
of the Alameda Chamber of Com- 
merce was made last week. 

Each of the six will serve for 
three years. 

• New directors are :A1. P. Bareilles, 
William Chatham, Sumner M. Gra- 
ham, Gordon Hooper, John J. Mul- 
vany, and Stanley D. Whitney. 

• Other members of the Alameda 
Chamber's Board of Directors are: 
Jack P. McLaverty, Jr., K. I). Cad- 
sen, A. C Carrington, E. S. Agnew, 
S. Chesley Anderson, Leon Barker, 
Walter Flanigan, Earl D. Garber, 
Emil Kudrna, I. F. Kurtz, P. P. 
Mesquita, and Frank A. Runnels. 

Officers for 1945 will be elected 
at the next directors' meeting, ac- 
cording to John G. Rooks, secre- 
tary-manager. 



Published weekly at 333 Pine St.. San Francisco, 




Zone 4, County of San Francisco. California. Will 




Williams, Editor. Telephone EXbrook 4511. Sub- 




scription, Fifty Cents a Year (Included in Annual 




Dues). Entered as Second Class matter April 26. 




1944. at the Post Office at San Francisco. Cali- 




fornia, under the act of March 3, 1870.